Featured Pardee RAND Research

Pardee RAND students and faculty — and even some alumni — contribute to RAND research. This page features selected reports and projects to which the Pardee RAND community has contributed.

  • World map in red pixels on a dark background, photo by Lidiia Moor/Getty Images

    Are States Using Cyber Operations to Coerce Others?

    Sep 17, 2019

    Cyber operations have become another tool of statecraft. Have any cyber operations sponsored by Russia, China, Iran, or North Korea met the definition of cyber coercion? Krystyna Marcinek (cohort '17) and colleagues explore this question and consider what the United States should do to respond.

  • Cocaine, cannabis leaf, and syringe, photos by Bits and Splits, underworld, and Leonid/Adobe Stock

    How Big Is the U.S. Market for Cannabis, Cocaine, Heroin, and Meth?

    Aug 20, 2019

    Americans spent about $150 billion on cannabis, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine in 2016, according to research by alum Greg Midgette (cohort '09), student Steve Davenport ('15), and professor Beau Kilmer. The cannabis market was roughly the size of the cocaine and meth markets combined.

  • Hand writing on a document, photo by PeopleImages/Getty Images

    Assessing IRB Perspectives Before Implementation of the Revised Common Rule

    Jul 26, 2019

    Student Alexandra Mendoza-Graf (cohort '16) and colleagues surveyed institutional research board (IRB) chairs, administrators, and members, as well as principal investigators, to obtain baseline information on their demographics and attitudes about their IRB's efficacy and efficiency and the likely effects of proposed changes to the Revised Common Rule.

  • Group of medical practitioners in a circle, talking, seen from above, photo by Cecilie_Arcurs/Getty Images

    Identifying High-Performing Health Systems

    Jul 24, 2019

    When it comes to identifying high-performing health systems, alum Cheryl Damberg (cohort '89) finds, what you measure and how you measure it matters.

  • Men listening in a support group, photo by SolStock/Getty Images

    Evaluation Shows Pilot Study Helped Identify Needs and Recommendations to Improve Health and Reentry Services

    Jul 24, 2019

    Individuals returning to the community from jail often face difficulties accessing services that improve reentry and reduce recidivism. Gabriela Armenta (cohort '15) and RAND colleagues reviewed a pilot study in Los Angeles County, the Co-Design of Services for Health and Reentry (CO-SHARE), that encouraged returning individuals and service providers to collaborate on improving health and reentry services.

  • Elderly couple looking at sticky notes on a wall, photo by MonicaNinker/Getty Images

    Is Canada Prepared to Meet Demand for Alzheimer's Treatment?

    Jul 18, 2019

    If a treatment to slow the progression of Alzheimer's became available in 2021, hundreds of thousands of patients in Canada could progress to Alzheimer's dementia while on wait lists unless health care capacity is increased. Student Sangita Baxi (cohort '17) and alumni Jodi Liu ('12) and Jakub Hlavka ('14) explore challenges and suggest potential solutions.

  • Newborn hand holding the finger of an adult hand, photo by deng qiufeng/Getty Images

    Improving the Child Welfare System to Respond to the Needs of Substance-Exposed Infants

    Jul 17, 2019

    To realize the gains envisioned by recent legislation, alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) says the Administration and Congress should prioritize additional funding to modernize our child welfare system to meet the unique needs of families affected by substance misuse.

  • Smart car 3D rendering, photo by Production Perig/Adobe Stock

    When an Autonomous Vehicle Is Hacked, Who Is Liable?

    Jul 12, 2019

    Hacks on autonomous vehicles could lead to deaths, property destruction, ransomware attacks, or data theft. Maya Buenaventura and Pavan Katkar (both cohort '14) worked with RAND colleagues to explore several scenarios that illustrate the policy challenges facing the civil legal system, insurers, and others.

  • Equations and formulas behind scales of justice, images by monsitj and DNY59/Getty Images

    Addressing the Challenges of Algorithmic Equity

    Jul 11, 2019

    Social institutions increasingly use algorithms for decisionmaking purposes. Luke Irwin (cohort 16) and colleagues explored how different perspectives on equity or fairness inform the use of algorithms in the context of auto insurance pricing, job recruitment, and criminal justice.

  • A teacher helping students draw with colored pencils, photo by Jack F/Adobe Stock

    Do Educators Have What They Need to Teach Students with Disabilities?

    Jun 27, 2019

    To serve students with high-incidence disabilities, teachers need a supportive school culture, collaboration and planning time, resources and training, access to data, and tools for using data. Rachel Perera (cohort '16) and colleagues analyzed survey data that sheds light on the extent to which these supports are available to general and special educators in U.S. schools.

  • Australia technology of internet of things IOT big data cloud computing, conceptual 3D render by immimagery/AdobeStock

    Designing a Capability Development Framework for Australian Home Affairs

    Jun 24, 2019

    Australia's Department of Home Affairs is responsible for domestic security, law enforcement, migration, and the movement of goods across Australia’s borders. Alum Jon Wong (cohort '12) and colleagues analyzed which capability development lifecycle management framework best suits the department's needs for an enterprise-level approach to investment decisions.

  • NATO flag against a background of binary numbers, photo by robsonphoto/Adobe Stock

    Cyberspace as a Military Domain: Lessons for NATO

    Jun 20, 2019

    In 2016, NATO identified cyberspace as a new operational domain. Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) and RAND colleagues asked what steps the alliance has taken since then to bolster its cyber capabilities and what are the greatest challenges that still lie ahead.

  • Magnifying glass and pen atop pages of graphs

    Reviewing Funding Formulas for State Grants

    Jun 19, 2019

    Students Meg Chamberlin (cohort '14) and Nima Shahidinia ('16) worked with RAND researchers to analyze the formulas for distributing funds to states under three block grants for services related to mental health, substance abuse, and homelessness (unchanged since 1992), to determine whether they should be modified.

