Featured Pardee RAND Research

Pardee RAND students and faculty — and even some alumni — contribute to RAND research. This page features selected reports and projects to which the Pardee RAND community has contributed.

  • South Korean soldiers conduct a pass in review during a military parade to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the South Korean-U.S. alliance in Seoul, South Korea, October 1, 2013

    North Korea's Expanding Nuclear Program Drives a Complex Set of Problems

    Jan 11, 2019

    North Korean provocations and threats have created an unstable environment on the Korean Peninsula. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) and colleagues say the U.S. and its allies must attend to four interconnected problems. Failure to prepare will increase the chance of miscalculation and constrain options to reduce the likelihood or gravity of future conflicts.

  • A judge holding a gavel in a courtroom

    Holistic Representation Can Reduce Incarceration and Save Taxpayer Dollars

    Jan 11, 2019

    A public defense model that seeks to address the underlying challenges and needs of poor offenders prevented more than 1 million days of incarceration over 10 years, without reducing public safety.

  • Nurse helping mother patient fill out paperwork in clinic waiting room

    Expanding Enrollment Without the Individual Mandate

    Dec 27, 2018

    Recent changes to the Affordable Care Act, including the elimination of the individual mandate penalty, may reduce enrollment in the individual market. But research by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner finds that, even with these changes, options exist for increasing health coverage.

  • Construction worker helping an injured worker walk

    Monitoring Wage Loss for Injured Workers in California

    Dec 27, 2018

    Nicholas Broten (cohort '15) and RAND colleagues compared earnings losses for California workers who suffered a workplace injury or illness in 2014-15 against previous trends. They found that earnings have increased slightly but remain lower than the pre-recession average.

  • Italian MP Marietta Tidei talks with students at a school for vulnerable Syrian refugees in Gaziantep, Turkey

    Challenges to the Integration of Syrian Refugees

    Dec 18, 2018

    The successful resettlement of Syrian refugees is dependent on political commitment coupled with public support and community engagement, according to research by student Gabriela Armenta (cohort '15) and alum Mahal Woldetsadik ('13). Social and economic policies to address the crisis require a combined effort in planning, implementing, monitoring, and assessing initiatives, and sharing data with stakeholders.

  • A 3D rendering of a chess board on a globe

    What Does the Emerging Era of International Competition Look Like?

    Dec 17, 2018

    There is a general expectation of a new era of strategic competition, characterized by growing rivalry in the political, economic, and military spheres. But Tim McDonald (cohort '16), Prof. Michael Mazarr, and RAND colleagues found there is no consensus on what that means or what forms it could take. Theory and history can shed light on the coming era.

  • Workers in a textile factory in Igdir, Turkey, May 20, 2017

    Win-Win Solutions for Syrian Refugees—and Their Hosts

    Dec 13, 2018

    Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan have generously received the majority of Syrian refugees. Many are working, but their sheer numbers have strained local labor markets, public services, and social harmony. Gursel Aliyev (cohort '13) worked with professors Krishna Kumar and Kathryn Bouskill to explore which policies might help create new economic opportunities for both the refugees and host-nation workers.

  • Photo of the WeRise event

    Evaluation of Los Angeles County's Mental Health Community Engagement Campaign

    Nov 14, 2018

    A community engagement campaign sought to increase awareness of mental health access as a civil rights issue and to increase civic engagement. Student Lauren Davis (cohort '15) and colleagues found that youth who took part showed increased supportive and understanding attitudes toward mental illness, and empowerment and mobilization toward activism around mental health issues.

  • Group of people standing and holding hands

    Evaluating Savings Associated with LA County's Mental Health Programs

    Oct 30, 2018

    Los Angeles used its Mental Health Services Act funds to expand access to Full Service Partnership programs. Student Gulrez Azhar (cohort '14) and colleagues estimated that, over a five-year period, program outcomes were associated with $82.9 million cost savings, a 24 percent reduction in government spending.

  • A principal and teacher walking in a school corridor

    Universities Are Improving Training of Future School Principals

    Oct 30, 2018

    Student Rachel Perera worked with Prof. Susan Gates and RAND colleagues to evaluate the University Principal Preparation Initiative, in which seven universities are beginning to change their principal preparation programs to better reflect the real-world demands of the job.

  • A Palestinian woman drags a cart loaded with water containers after filling them from a public tap in the city of Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip, February 28, 2017

    How to Solve the Water Crisis in Gaza

    Sep 26, 2018

    Gaza has long had water and sanitation challenges, but today it's in a state of emergency. Research by alumni Shira Efron (cohort '11) and Jordan Fischbach ('04), student Rouslan Karimov ('15), and Prof. Melinda Moore finds that the crisis could be resolved through infrastructure investment, but political complications and other barriers remain.

  • View from above of a male patient talking to a receptionist in a doctor's office

    Alumni Evaluate Health Care Payment Reform Pilot

    Aug 31, 2018

    California's Global Payment Program seeks to improve health care for the state's uninsured by providing funds for both traditional and non-traditional services, settings, and providers. Alumni Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Denise Quigley ('91) conducted a mid-point evaluation that found broad improvement.

