Pardee RAND Blog Posts

Students and faculty of Pardee RAND frequently author blog posts for RAND.org based on their research or expertise; these posts are featured here. Note: clicking on a link will take you to RAND's website.

Student Blog Posts

Here we list the last 10 student-authored blog posts. Visit the Student Blog Posts page for a complete list.

  • How Federal Policy Could Help Water and Wastewater Utilities

    Jan 16, 2018

    Debra Knopman, David Catt

    The federal government could address the root causes of infrastructure problems more effectively than just spending money with the hope that it might do some good, write student David Catt (cohort '16) and Prof. Debra Knopman. A better approach might be to devote scarce resources to fixing what actually isn't working well in the nation's approach to managing, funding and financing infrastructure.

  • Moving Countries, Seeking Refuge from Climate Change

    Dec 19, 2017

    Gulrez Shah Azhar

    By the middle of this century, experts estimate that climate change is likely to displace between 150 and 300 million people. Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort '14) says it is daunting to envision such large flows of people, but that is why the global community should start doing so now.

  • Is Iron Dome a Poisoned Chalice? Strategic Risks from Tactical Success

    Nov 29, 2017

    Elizabeth M. Bartels

    While Iron Dome's past success in defending Israel makes it a tempting solution to future challenges, it does have shortcomings. Student Elizabeth Bartels (cohort '15) says this becomes even more serious when considering using the system in Korea, where the threat posed is substantially greater, and the targeted terrain substantially harder to defend.

  • How Hot Is Too Hot? Rising Temperatures and the Workplace

    Nov 16, 2017

    Gulrez Shah Azhar

    Climate change is here. Future extreme heat waves are a given and will likely grow in intensity, geographic reach, and duration. Student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort 14) says plans need to be made now to ensure survival of the poorest, to protect outdoor workers and to adapt economic planning to what is increasingly becoming a hotter planet.

  • Adding Shots on Target: Wargaming Beyond the Game

    Oct 9, 2017

    Elizabeth M. Bartels

    Figuring out what the future may look like—and what concepts and technology we should invest in now to prepare—is hard. Student Ellie Bartels (cohort '15) considers how the wargaming community can build a cycle of research to help understand what these paths might be.

  • Doing More with Less: Lessons from Cuba's Health Care System

    High U.S. health care costs do not yield corresponding health outcomes for its citizens. But students Claire O'Hanlon (cohort '13) and Melody Harvey ('12) note that Cuba, for less than a tenth of U.S. costs, has attained comparable outcomes on many indicators, such as life expectancy and infant mortality. Cuba prioritizes primary care and prevention and addresses social determinants of health.

  • Joint Military Exercises Distract from Complex Russia-Belarus Relationship

    Analysts and military leaders have concerns that Russia will use the Zapad 2017 exercise in Belarus as a smokescreen to put personnel and equipment in place, and keep it there. But student Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) argues that the deep ties and history of cooperation between the two states make the chances of that happening unlikely.

  • Another Casualty of Climate Change: Peace

    Aug 15, 2017

    Gulrez Shah Azhar

    Student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort ' 14) says the connection between human conflict and climate change is no mere coincidence. Drought, temperature and tensions rise in tandem, with the implicit threat of violent conflict not far behind.

  • Getting (Solar) Electricity Pricing Right

    For many U.S. homeowners, an investment in rooftop solar is becoming a cost-competitive alternative to purchasing grid electricity. But student Benjamin Smith (cohort '15) and professors Nick Burger and Aimee Curtright note that, as demand soars, states are struggling to adapt a 20th-century electrical grid to 21st-century supply and demand, leading to confusion and cost uncertainty.

  • A Colombian Survivor's Crusade to Strengthen Punishment for Acid Attacks

    Jul 17, 2017

    Mahlet A. Woldetsadik

    Acid attacks—one of the most extreme forms of violence against women and girls—have devastating, lifelong consequences for survivors. Student Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) writes that governments can, like Colombia, impose tougher punishments on attackers and support programs to build survivors' self-confidence.

Faculty Blog Posts

Here we list the last 10 faculty-authored blog posts. Visit the Faculty Blog Posts page for a complete list.