Featured Pardee RAND Research

Pardee RAND students and faculty — and even some alumni — contribute to RAND research. This page features selected reports and projects to which the Pardee RAND community has contributed.

  • Repealing or Replacing ACA Would Result in More Uninsured Veterans and Stress on VA Health System

    Sep 14, 2017

    Recent congressional proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of uninsured nonelderly veterans and further increase demand for VA health care. The effects would vary across states, according to research by student Mimi Shen (cohort '16), but the largest impacts would be felt in states that expanded Medicaid.

  • Wearable Technologies for Law Enforcement

    Sep 8, 2017

    Wearable technologies that could help officers in the field, such as flexible batteries and wireless charging, are available today at reasonable costs. Law enforcement agencies should work with manufacturers to provide input on future wearables.

  • A Framework for Estimating The Benefits of Resilience Projects

    Aug 1, 2017

    Policymakers, program practitioners, and investors who want to achieve the greatest possible benefits from resilience projects lack effective tools to estimate the net benefits of those projects. Existing approaches often do not provide a sufficient framework for estimating the benefits that might accrue, especially if a shock or stress does not occur.

  • Lessons from Israel's Wars in Gaza

    Jul 26, 2017

    The Israel Defense Force had to evolve to meet an adaptive and determined hybrid adversary during its wars in Gaza. Student Elizabeth Bartels (cohort '15) and alum/prof Shira Efron (cohort '11) found that the U.S. Army and the joint force can learn from the IDF's challenge of balancing intense international legal public scrutiny and the hard operational realities of urban warfare.

  • Pittsburgh's Options to Address Lead in Its Water

    Jul 18, 2017

    Pittsburgh is struggling to improve its aging water system. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and alum/professor Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) review the history and recent developments related to the use of lead pipes and the policy options for lead remediation currently being weighed by local decisionmakers.

  • How to Bolster Recruitment of Women in the Military

    Jun 28, 2017

    As ground combat jobs are transitioning to include women, efforts to improve the recruitment process are expanding. Having more female recruiters would help, as would outreach materials that counter stereotypes and highlight the roles women fill in the military, according to research by student Christina Steiner (cohort '09) and professors Doug Yeung, Chaitra Hardison, and Lawrence Hanser.

  • The Effects of Travel and Tourism on California's Economy

    Jun 27, 2017

    California's travel and tourism industry employs a diverse workforce that makes a meaningful contribution to the state's economy. Student Olena Bogdan (cohort '12) and professor Ed Keating find that, for some, the industry offers a stable career path with good wages and wage growth. For others, it's a launching point into other industries.

  • Provider Fraud in California Workers' Compensation

    Jun 26, 2017

    Workers' compensation fraud is thought to be one of the fastest growing forms of insurance fraud. One particular form of fraud involves the manipulation of rules and procedures by providers, particularly those delivering health care services and supplies.

  • 'Principal Pipelines' Can Be an Affordable Way to Improve Schools

    Jun 20, 2017

    Improving school leadership by better selecting, training, and evaluating principals can be an affordable way to reduce turnover and improve schools, according to research by Melody Harvey (cohort '12) and professor Susan Gates.

  • Reforms to the U.S. Child Welfare System Could Save $12 Billion and Improve Outcomes

    May 23, 2017

    The United States could improve long-term outcomes and reduce child welfare system costs by $12.3 billion by striking a better balance between programs to prevent child maltreatment and those that offer services for kids who have already suffered from abuse, according to research by students Ifeanyi Edochie and Lauren Davis (both cohort '15) and professor Jeanne Ringel.

  • Inching Toward Reform: Trump's Deregulation and Its Implementation

    May 19, 2017

    How well does President Donald Trump's plans for a regulation roll-back address the concerns of those who have long supported regulatory reform, and how can agencies best tackle the challenges and opportunities of implementation?

  • Strategic Planning Tools for the Army Senior ROTC Program

    May 5, 2017

    Researchers created a program evaluation tool and a selection evaluation tool to help the Army evaluate existing ROTC programs and explore new market opportunities, keep up with changes in the college student population, and meet both near-term officer production goals as well as longer-term strategic objectives.

