Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Drones Could Deliver Change to Africa

    Nov 17, 2017

    Drones have potential on the African continent to transform urban and rural infrastructure and enhance agricultural productivity, writes alum Shira Efron (cohort '11). But deployment of drones in Africa still faces technological, economic, social, and legal and regulatory challenges.

  • How Hot Is Too Hot? Rising Temperatures and the Workplace

    Nov 16, 2017

    Climate change is here. Future extreme heat waves are a given and will likely grow in intensity, geographic reach and duration. Student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort 14) says plans need to be made now to ensure survival of the poorest, to protect outdoor workers and to adapt economic planning to what is increasingly becoming a hotter planet.

  • Early Childhood Programs Can Improve Outcomes and Outweigh Costs

    Nov 16, 2017

    Students Ashley Muchow (cohort '13) and Maya Buenaventura (cohort '14) worked with professors Jill Cannon, Lynne Karoly, and Rebecca Kilburn to review 115 early childhood interventions — including preschool, home visiting, parent education, and other approaches. They found that most programs have favorable effects on at least one child outcome, and most of the programs with benefit–cost analyses show positive returns.

  • U.S. Health System Should Prepare for Future Alzheimer's Treatments

    Nov 15, 2017

    Advanced clinical trials are underway for at least 10 promising therapies for Alzheimer's disease. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) found that the U.S. health care system lacks the capacity to rapidly move a treatment from approval into wide clinical use. Millions of people could miss out on transformative care if such a breakthrough occurs.

  • The Looming Pension Crisis

    Nov 8, 2017

    California leads the nation in pension underfunding. The state government has $464.4 billion in unfunded liabilities — the difference between resources that will be available in the state's pension fund and what will be owed to retiring employees. Executive Vice Dean Dan Grunfeld explains that, as dire as the problem is now, it could double over the next 12 years.

  • What Does the 19th Party Congress Mean for the PLA?

    Oct 18, 2017

    The People's Liberation Army has a lot at stake in the Chinese Communist Party Congress that started today, writes Professor Timothy Heath. In addition to changes in military leadership, the reports issued at a Party Congress invariably contain directives to the military which can add impetus to ongoing initiatives.

  • Employers and Colleges Could Plan Better for Future Oil and Natural Gas Workforce

    Oct 17, 2017

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to tap natural gas should bring long-term economic benefits to Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15) helped survey employers and educators to inform policy decisions on how best to expand and sustain the pool of workers with the needed knowledge and skills.

  • Evaluating Iowa's Proposed Stopgap Measure

    Oct 16, 2017

    To stabilize the state's individual health insurance market, Iowa proposed the Iowa Stopgap Measure (ISM). Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and colleagues say ISM modifications would increase the federal deficit, but decrease federal spending per enrollee.

  • China's Field of Dreams in Pakistan

    Oct 16, 2017

    China is four years into joint planning and construction of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, from Kashgar, China to the Pakistani port of Gwadar. Professor Rafiq Dossani asks, What are the benefits for China and Pakistan and what do they mean for future growth in the region?

  • Adding Shots on Target: Wargaming Beyond the Game

    Oct 9, 2017

    Figuring out what the future may look like—and what concepts and technology we should invest in now to prepare—is hard. Student Ellie Bartels (cohort '15) considers how the wargaming community can build a cycle of research to help understand what these paths might be.

  • Doing More with Less: Lessons from Cuba's Health Care System

    Oct 6, 2017

    High U.S. health care costs do not yield corresponding health outcomes for its citizens. But students Claire O'Hanlon (cohort '13) and Melody Harvey ('12) note that Cuba, for less than a tenth of U.S. costs, has attained comparable outcomes on many indicators, such as life expectancy and infant mortality. Cuba prioritizes primary care and prevention and addresses social determinants of health.

  • The Intersection of Algorithms and an Individual's Rights

    Sep 29, 2017

    Data collection, and our reliance on it, have evolved extremely rapidly. The resulting algorithms have proved invaluable for organizing, evaluating and utilizing information. Our new executive vice dean, Dan Grunfeld, poses the question: How do individuals' rights come in to play, when data about their lives is compiled to create algorithms, and the resulting tools are applied to judge them?

