Featured Pardee RAND Research

Pardee RAND students and faculty — and even some alumni — contribute to RAND research. This page features selected reports and projects to which the Pardee RAND community has contributed.

  • Improving Children's Lives: Balancing Investments in Prevention and Treatment in the Child Welfare System

    Dec 11, 2017

    Increasing prevention and treatment improves children's experience and long-term outcomes while paying for itself by reducing lifetime child welfare system costs.

  • Improving Child Welfare Outcomes

    Dec 11, 2017

    Policies aimed at increasing prevention and kinship care in the child welfare system improve children's experience and long-term outcomes. This approach is also cost effective, reducing total spending by 3 to 7 percent.

  • International Commercial Drone Regulation and Drone Delivery Services

    Dec 5, 2017

    As unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) rapidly evolve, regulators are scrambling to keep up with new uses, capabilities, and technology. Understanding international drone legislation is critical to determine which countries will be the most open to the use of delivery drones and what precedent is set for late-acting countries.

  • Promising Approaches to Army Institutional Change

    Dec 5, 2017

    The U.S. Army faces challenges including behavioral health issues, misconduct, and adjustment to changing demographics. Student Adeyemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) and alum Ben Batorsky (cohort' 12) found that long-term solutions will require changes in Army culture and climate. Such changes are difficult, but promising strategies do exist.

  • Housing People Experiencing Homelessness May Save Money

    Dec 5, 2017

    Housing for Health provides permanent supportive housing to people in Los Angeles County with complex medical and behavioral health issues. Student Melody Harvey (cohort '12) found that, after one year, participants reported dramatic reductions in use of public services, such as emergency medical care, resulting in a net cost savings of 20 percent.

  • Early Childhood Programs Can Improve Outcomes and Outweigh Costs

    Nov 16, 2017

    Students Ashley Muchow (cohort '13) and Maya Buenaventura (cohort '14) worked with professors Jill Cannon, Lynne Karoly, and Rebecca Kilburn to review 115 early childhood interventions — including preschool, home visiting, parent education, and other approaches. They found that most programs have favorable effects on at least one child outcome, and most of the programs with benefit–cost analyses show positive returns.

  • U.S. Health System Should Prepare for Future Alzheimer's Treatments

    Nov 15, 2017

    Advanced clinical trials are underway for at least 10 promising therapies for Alzheimer's disease. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) found that the U.S. health care system lacks the capacity to rapidly move a treatment from approval into wide clinical use. Millions of people could miss out on transformative care if such a breakthrough occurs.

  • Employers and Colleges Could Plan Better for Future Oil and Natural Gas Workforce

    Oct 17, 2017

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to tap natural gas should bring long-term economic benefits to Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15) helped survey employers and educators to inform policy decisions on how best to expand and sustain the pool of workers with the needed knowledge and skills.

  • Evaluating Iowa's Proposed Stopgap Measure

    Oct 16, 2017

    To stabilize the state's individual health insurance market, Iowa proposed the Iowa Stopgap Measure (ISM). Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and colleagues say ISM modifications would increase the federal deficit, but decrease federal spending per enrollee.

  • Public Cord Blood Banks Provide Benefits Despite Drop in Use

    Sep 29, 2017

    U.S. umbilical cord blood banks are a valuable resource for patients and the research community. Research by student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) indicates their benefits far outweigh their costs and they should continue to receive federal support. Stakeholders could work together to strengthen the industry and improve the genetic diversity and quality of the national inventory.

  • Community Citizen Science Could Transform Science and Society

    Sep 27, 2017

    Community citizen science involves public participation in research to support interventional activities or policy change. Students Amanda F. Edelman and Therese Jones (both cohort '13) find that there is disagreement over current standards of practice, but if successful, citizen science could improve communities, science, and decisionmaking.

  • Repealing or Replacing ACA Would Result in More Uninsured Veterans and Stress on VA Health System

    Sep 14, 2017

    Recent congressional proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of uninsured nonelderly veterans and further increase demand for VA health care. The effects would vary across states, according to research by student Mimi Shen (cohort '16), but the largest impacts would be felt in states that expanded Medicaid.

