Featured Pardee RAND Research

Pardee RAND students and faculty — and even some alumni — contribute to RAND research. This page features selected reports and projects to which the Pardee RAND community has contributed.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in a video conference call with officials and public representatives of the region of Dagestan amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow, Russia May 18, 2020, photo by Alexei Nikolsky/Reuters

    How Russia Targets U.S. Elections

    Oct 1, 2020

    In this campaign season, Russia might try to manipulate U.S. voters through social media as it did in 2016, and new technologies have made these efforts easier. Russia's tactics aim to polarize Americans, create distrust, and paralyze the political process. Student Hilary Reininger ('16) and colleagues ask, what is the best defense against them?

  • A teacher showing a globe to her online elementary students, photo by ake1150sb/Getty Images

    Schools Weren't Prepared for a Crisis Like COVID-19

    Sep 29, 2020

    Before COVID-19, less than half of U.S. public schools had a written plan for dealing with a pandemic and only 38 states had publicly available school health emergency plans, according to research by Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) and RAND colleagues. How did schools' preparation affect their transitions to remote learning and principals' confidence in student achievement?

  • Boston Public School teacher Princess Bryant teaches her kindergarten class via video-conference from her apartment after schools were closed for the remainder of the school year because of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., April 28, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    The Digital Divide and COVID-19

    Sep 24, 2020

    Findings from a survey of U.S. teachers reveal how limited home internet access has been a barrier to providing instruction amid pandemic-related school closures. Student Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) and colleagues find the problem is particularly acute among high-poverty schools.

  • The game box cover for Hedgemony, design by Rick Penn-Kraus/RAND Corporation

    Hedgemony: A Game of Strategic Choices

    Sep 22, 2020

    Alum Yuna Wong (cohort '00) helped to develop this tabletop military strategy game in which players represent the United States, its allies, and its key competitors. They must use “hedging” strategies and decide how to best manage their resources and forces.

  • A radio telescope in front of a field of stars

    Alums Suggest Opportunities for Including Information Environment in USMC Wargames

    Jul 1, 2020

    Research by alumnae Yuna Wong (cohort '00) and Ellie Bartels ('15) finds wargaming is enjoying renewed prominence in the defense community, but the information environment remains underdeveloped and underrepresented in U.S. Marine Corps wargames.

  • Two female medical staff members looking at a laptop, photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

    Assessing Health Services and Primary Care Research

    Jun 30, 2020

    RAND reviewed federally-funded health services and primary care research, making recommendations for maximizing outcomes and future investments to better serve the needs of a complex and rapidly changing U.S. health care system.

  • Classmates preparing for exams in the library, photo by Prostock-Studio/Getty Images

    Understanding Media Use and Literacy in Schools

    Jun 29, 2020

    Schools can play a key role in fighting Truth Decay—the diminishing role of facts in U.S. public life—by teaching media literacy to students. Student Lynn Hu (cohort 19) and colleagues examine how much emphasis teachers and schools put on this subject.

  • Oakes McClenahan, 7, watches his teacher's recorded lesson on a computer at home, Seattle, Washington, March 27, 2020, photo by Jason Redmond/Reuters

    How Are Educators Teaching and Leading Through the Pandemic?

    Jun 22, 2020

    U.S. teachers and principals shifted quickly to support students with distance learning during the early weeks of the coronavirus crisis. Unfortunately, according to research by student Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) and colleagues, the pandemic is likely to make existing inequalities worse.

  • Two health care workers checking on a patient in quarantine, photo by tuachanwatthana/Getty Images

    Health Care Resource Allocation Decisionmaking During a Pandemic

    Jun 18, 2020

    Student Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and colleagues developed a Core Guidance Checklist that can help health systems and policymakers make choices about how to allocate scarce but lifesaving resources—for patients and for health care workers—during the COVID-19 crisis.

  • People stand in line at Harlem's Community Kitchen and Food Pantry in New York City, May 9, 2020, photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters

    How Are Americans Paying Their Bills During the Pandemic?

    Jun 3, 2020

    About one-third of U.S. households have experienced a decline in income as a result of COVID-19. Professors Katherine Carman and Shanthi Nataraj find that roughly 30 percent of these households—especially low-income, black, or Hispanic households—are having difficulties paying their bills.

  • A health insurance application on a tablet, photo by grinvalds/Getty Images

    Alum: How Would a Public Option on Health Insurance Affect Costs and Coverage?

    May 28, 2020

    Interest in a government-sponsored health insurance plan with publicly determined provider rates is growing. An analysis by Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and RAND colleagues looked at four such "public option" plans and found that lower provider payment rates would lower premiums. But the impact on enrollees would also depend on tax credits, and changes to the number of uninsured would be small.

  • Lisa Rowland, owner of Dog's Best Friend, trims the coat of a poodle as dog grooming services gradually reopen during the COVID-19 outbreak, in Pasadena, California, May 21, 2020, photo by Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

    Student Examines How Small Businesses Are Surviving the COVID-19 Pandemic

    May 22, 2020

    Small-business owners are facing many challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Diana Gehlhaus (cohort '15) helped research what kinds of policies might help them and what will they need to thrive once the immediate public health crisis has passed.

  • A woman checks her mobile phone next to a poster promoting a project of the Belt and Road in Colombo, Sri Lanka at China International Fair for Trade in Services in Beijing, China, May 28, 2019, photo by Jason Lee/Reuters

    Student Helps to Demystify the Belt and Road Initiative

    May 13, 2020

    China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) aims to connect its partner countries domestically and globally. Though the project appears to address a critical shortage of infrastructure in developing countries, it has been widely criticized. Keren Zhu (cohort '17) and colleagues explore what is at the heart of these critiques.

