Featured Pardee RAND Research

Pardee RAND students and faculty — and even some alumni — contribute to RAND research. This page features selected reports and projects to which the Pardee RAND community has contributed.

  • Supporters of a "Medicare for All" plan gather on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., September 13, 2017, photo by Yuri Gripas/Reuters

    Spending Estimates Under Medicare for All

    Apr 10, 2019

    Under a Medicare for All plan similar to some proposals being discussed in Congress, alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner calculate that total health expenditures would be an estimated 1.8 percent higher in 2019, relative to the status quo. While this is a small change in national spending, the federal government's health spending would increase substantially, rising by an estimated 221 percent.

  • A principal meeting with teachers, photo by Claire Holt/The Wallace Foundation

    Principal Pipelines Benefit Students and Reduce Principal Turnover

    Apr 8, 2019

    Six urban districts implemented principal pipelines, a strategic approach to the hiring, preparation, evaluation, and support of school leaders. Student Emilio R. Chavez-Herrerias (cohort '14) found that the efforts were feasible, affordable, and effective. The schools not only outperformed comparison schools in both math and reading, but they also improved principal retention.

  • Petty Officer 1st Class Krystyna Duffy, a boatswain's mate assigned to Coast Guard Station Golden Gate in San Francisco, drives a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat near the Golden Gate Bridge, February 8, 2018, photo by PO3 Sarah Wi/U.S. Coast Guard

    Alum Examines Why Women Leave the Coast Guard, and What Could Encourage Them to Stay

    Mar 29, 2019

    Women leave the Coast Guard at higher rates than men. Through focus groups, alum David Schulker (cohort '07) uncovered concerns about work environment, career issues, and personal life matters. More inclusive personnel policies could help the Coast Guard address these concerns and retain more women.

  • Engineers are using this specially constructed five-story building to study how high-value buildings, such as hospitals and data centers, can remain operational after an earthquake, in San Diego, California, April 17, 2012, photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

    Seismic Safety Upgrades May Cost California Hospitals Billions

    Mar 28, 2019

    David Catt (cohort '16) worked with alum Daniel Waxman ('10) and several professors to estimate the cost to California hospitals of seismic retrofitting. The upgrades could cost between $34 billion and $143 billion statewide, but a third of hospitals are already in some form of financial distress.

  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands ahead of their talks at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China, March 21, 2017, photo by Etienne Oliveau/Reuters/Pool

    How Has the Israel-China Relationship Evolved?

    Mar 21, 2019

    Since the early 2000s, relations between China and Israel have expanded in areas like diplomacy, trade, investment, construction, educational partnerships, scientific cooperation, and tourism. Alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) and student Emily Haskel ('16) examine what challenges the relationship poses for Israel and the United States.

  • Patient consulting with his doctor via videochat over his laptop, photo by Henfaes/Getty Images

    Experiences of Medicaid Programs and Health Centers in Implementing Telehealth

    Mar 8, 2019

    Safety-net providers underuse telehealth due to a range of policy, organizational, and logistical barriers. Examining the use of telehealth by federal programs in seven states, researchers identified common themes and considerations for policymakers.

  • An aerial view of the San Francisco Bay delta, photo by Andrei / Adobe Stock

    Decision Support Tool for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Levees Investment Strategy

    Mar 7, 2019

    The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta faces complex and varied flood risks. Possible investments to mitigate these risks are numerous, and they will affect Delta risks differently. A decision support tool developed by alum David Groves (cohort '01) and student James Syme ('18) aided the Delta Stewardship Council in developing a Delta Levees Investment Strategy.

  • Doctor sitting at his desk in his office, photo by SolStock/Getty Images

    Rural Physicians Perspectives on the Medicare Quality Payment Program

    Mar 5, 2019

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently launched its Quality Payment Program (QPP), which changes how physicians are paid under Medicare. Student Nabeel Qureshi (cohort '18) and colleagues interviewed rural physicians to determine if their practices could successfully participate and how the program could be modified to support small rural practices.

  • South Korean soldiers conduct a pass in review during a military parade to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the South Korean-U.S. alliance in Seoul, South Korea, October 1, 2013

    North Korea's Expanding Nuclear Program Drives a Complex Set of Problems

    Jan 11, 2019

    North Korean provocations and threats have created an unstable environment on the Korean Peninsula. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) and colleagues say the U.S. and its allies must attend to four interconnected problems. Failure to prepare will increase the chance of miscalculation and constrain options to reduce the likelihood or gravity of future conflicts.

  • A judge holding a gavel in a courtroom

    Holistic Representation Can Reduce Incarceration and Save Taxpayer Dollars

    Jan 11, 2019

    Alum Maya Buenaventura (cohort '14) and Prof. James Anderson found that a public defense model that seeks to address the underlying challenges and needs of poor offenders prevented more than 1 million days of incarceration over 10 years, without reducing public safety.

  • Storm drain putflow, stormwater, water drainage, waste water or effluent

    Estimating Future Water Demand for San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District

    Dec 28, 2018

    Water resources management is becoming increasingly challenging in Southern California. Alum David Groves (cohort '01) and student David Catt ('16) evaluated the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District’s first step in a comprehensive effort to assess its demand projections.

  • Nurse helping mother patient fill out paperwork in clinic waiting room

    Expanding Enrollment Without the Individual Mandate

    Dec 27, 2018

    Recent changes to the Affordable Care Act, including the elimination of the individual mandate penalty, may reduce enrollment in the individual market. But research by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner finds that, even with these changes, options exist for increasing health coverage.