  • A row of lockers in a high school, photo by Monkey Business Images/Getty Images

    Secondary Educators Consider Discipline Reform a Priority

    Jun 13, 2019

    One quarter of principals and 31 percent of teachers surveyed identified discipline reform as one of the top three most important interventions needed in their secondary schools, according to research by Rachel Perera (cohort '16). Principals and teachers in high-poverty schools were more likely than those in low-poverty schools to do so.

  • Picture of a crowd of people holding and raising rainbow flags during an LGBT parade, photo by BalkansCat.

    Sexual Minority Disparities in Opioid Misuse

    Jun 12, 2019

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults, particularly bisexual women, are at significantly higher risk than heterosexuals for prescription opioid misuse and heroin use, according to research by alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). Disparities in rates of opioid misuse among LGB adults are concerning given elevated risks of overdose.

  • A homeless man in southern California, photo by ArtyAlison/Getty Images

    Local Effort Reduces Homelessness and Use of City Services

    Jun 5, 2019

    A program that provided people experiencing chronic homelessness with housing, health care, and other services helped them get off the streets and reduced spending on public services, such as emergency medical care. Student Karishma Patel (cohort '17) helped to evaluate the program.

  • An illustration of a human's moral compass, image by Trifonov_Evgeniy/Getty Images

    Ethics in Scientific Research

    Jun 5, 2019

    An analysis by student Carlos Ignacio Gutierrez (cohort '13), Prof. Tepring Piquado, and several RAND colleagues examines how ethics are created, monitored, and enforced, finds which ethical principles are common across scientific disciplines, explores how these ethics might vary geographically, and discusses how emerging topics are shaping future ethics.

  • Newspapers and social media terms in LED display, photos by artisteer/Getty Images and phive2015/Adobe Stock

    Facts vs. Opinions: How the News Is Changing in the Digital Age

    May 14, 2019

    Technology has transformed how people get information. But it has also affected the way that information is produced, shared, and disseminated. Students Steven Davenport (cohort '15), Shawn Smith ('17), and Mahlet Tebeka ('17) worked with professors Jennifer Kavanagh and William Marcellino to investigate how much the presentation of news has actually changed over the last three decades.

  • Supporters of a "Medicare for All" plan gather on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., September 13, 2017, photo by Yuri Gripas/Reuters

    Spending Estimates Under Medicare for All

    Apr 10, 2019

    Under a Medicare for All plan similar to some proposals being discussed in Congress, alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner calculate that total health expenditures would be an estimated 1.8 percent higher in 2019, relative to the status quo. While this is a small change in national spending, the federal government's health spending would increase substantially, rising by an estimated 221 percent.

  • A principal meeting with teachers, photo by Claire Holt/The Wallace Foundation

    Principal Pipelines Benefit Students and Reduce Principal Turnover

    Apr 8, 2019

    Six urban districts implemented principal pipelines, a strategic approach to the hiring, preparation, evaluation, and support of school leaders. Student Emilio R. Chavez-Herrerias (cohort '14) found that the efforts were feasible, affordable, and effective. The schools not only outperformed comparison schools in both math and reading, but they also improved principal retention.

  • Petty Officer 1st Class Krystyna Duffy, a boatswain's mate assigned to Coast Guard Station Golden Gate in San Francisco, drives a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat near the Golden Gate Bridge, February 8, 2018, photo by PO3 Sarah Wi/U.S. Coast Guard

    Alum Examines Why Women Leave the Coast Guard, and What Could Encourage Them to Stay

    Mar 29, 2019

    Women leave the Coast Guard at higher rates than men. Through focus groups, alum David Schulker (cohort '07) uncovered concerns about work environment, career issues, and personal life matters. More inclusive personnel policies could help the Coast Guard address these concerns and retain more women.

  • Engineers are using this specially constructed five-story building to study how high-value buildings, such as hospitals and data centers, can remain operational after an earthquake, in San Diego, California, April 17, 2012, photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

    Seismic Safety Upgrades May Cost California Hospitals Billions

    Mar 28, 2019

    David Catt (cohort '16) worked with alum Daniel Waxman ('10) and several professors to estimate the cost to California hospitals of seismic retrofitting. The upgrades could cost between $34 billion and $143 billion statewide, but one-third of hospitals are already in some form of financial distress.

  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands ahead of their talks at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China, March 21, 2017, photo by Etienne Oliveau/Reuters/Pool

    How Has the Israel-China Relationship Evolved?

    Mar 21, 2019

    Since the early 2000s, relations between China and Israel have expanded in areas like diplomacy, trade, investment, construction, educational partnerships, scientific cooperation, and tourism. Alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) and student Emily Haskel ('16) examine what challenges the relationship poses for Israel and the United States.

  • Patient consulting with his doctor via videochat over his laptop, photo by Henfaes/Getty Images

    Experiences of Medicaid Programs and Health Centers in Implementing Telehealth

    Mar 8, 2019

    Safety-net providers underuse telehealth due to a range of policy, organizational, and logistical barriers. Examining the use of telehealth by federal programs in seven states, researchers identified common themes and considerations for policymakers.

  • An aerial view of the San Francisco Bay delta, photo by Andrei / Adobe Stock

    Decision Support Tool for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Levees Investment Strategy

    Mar 7, 2019

    The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta faces complex and varied flood risks. Possible investments to mitigate these risks are numerous, and they will affect Delta risks differently. A decision support tool developed by alum David Groves (cohort '01) and student James Syme ('18) aided the Delta Stewardship Council in developing a Delta Levees Investment Strategy.