  • Public Cord Blood Banks Provide Benefits Despite Drop in Use

    Sep 29, 2017

    U.S. umbilical cord blood banks are a valuable resource for patients and the research community. Research by student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) indicates their benefits far outweigh their costs and they should continue to receive federal support. Stakeholders could work together to strengthen the industry and improve the genetic diversity and quality of the national inventory.

  • Community Citizen Science Could Transform Science and Society

    Sep 27, 2017

    Community citizen science involves public participation in research to support interventional activities or policy change. Students Amanda F. Edelman and Therese Jones (both cohort '13) find that there is disagreement over current standards of practice, but if successful, citizen science could improve communities, science, and decisionmaking.

  • Savings from a Single-Payer Health System Would Not Be Automatic

    Sep 26, 2017

    Polls have shown increasing public support for a single-payer system in the U.S., writes alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12). Yet there is no agreement on how to set up and pay for a single-payer system or even how much it would cost.

  • Do Americans Expect Too Much from Health Insurance?

    Sep 23, 2017

    Americans expect affordable coverage for pre-existing conditions, access to routine services, and for the health care system to protect them from financial risk from accidents or illness. As a product designed primarily for risk protection, insurance may not be the most efficient or affordable approach to achieving these objectives, write professors Christine Eibner and Katherine Grace Carman.

  • Repealing or Replacing ACA Would Result in More Uninsured Veterans and Stress on VA Health System

    Sep 14, 2017

    Recent congressional proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of uninsured nonelderly veterans and further increase demand for VA health care. The effects would vary across states, according to research by student Mimi Shen (cohort '16), but the largest impacts would be felt in states that expanded Medicaid.

  • Joint Military Exercises Distract from Complex Russia-Belarus Relationship

    Sep 13, 2017

    Analysts and military leaders have concerns that Russia will use the Zapad 2017 exercise in Belarus as a smokescreen to put personnel and equipment in place, and keep it there. But student Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) argues that the deep ties and history of cooperation between the two states make the chances of that happening unlikely.

  • Beyond Strategic Patience with North Korea: What Comes Next?

    Sep 8, 2017

    North Korea says that nuclear weapons are essential to regime survival. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) says the United States should figure out how to persuade the North Korean regime that it is less likely to survive by posing a nuclear threat than by cooperating with the international community.

  • Pardee RAND Rolls Out Policy Design Studios

    Sep 6, 2017

    A “studio,” normally thought of as a space where visual or performance artists work, is also a place for integrating knowledge, tools, and skills within an atmosphere of experimentation. Because policies must be imagined, designed, and understood within the context of social systems, Pardee RAND is integrating studios into the core curriculum this fall.

  • Dardia to Represent Alumni on Board of Governors

    Sep 5, 2017

    Michael Dardia (cohort '89) will join the Pardee RAND Board of Governors in November as the new alumni representative. He recently participated in a Q&A session with the School's new development officer.

  • Campaign for Fair Food Makes a Real Difference

    Aug 25, 2017

    The Fair Food Program protects farmworkers while providing corporations with transparency in their supply chains and tremendous brand protection, writes Dean Susan Marquis. It has been widely recognized for improving agricultural working conditions and for changing the culture of America's farm fields.

  • What Emerging Research Says About the Promise of Personalized Learning

    Aug 16, 2017

    Personalized learning holds promise as an innovation that can lead to improved educational outcomes for students. But Prof. John Pane writes that implementers should have modest expectations for the magnitude of the benefits, and patience for the full benefits to emerge.

  • Another Casualty of Climate Change: Peace

    Aug 15, 2017

    Student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort ' 14) says the connection between human conflict and climate change is no mere coincidence. Drought, temperature and tensions rise in tandem, with the implicit threat of violent conflict not far behind.

  • Pardee RAND Welcomes Executive Vice Dean

    Aug 15, 2017

    Daniel Grunfeld joined Pardee RAND on August 14 as Executive Vice Dean for Strategy and Partnerships. In this new position, he will work closely with Dean Susan Marquis and others to help direct the school’s strategic direction, including developing a new network of institutional partners and philanthropic support to advance the school’s reimagined design and vision for the future.