  • Prototype Tool Designed to Help Law Enforcement Use Data from Mobile Applications

    May 1, 2017

    Student Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) worked with alumni Anne Boustead ('11) and Steven Isley ('10) and professor Ed Balkovich to document a prototype tool called MIKE (the Mobile Information and Knowledge Ecosystem) that can help interested stakeholders — law enforcement, commercial enterprises, regulators, legislators, and the public (including advocacy groups) — better understand the mobile app ecosystem and the relationships among the data, its sources, and applicable legal constraints.

  • Just Right: Combatting Childhood Obesity Through Portion Size

    Mar 27, 2017

    Single-serving guidelines can help kids avoid eating too much when eating out. Student Cameron Wright (cohort '12) and professor Deborah Cohen created this infographic summarizing right-sized portions for kids.

  • Wages, Employment, and STEM Education in Appalachia

    Mar 22, 2017

    Student Nicholas Broten (cohort '15) coauthored an ongoing assessment of employment and wages in energy and advanced manufacturing industries in the Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia region. The report captures trends about which counties might have greater demand for educating or employing local talent in STEM careers.

  • Testing the Scenario Hypothesis via an Experimental Comparison

    Mar 16, 2017

    Alumni Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) and Zhimin Mao (cohort '11), along with professor Robert Lempert and other RAND researchers, undertook an experimental comparison of scenarios and forecasts to see which was most useful in a complex decision environment. The results offer lessons for designing decision support tools.

  • RAND Releases Evaluation of the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan

    Mar 9, 2017

    The Jinan Municipal Water Resources Bureau, with support from the Shandong Provincial Department of Water Resources, asked RAND to evaluate potential effects of demand and climate uncertainties on investments recently undertaken according to the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan. The RAND research team, led by David Groves and Debra Knopman, also assessed the potential of new investments and management strategies to help Jinan meet its long-term water resources goals.

  • Assessing the Needs of Massachusetts' Veterans

    Mar 7, 2017

    As part of the overarching Massachusetts Veterans project, student Erin Duffy (cohort '15) worked with professor Terri Tanielian and other researchers to assess the needs of the state's veterans to help inform investments in services and guide efforts to remedy barriers to access.

  • Supporting Massachusetts' Veterans: A Needs Assessment

    Mar 7, 2017

    There are still pockets of unmet need for Massachusetts veterans. Better understanding these needs will help the state target investments and guide efforts to remedy barriers to access.

  • Does Texas Need to Expand its Graduate Degree Production?

    Mar 3, 2017

    In an assessment of the Lone Star State's higher education system, RAND experts found opportunities to increase competitiveness through continued research, increased funding, a greater emphasis on institutional support, program accreditation, and more.

  • What It Takes to Deter Russian Aggression in the Baltics

    Mar 1, 2017

    The United States and NATO face several challenges in deterring Russia in the Baltics. Solving these is vital to achieving core U.S. objectives in Europe. The first step, says professor David Shlapak, is to ensure that NATO can stay in the game and deny Moscow an easy strategic victory.

  • Assessment of the Civilian Acquisition Workforce Personnel Demonstration Project

    Feb 15, 2017

    Student Cameron Wright (cohort '12), alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), and professor Laura Werber joined forces with RAND colleagues to assess DoD's AcqDemo, finding several aspects of the program that are performing well but also areas that could be improved.

  • Realizing Autonomous Vehicle Safety

    Feb 14, 2017

    Autonomous vehicles hold enormous promise for transportation safety, said professor Nidhi Kalra in her testimony to Congress. But feasible, sound methods of testing need to be developed. In the meantime, policymakers should work to foster the development of self-driving vehicles while lowering their risks.

  • How to Counter Transnational Criminal Networks

    Jan 27, 2017

    Transnational criminal networks have expanded their global reach. In some cases, they have even converged with terrorist groups. Research by alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) and RAND colleagues examines how these networks threaten U.S. interests and what can be done to combat them.

  • Helping Soldiers Use Army Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities in Civilian Jobs

    Jan 24, 2017

    Some veterans struggle to find jobs after they leave the Army. Alum Michael Shanley (cohort '79) helped to identify a broad range of high-quality civilian jobs that match Army KSAs.