Featured Pardee RAND Research

Pardee RAND students and faculty — and even some alumni — contribute to RAND research. This page features selected reports and projects to which the Pardee RAND community has contributed.

  • Evaluation of Mental Health Service Act in L.A. County Shows Services Reaching Those in Need

    Mar 13, 2018

    Los Angeles County uses Mental Health Services Act funds programs to reach at-risk populations. Students Gulrez Shah Azhar and Margaret Chamberlin found that the county was able to offer services and prevention efforts that lowered both homelessness and the need for psychiatric hospitalizations, while improving employment and wellbeing.

  • The Science of Gun Policy

    Mar 2, 2018

    What does the scientific evidence tell us about the effects of gun policies? Students Eric Apaydin, John Speed Meyers, and Rouslan Karimov worked on the RAND Gun Policy in America initiative, coauthoring a report that assesses the available evidence for the effects of commonly proposed gun laws on firearm deaths, violent crime, suicide, the gun industry, hunting and sport shooting, and other outcomes.

  • Designing and Implementing Corequisite Models of Developmental Education

    Feb 23, 2018

    Alum Lindsey Daugherty (cohort '05) and students Diana Gehlhaus Carew ('15) and Alexandra Mendoza-Graf ('16) examined the implementation of integrated reading and writing corequisites—a reform to developmental education that accelerates students into college-level courses, while providing academic support—in Texas community colleges.

  • How Does U.S. Military Presence Affect Conflict?

    Feb 15, 2018

    Stationing U.S. forces can be an effective tool in deterring state aggression, but this doesn't appear to reduce the risk of intrastate conflict, according to research coauthored by student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14). There is also an important trade-off: U.S. troop presence may provoke more militarized activities short of war.

  • Evaluating Progress Toward Increasing Global Contraceptive Use

    Feb 5, 2018

    In 2013, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched two programs to help monitor progress toward a global goal to increase modern contraceptive use by 2020. Students Bill Gelfeld, Michele Abbott, Gabriela Armenta, Rouslan I. Karimov, Adeyemi Okunogbe, Uzaib Saya, and Mahlet A. Woldetsadik evaluated these programs and found opportunities for improvement.

  • Examining the Food-Energy-Water and Conflict Nexus

    Jan 31, 2018

    Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) used the Pardee RAND Food-Energy-Water (FEW) Index to identify a positive, significant correlation between FEW security and political stability, and reviewed the evidence for how each of these three types of resource insecurities affects political and social stability.

  • Obesity May Be 'Socially Contagious'

    Jan 25, 2018

    Alum Ashlesha Datar (cohort '99) and Prof. Nancy Nicosia found that people who move to a high-obesity area are more likely to become overweight or obese. This may be due, in part, to “social contagion.” Living in a community where obesity is more common may make inactivity, poor diet, and being overweight or obese more socially acceptable.

  • Principals Generally Satisfied with Teach For America Corps Members

    Jan 17, 2018

    Students Amanda Edelman (cohort '13) and Rachel Perera ('16) surveyed principals about Teach For America corps members at their schools. The responses were mostly positive, but the principals did express concern with corps members' classroom management skills and limited two-year commitment.

  • Estimating the Economic Benefit of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Research

    Jan 2, 2018

    Three case studies provide concrete illustrations of the ways in which National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health research could affect worker health and safety practices and outcomes, as well as some initial estimates of the economic benefit associated with those impacts.

  • L.A. County Homelessness Program Also Saves Government Money

    Dec 27, 2017

    Los Angeles County's Housing for Health program launched a permanent housing program for people experiencing homelessness. Student Melody Harvey and Profs. Sarah Hunter and Matthew Cefalu found that, for every $1 invested in the program, L.A. County saved $1.20 in reduced health care and social service costs.

  • Improving Children's Lives: Balancing Investments in Prevention and Treatment in the Child Welfare System

    Dec 11, 2017

    Increasing prevention and treatment improves children's experience and long-term outcomes while paying for itself by reducing lifetime child welfare system costs.

  • Improving Child Welfare Outcomes

    Dec 11, 2017

    Policies aimed at increasing prevention and kinship care in the child welfare system improve children's experience and long-term outcomes. This approach is also cost effective, reducing total spending by 3 to 7 percent.

