Pardee RAND Blog Posts

Students and faculty of Pardee RAND frequently author blog posts for RAND.org based on their research or expertise; these posts are featured here. Note: clicking on a link will take you to RAND's website.

Student Blog Posts

Here we list the last 10 student-authored blog posts. Visit the Student Blog Posts page for a complete list.

  • Staying Cool—as the Globe Warms

    Apr 23, 2018

    Gulrez Shah Azhar

    Studies suggest that the heat of the future will exceed human coping capacity. Student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort '14) says that taking advantage of smart technology, inexpensive traditional methods that require little energy use, and innovative energy-efficient technologies could provide a sustainable path forward in heat-challenged regions.

  • Europe's Great Challenge: Integrating Syrian Refugees

    Since March, 2011, close to 1 million Syrian refugees have requested asylum in European countries, with Germany being the primary destination. Students Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) and Gabriela Armenta ('15) say social and economic policies to deal with the refugee crisis will require collaborative planning, monitoring, and assessment efforts to be successful.

  • Bridging the Growing College Divide Among Young Americans

    Apr 13, 2018

    Diana Gehlhaus Carew

    Over the last decade, more Americans age 25 to 34 earned four-year college and graduate degrees, but the number of those without college degrees also increased. Student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15) says new ways of communicating educational options and outcomes to young people are needed.

  • Tackling Gender-Based Violence Among Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

    Mar 22, 2018

    Mahlet A. Woldetsadik

    Student Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) writes that increased poverty and major shifts in traditional gender roles for Syrian refugees have worsened interpersonal tensions, increased the risk of domestic violence, and caused challenges for aid workers.

  • Can Dirty-Air Discontent in New Delhi Push India Toward Greener Days?

    Mar 22, 2018

    Gulrez Shah Azhar

    The dirty downside to India's dramatic economic growth is New Delhi's horrific off-the-charts air pollution, writes student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort '14). Public health officials comparing the harms of breathing in India's capital to smoking dozens of cigarettes a day. How bad must things get before Indians demand change and make it stick?

  • One Belt, One Road, One Ruler: China Term Limits Ban Imperils Progress

    Mar 6, 2018

    Bill Gelfeld

    The abolition of presidential term limits in China represents a sea change in Communist Party politics and signals the consolidation of personalist rule by President Xi Jinping. Student Bill Gelfeld (cohort '14) explains that deviations from term limits are deleterious for good governance, political rights, and accountability.

  • What Next for China-Pakistan Relations?

    The recent downgrade in U.S.-Pakistan relations will present both opportunities and challenges for China, writes student Keren Zhu (cohort '17). Beijing can use the recent strain to promote a new model of international development, but must be wary of becoming the sole external power responsible for maintaining stability in the region.

  • How Federal Policy Could Help Water and Wastewater Utilities

    Jan 16, 2018

    Debra Knopman, David Catt

    The federal government could address the root causes of infrastructure problems more effectively than just spending money with the hope that it might do some good, write student David Catt (cohort '16) and Prof. Debra Knopman. A better approach might be to devote scarce resources to fixing what actually isn't working well in the nation's approach to managing, funding and financing infrastructure.

  • Moving Countries, Seeking Refuge from Climate Change

    Dec 19, 2017

    Gulrez Shah Azhar

    By the middle of this century, experts estimate that climate change is likely to displace between 150 and 300 million people. Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort '14) says it is daunting to envision such large flows of people, but that is why the global community should start doing so now.

  • Is Iron Dome a Poisoned Chalice? Strategic Risks from Tactical Success

    Nov 29, 2017

    Elizabeth M. Bartels

    While Iron Dome's past success in defending Israel makes it a tempting solution to future challenges, it does have shortcomings. Student Elizabeth Bartels (cohort '15) says this becomes even more serious when considering using the system in Korea, where the threat posed is substantially greater, and the targeted terrain substantially harder to defend.

Faculty Blog Posts

Here we list the last 10 faculty-authored blog posts. Visit the Faculty Blog Posts page for a complete list.

  • How to Increase Participation in Workplace Health and Wellbeing Initiatives

    May 10, 2018

    Christian Van Stolk

    Many employers are actively looking at ways to improve health and wellbeing in their workplaces. Prof. Chris van Stolk writes that increasing employee participation in health and wellness programs requires strategies to address health risks, engagement with staff, and buy-in and support from management.

  • The Human Side of Artificial Intelligence: Q&A with Prof. Osonde Osoba

    May 1, 2018

    Prof. Osonde Osoba has been exploring AI since age 15. He says it's less about the intelligence and more about being able to capture how humans think. He is developing AI to improve planning and is also studying fairness in algorithmic decisionmaking in insurance pricing and criminal justice.

  • Gaza on the Brink

    Mar 9, 2018

    Shira Efron

    The combined risk of violence and pandemic in Gaza makes this small coastal enclave a ticking time bomb, writes Prof. Shira Efron (alum, cohort '11). While neither Israel nor the U.S. has the solutions to all of Gaza's water and health woes, the United States' decision to withhold funding to the U.N. Relief and Works Agency could only make things worse.

  • Open Science and a Culture of Health: You Two Should Talk

    By working together, writes Prof. Sean Grant, the Culture of Health and Open Science movements could increase their potential to accelerate the use of scientific evidence to address impediments to population health and collective well-being.

  • 'Alexa, What Do You Know About Me, and Who Are You Telling?'

    Mar 1, 2018

    Professors Osonde Osoba and Bill Welser, with RAND colleague Rebecca Balebako, discussed the prevalence of artificial intelligence and how it affects privacy. They raised questions about fairness and equity in regard to privacy and data use, but also highlighted positive trends and developments in the evolving AI-privacy landscape.

  • The Long Game on Infrastructure

    Feb 20, 2018

    Debra Knopman, Martin Wachs

    The Trump administration recently announced its Legislative Outline for Rebuilding Infrastructure in America. But with its lack of new federal funding, write Profs. Debra Knopman and Martin Wachs, the plan may not be the best path to fixing America's most serious regional, national and long-term problems.

  • Where Will ISIS Seek to Establish Its Next Safe Haven?

    Many of ISIS's surviving fighters will seek out new battlefields to continue waging jihad, writes Prof. Colin Clarke. By coordinating with its allies around the globe, the U.S. could work to help alleviate the conditions that lead states to fail, making them less appealing as sanctuaries where terrorists can rest, rearm, and recuperate.

  • How Will Cannabis Legalization Affect Alcohol Consumption?

    How will legalization of recreational marijuana affect alcohol consumption? Will drinking go down because people substitute cannabis for alcohol? Or will drinking go up because cannabis and alcohol complement each other? Prof. Beau Kilmer says these questions have important implications.

  • The Diminishing Role of Facts in American Public Life

    Prof. Jennifer Kavanagh and RAND president Michael Rich write that, without agreement about objective facts and a common understanding of and respect for data and analytical interpretations of those data, it becomes nearly impossible to have the types of meaningful policy debates that form the foundation of democracy.

  • How Federal Policy Could Help Water and Wastewater Utilities

    Jan 16, 2018

    Debra Knopman, David Catt

    The federal government could address the root causes of infrastructure problems more effectively than just spending money with the hope that it might do some good, write student David Catt (cohort '16) and Prof. Debra Knopman. A better approach might be to devote scarce resources to fixing what actually isn't working well in the nation's approach to managing, funding and financing infrastructure.