  • Variation in Cannabis Potency and Prices in a Newly Legal Market

    Sep 12, 2017

    In the state of Washington, the legal cannabis market is currently dominated by high-THC cannabis flower and features growing expenditures on extracts.

  • Wearable Technologies for Law Enforcement

    Sep 8, 2017

    Wearable technologies that could help officers in the field, such as flexible batteries and wireless charging, are available today at reasonable costs. Law enforcement agencies should work with manufacturers to provide input on future wearables.

  • A Framework for Estimating The Benefits of Resilience Projects

    Aug 1, 2017

    Policymakers, program practitioners, and investors who want to achieve the greatest possible benefits from resilience projects lack effective tools to estimate the net benefits of those projects. Existing approaches often do not provide a sufficient framework for estimating the benefits that might accrue, especially if a shock or stress does not occur.

  • Lessons from Israel's Wars in Gaza

    Jul 26, 2017

    The Israel Defense Force had to evolve to meet an adaptive and determined hybrid adversary during its wars in Gaza. Student Elizabeth Bartels (cohort '15) and alum/prof Shira Efron (cohort '11) found that the U.S. Army and the joint force can learn from the IDF's challenge of balancing intense international legal public scrutiny and the hard operational realities of urban warfare.

  • Pittsburgh's Options to Address Lead in Its Water

    Jul 18, 2017

    Pittsburgh is struggling to improve its aging water system. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and alum/professor Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) review the history and recent developments related to the use of lead pipes and the policy options for lead remediation currently being weighed by local decisionmakers.

  • Characterizing National Exposures to Infrastructure from Natural Disasters

    Jul 12, 2017

    Data and methods documentation for an analysis of how infrastructure systems - roads, the electric grid, ports, telecommunications networks, refineries, and others - are vulnerable to disruption from natural disasters.

  • How to Bolster Recruitment of Women in the Military

    Jun 28, 2017

    As ground combat jobs are transitioning to include women, efforts to improve the recruitment process are expanding. Having more female recruiters would help, as would outreach materials that counter stereotypes and highlight the roles women fill in the military, according to research by student Christina Steiner (cohort '09) and professors Doug Yeung, Chaitra Hardison, and Lawrence Hanser.

  • The Effects of Travel and Tourism on California's Economy

    Jun 27, 2017

    California's travel and tourism industry employs a diverse workforce that makes a meaningful contribution to the state's economy. Student Olena Bogdan (cohort '12) and professor Ed Keating find that, for some, the industry offers a stable career path with good wages and wage growth. For others, it's a launching point into other industries.

  • Provider Fraud in California Workers' Compensation

    Jun 26, 2017

    Workers' compensation fraud is thought to be one of the fastest growing forms of insurance fraud. One particular form of fraud involves the manipulation of rules and procedures by providers, particularly those delivering health care services and supplies.

  • 'Principal Pipelines' Can Be an Affordable Way to Improve Schools

    Jun 20, 2017

    Improving school leadership by better selecting, training, and evaluating principals can be an affordable way to reduce turnover and improve schools, according to research by Melody Harvey (cohort '12) and professor Susan Gates.

  • Inching Toward Reform: Trump's Deregulation and Its Implementation

    May 19, 2017

    How well does President Donald Trump's plans for a regulation roll-back address the concerns of those who have long supported regulatory reform, and how can agencies best tackle the challenges and opportunities of implementation?

  • Strategic Planning Tools for the Army Senior ROTC Program

    May 5, 2017

    Researchers created a program evaluation tool and a selection evaluation tool to help the Army evaluate existing ROTC programs and explore new market opportunities, keep up with changes in the college student population, and meet both near-term officer production goals as well as longer-term strategic objectives.

  • Prototype Tool Designed to Help Law Enforcement Use Data from Mobile Applications

    May 1, 2017

    Student Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) worked with alumni Anne Boustead ('11) and Steven Isley ('10) and professor Ed Balkovich to document a prototype tool called MIKE (the Mobile Information and Knowledge Ecosystem) that can help interested stakeholders — law enforcement, commercial enterprises, regulators, legislators, and the public (including advocacy groups) — better understand the mobile app ecosystem and the relationships among the data, its sources, and applicable legal constraints.