  • Three male workers wearing personal safety equipment in a factory

    How Can Workers' Compensation Systems Promote Occupational Safety and Health?

    Aug 31, 2018

    Student Nicolas Broten (cohort '15) helped assess the challenges that workers' compensation stakeholder groups have identified, as well as which policy options and research efforts are most important for reforming workers' compensation policy to promote the well-being of workers.

  • Refueling operations in a KC-135 Stratotanker

    Is the USAF Flying Force Large Enough?

    Aug 28, 2018

    The U.S. military has mostly operated at a high operational tempo since the end of the Cold War, and there appears to be no significant reduction in demand on the horizon. This report draws on historical data to quantify gaps in the U.S. Air Force's capacity to meet potential future demands.

  • Patients in a busy waiting room

    New York's Proposed Single-Payer Plan Could Expand Coverage Without More Spending

    Aug 1, 2018

    The New York Health Act could provide insurance to all New York State residents without increasing overall spending if administrative costs are reduced and growth in provider payment rates is restrained, according to research by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), student Jamie Ryan ('17), and professors Christine Eibner, Sarah Nowak, and Chapin White. New taxes, instead of premiums and out-of-pocket payments, would finance the program.

  • Ducklings and a swan gather on a sandbank in the Jamaica Bay neighborhood of New York City

    Building Resilience in an Urban Coastal Environment

    Jul 31, 2018

    Research by alum Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) examines the potential effects of climate change and sea level rise on flood risk, ecosystems, and water quality in New York City's Jamaica Bay, and how flood risk can be reduced while also improving water quality, restoring habitat, and improving resilience to extreme weather events.

  • wifi

    Developing a Manual for Cultural Analysis

    Jul 9, 2018

    Drawing from cognitive and evolutionary anthropology traditions, the authors describe a set of tools capable of dealing with cultural data at various emergent levels. Many techniques are known in the published literature, but this is the first time they have been organized into a single manual structured around a formally theorized notion of culture.

  • Aerial view of Miami, Florida

    Adapting to a Changing Climate in Southeast Florida

    Jun 6, 2018

    Florida's Miami-Dade and Broward counties are vulnerable to flooding and intrusion of saltwater into drinking water. These risks are driven by sea level rise, changes in precipitation, and urban development. Alum David Groves (cohort '01) and colleagues ask, how can the region adapt?

  • A woman and two men in hard hats on a construction site

    Bridge to Opportunities: Connecting Probationers to High-Wage Jobs

    May 25, 2018

    Probation agencies face significant challenges to helping their clients find jobs, and earn living wages. Student Lisa Jonsson (cohort '14) and colleagues highlight one program in the construction industry that aimed to improve the earning potential of individuals on probation in Sacramento County, California.

  • 3d printing in progress

    Additive Manufacturing in 2040: Powerful Enabler, Disruptive Threat

    May 8, 2018

    Student Luke Irwin (cohort '16) and professors Troy Smith and Trevor Johnston examined the future of additive manufacturing, or 3D printing. If it continues to develop along its current trends, they write, it could profoundly alter the global economy, international security, and the organization of society.

  • Dad works from home, holding baby on his lap

    Understanding Government Telework

    Apr 23, 2018

    Alum Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) contributed to a report examining U.S. government practices regarding working from home, the benefits of these policies, and their possible challenges—especially for employees in the national security sector.

  • A 74th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot in her aircraft during the squadron's deployment in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve at Graf Ignatievo, Bulgaria, March 18, 2016

    How the U.S. Air Force Could Retain More Female Officers

    Apr 10, 2018

    Women are underrepresented among the Air Force's senior leadership compared with their representation among the lower ranks. Alum Stefan Zavislan (cohort '14) helped conduct focus groups with female officers, which identified key retention factors and potential ways to improve Air Force policies and programs to address female officer retention.

  • A view of Earth from outer space

    Is Climate Restoration an Appropriate Policy Goal?

    Apr 6, 2018

    Climate restoration seeks to return atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases to preindustrial levels within one to two generations. Prof. Robert Lempert explores whether this is a suitable goal for humanity's response to climate change.

  • Closeup of a woman's hands holding a menu

    How Do Calorie Labels Affect Consumers?

    Mar 28, 2018

    In standard restaurant settings, displaying the calorie content on restaurant menus slightly reduced the amount ordered without affecting consumer satisfaction, according to research by alum Helen Wu (cohort '07), students Crystal Huang ('13) and Cameron Wright ('12), and Prof. Roland Sturm.

  • Contrast different bright human watercolor

    Evaluation of Mental Health Service Act in L.A. County Shows Services Reaching Those in Need

    Mar 13, 2018

    Los Angeles County uses Mental Health Services Act funds programs to reach at-risk populations. Students Gulrez Shah Azhar and Margaret Chamberlin found that the county was able to offer services and prevention efforts that lowered both homelessness and the need for psychiatric hospitalizations, while improving employment and wellbeing.