  • Construction worker helping an injured worker walk

    Monitoring Wage Loss for Injured Workers in California

    Dec 27, 2018

    Nicholas Broten (cohort '15) and RAND colleagues compared earnings losses for California workers who suffered a workplace injury or illness in 2014-15 against previous trends. They found that earnings have increased slightly but remain lower than the pre-recession average.

  • Italian MP Marietta Tidei talks with students at a school for vulnerable Syrian refugees in Gaziantep, Turkey

    Challenges to the Integration of Syrian Refugees

    Dec 18, 2018

    The successful resettlement of Syrian refugees is dependent on political commitment coupled with public support and community engagement, according to research by student Gabriela Armenta (cohort '15) and alum Mahal Woldetsadik ('13). Social and economic policies to address the crisis require a combined effort in planning, implementing, monitoring, and assessing initiatives, and sharing data with stakeholders.

  • A 3D rendering of a chess board on a globe

    What Does the Emerging Era of International Competition Look Like?

    Dec 17, 2018

    There is a general expectation of a new era of strategic competition, characterized by growing rivalry in the political, economic, and military spheres. But Tim McDonald (cohort '16), Prof. Michael Mazarr, and RAND colleagues found there is no consensus on what that means or what forms it could take. Theory and history can shed light on the coming era.

  • Workers in a textile factory in Igdir, Turkey, May 20, 2017

    Win-Win Solutions for Syrian Refugees—and Their Hosts

    Dec 13, 2018

    Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan have generously received the majority of Syrian refugees. Many are working, but their sheer numbers have strained local labor markets, public services, and social harmony. Gursel Aliyev (cohort '13) worked with professors Krishna Kumar and Kathryn Bouskill to explore which policies might help create new economic opportunities for both the refugees and host-nation workers.

  • Close up portrait of a African American woman holding a baby girl

    The Welcome Baby Program: An Implementation and Outcomes Evaluation

    Dec 11, 2018

    Findings from an evaluation of First 5 LA's Welcome Baby universal home visiting program showed significant variation across sites, but generally positive responses from participants. Melissa Felician (cohort '13), Maya Buenaventura ('14), and Lauren Davis ('15) contributed to the evaluation.

  • Man using a laptop in a dark room

    Assessing Online Campaigns Countering Violent Extremism

    Dec 10, 2018

    Efforts to counter violent extremism online have grown, but measuring their impact is complicated. An assessment of one such campaign by Kurt Klein (cohort '16) finds that individuals searching for violent jihadist or far-right content clicked on ads that offered alternative narratives at a rate on par with industry standards.

  • Photo of the WeRise event

    Evaluation of Los Angeles County's Mental Health Community Engagement Campaign

    Nov 14, 2018

    A community engagement campaign sought to increase awareness of mental health access as a civil rights issue and to increase civic engagement. Student Lauren Davis (cohort '15) and colleagues found that youth who took part showed increased supportive and understanding attitudes toward mental illness, and empowerment and mobilization toward activism around mental health issues.

  • Group of people standing and holding hands

    Evaluating Savings Associated with LA County's Mental Health Programs

    Oct 30, 2018

    Los Angeles used its Mental Health Services Act funds to expand access to Full Service Partnership programs. Student Gulrez Azhar (cohort '14) and colleagues estimated that, over a five-year period, program outcomes were associated with $82.9 million cost savings, a 24 percent reduction in government spending.

  • A principal and teacher walking in a school corridor

    Universities Are Improving Training of Future School Principals

    Oct 30, 2018

    Student Rachel Perera worked with Prof. Susan Gates and RAND colleagues to evaluate the University Principal Preparation Initiative, in which seven universities are beginning to change their principal preparation programs to better reflect the real-world demands of the job.

  • A Palestinian woman drags a cart loaded with water containers after filling them from a public tap in the city of Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip, February 28, 2017

    How to Solve the Water Crisis in Gaza

    Sep 26, 2018

    Gaza has long had water and sanitation challenges, but today it's in a state of emergency. Research by alumni Shira Efron (cohort '11) and Jordan Fischbach ('04), student Rouslan Karimov ('15), and Prof. Melinda Moore finds that the crisis could be resolved through infrastructure investment, but political complications and other barriers remain.

  • View from above of a male patient talking to a receptionist in a doctor's office

    Alumni Evaluate Health Care Payment Reform Pilot

    Aug 31, 2018

    California's Global Payment Program seeks to improve health care for the state's uninsured by providing funds for both traditional and non-traditional services, settings, and providers. Alumni Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Denise Quigley ('91) conducted a mid-point evaluation that found broad improvement.

  • Three male workers wearing personal safety equipment in a factory

    How Can Workers' Compensation Systems Promote Occupational Safety and Health?

    Aug 31, 2018

    Student Nicolas Broten (cohort '15) helped assess the challenges that workers' compensation stakeholder groups have identified, as well as which policy options and research efforts are most important for reforming workers' compensation policy to promote the well-being of workers.

  • Refueling operations in a KC-135 Stratotanker

    Is the USAF Flying Force Large Enough?

    Aug 28, 2018

    The U.S. military has mostly operated at a high operational tempo since the end of the Cold War, and there appears to be no significant reduction in demand on the horizon. This report draws on historical data to quantify gaps in the U.S. Air Force's capacity to meet potential future demands.