  • An ancient sculpture of a god's face superimposed over source code, images by Adolf and kentoh/Adobe Stock

    Student Examines How to Track and Disrupt the Looted Antiquities Trade

    May 12, 2020

    The sale of stolen cultural property provides an important funding source for terrorist organizations and rogue states. Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) helped to compile new evidence from numerous open sources that shows how the illicit antiquities market operates and ways law enforcement might be able to disrupt it.

  • Glass of whiskey with scales of justice in the background

    Alum and Prof Evaluate 24/7 Sobriety Program at Individual Level

    May 7, 2020

    24/7 Sobriety combines frequent alcohol testing with swift, certain, and modest sanctions for those who test positive for alcohol or miss a test. Alum Greg Midgette and Prof. Beau Kilmer used an instrumental variables approach for this study and found 24/7 reduced the probability a participant was rearrested or had probation revoked at 12 months by 49%.

  • Glass of alcohol, keys, and handcuffs on top of an arrest record with fingerprints, photo by TheCrimsonRibbon/Getty Images

    A Natural Experiment to Test the Effect of Sanction Certainty and Celerity on Substance-Impaired Driving: North Dakota's 24/7 Sobriety Program

    May 7, 2020

    Over half of participants ordered to abstain from substance use complete 24/7 Sobriety without a detected substance use event. At the county level, the program is associated with a 9% reduction in substance-impaired driving arrests.

  • COVID-19 patients in an intensive care unit, photo by JazzIRT/Getty Images

    Students Offer Hospitals Critical Care Surge Capacity Strategies for Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic

    May 5, 2020

    Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and Hamad Al Ibrahim ('18) worked with RAND researchers to present methods for creating critical care surge capacity in hospitals to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • State Policy Evaluation Tool

    Students Help Develop Tool for Policymakers to Manage COVID-19 Responses

    May 4, 2020

    State and local officials implemented a range of interventions to slow the spread of COVID-19, such as social distancing and school closures. Pedro Lima, Lawrence Baker, Keren Zhu, Michelle Priest, and Lynn Hu helped to develop a web-based tool to help leaders weigh both the public health and economic consequences of different approaches to lifting some of these measures.

  • A United Launch Alliance Delta IV-Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37B

    The Impact of the Air Force's Space Launch Acquisition Decisions

    Apr 28, 2020

    How could potential U.S. Air Force decisions in the near term affect domestic launch providers and the market in general? New launch market forecasts and vignettes illuminate potential strategies for U.S. firms.

  • U.S. Army Major Shandel Panneton and 1st Lieutenant Autumn Kruse verify patient census and bed status information at the Javits New York Medical Station which supports local hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak, in New York City, April 8, 2020, photo by Spc. Nathan Hammack/U.S. Army via Reuters

    Students Help Develop Interactive Tool for Strategizing Hospital Critical Care Capacity

    Apr 17, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is placing extraordinary strains on the U.S. medical system, especially hospitals. Hamad Al-Ibrahim (cohort '18) and Karishma Patel ('17) worked with Prof. Chris Nelson and RAND colleagues to develop an interactive tool hospitals can use to estimate their current critical care capacity and rapidly explore strategies for increasing it.

  • A teacher at a desk with a tablet and a laptop, photo by FluxFactory/Getty Images

    Student Explores What Digital Materials Teachers Use

    Apr 16, 2020

    Digital materials for lesson planning and instruction are becoming an increasingly important resource for teachers. Ashley Woo (cohort '18) and RAND colleagues surveyed English language arts, mathematics, and science teachers across the United States for insights on which materials they use and what they consider barriers to use.

  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Chinese Vice President Wang Qishan hit a gong at the fourth Israel-China Joint Committee on Innovation Cooperation meeting in Jerusalem, October 24, 2018, photo by Ronen Zvulun/Reuters

    Alum and Student Examine Security Risks of China's Investments in Israel

    Apr 7, 2020

    Chinese investments in Israeli high-tech companies and major infrastructure projects present distinct concerns for Israel and the United States, according to research by alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) and student Emily Haskell ('16). They could lead to leaks of sensitive technology and cyberespionage. And these risks could affect the U.S.-Israel relationship.

  • Hospital workers are seen near a tent erected to test for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York, March 19, 2020, photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters

    Students Contribute to New Tool to Help Health Officials Plan for COVID-19 Patient Surge

    Apr 3, 2020

    Hospitals are searching for ways to ramp up their surge capacity to provide critical care for the sickest COVID-19 patients. Students Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and Hamad Al-Ibrahim ('18) helped to develop a user-friendly calculator that enables decisionmakers at all levels to estimate current critical care capacity and rapidly explore strategies for increasing it.

  • Ambulances seen outside NYU Langone Hospital's Emergency entrance during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in New York City, March 31, 2020, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    Students: Promising Strategies for Creating Critical Care Capacity in U.S. Hospitals

    Apr 3, 2020

    Hospitals can prepare for a surge of patients critically ill with COVID-19, but it will require hospital leaders, practitioners, and regional officials to adopt drastic measures that challenge the standard way of providing care. Students Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and Hamad Al Ibrahim ('18) worked with RAND colleagues to develop a tool to help estimate current capacity and explore ways to increase it.

  • Group of people with their hands on top of one another, photo by PeopleImages/Getty Images

    Student Helps Evaluate the WhyWeRise Mental Health Campaign

    Apr 1, 2020

    Rebecca de Guttry (cohort '18) conducted interviews and analyzed a survey to evaluate WhyWeRise, a community engagement mental health campaign. The research indicates that the campaign reached at least 30 percent of Los Angeles County youth and mobilized them to improve social support for those experiencing mental health challenges.