  • How Does Efficiency Affect Cost and Quality in Physician Organizations?

    Dec 7, 2017

    Physician organizations (POs) vary widely in the quality of care they provide for the same cost. To improve value, sources of inefficiency should be identified and targeted for improvement.

  • International Commercial Drone Regulation and Drone Delivery Services

    Dec 5, 2017

    As unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) rapidly evolve, regulators are scrambling to keep up with new uses, capabilities, and technology. Understanding international drone legislation is critical to determine which countries will be the most open to the use of delivery drones and what precedent is set for late-acting countries.

  • Promising Approaches to Army Institutional Change

    Dec 5, 2017

    The U.S. Army faces challenges including behavioral health issues, misconduct, and adjustment to changing demographics. Student Adeyemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) and alum Ben Batorsky (cohort' 12) found that long-term solutions will require changes in Army culture and climate. Such changes are difficult, but promising strategies do exist.

  • Housing People Experiencing Homelessness May Save Money

    Dec 5, 2017

    Housing for Health provides permanent supportive housing to people in Los Angeles County with complex medical and behavioral health issues. Student Melody Harvey (cohort '12) found that, after one year, participants reported dramatic reductions in use of public services, such as emergency medical care, resulting in a net cost savings of 20 percent.

  • Early Childhood Programs Can Improve Outcomes and Outweigh Costs

    Nov 16, 2017

    Students Ashley Muchow (cohort '13) and Maya Buenaventura (cohort '14) worked with professors Jill Cannon, Lynne Karoly, and Rebecca Kilburn to review 115 early childhood interventions — including preschool, home visiting, parent education, and other approaches. They found that most programs have favorable effects on at least one child outcome, and most of the programs with benefit–cost analyses show positive returns.

  • U.S. Health System Should Prepare for Future Alzheimer's Treatments

    Nov 15, 2017

    Advanced clinical trials are underway for at least 10 promising therapies for Alzheimer's disease. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) found that the U.S. health care system lacks the capacity to rapidly move a treatment from approval into wide clinical use. Millions of people could miss out on transformative care if such a breakthrough occurs.

  • Employers and Colleges Could Plan Better for Future Oil and Natural Gas Workforce

    Oct 17, 2017

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to tap natural gas should bring long-term economic benefits to Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15) helped survey employers and educators to inform policy decisions on how best to expand and sustain the pool of workers with the needed knowledge and skills.

  • Evaluating Iowa's Proposed Stopgap Measure

    Oct 16, 2017

    To stabilize the state's individual health insurance market, Iowa proposed the Iowa Stopgap Measure (ISM). Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and colleagues say ISM modifications would increase the federal deficit, but decrease federal spending per enrollee.

  • Public Cord Blood Banks Provide Benefits Despite Drop in Use

    Sep 29, 2017

    U.S. umbilical cord blood banks are a valuable resource for patients and the research community. Research by student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) indicates their benefits far outweigh their costs and they should continue to receive federal support. Stakeholders could work together to strengthen the industry and improve the genetic diversity and quality of the national inventory.

  • Community Citizen Science Could Transform Science and Society

    Sep 27, 2017

    Community citizen science involves public participation in research to support interventional activities or policy change. Students Amanda F. Edelman and Therese Jones (both cohort '13) find that there is disagreement over current standards of practice, but if successful, citizen science could improve communities, science, and decisionmaking.

  • Repealing or Replacing ACA Would Result in More Uninsured Veterans and Stress on VA Health System

    Sep 14, 2017

    Recent congressional proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of uninsured nonelderly veterans and further increase demand for VA health care. The effects would vary across states, according to research by student Mimi Shen (cohort '16), but the largest impacts would be felt in states that expanded Medicaid.

  • Variation in Cannabis Potency and Prices in a Newly Legal Market

    Sep 12, 2017

    In the state of Washington, the legal cannabis market is currently dominated by high-THC cannabis flower and features growing expenditures on extracts.

  • Wearable Technologies for Law Enforcement

    Sep 8, 2017

    Wearable technologies that could help officers in the field, such as flexible batteries and wireless charging, are available today at reasonable costs. Law enforcement agencies should work with manufacturers to provide input on future wearables.