Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Pittsburgh's Options to Address Lead in Its Water

    Jul 18, 2017

    Pittsburgh is struggling to improve its aging water system. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and alum/professor Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) review the history and recent developments related to the use of lead pipes and the policy options for lead remediation currently being weighed by local decisionmakers.

  • A Colombian Survivor's Crusade to Strengthen Punishment for Acid Attacks

    Jul 17, 2017

    Acid attacks—one of the most extreme forms of violence against women and girls—have devastating, lifelong consequences for survivors. Student Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) writes that governments can, like Colombia, impose tougher punishments on attackers and support programs to build survivors' self-confidence.

  • Navigating the Uncertain Path to Decarbonization

    Jul 11, 2017

    Deep decarbonization can reduce the risk of climate change, and it offers opportunities to reimagine energy, transportation, and infrastructure. But Prof. Robert Lempert says it could also fail in many ways. Diverse, independent actors need a shared understanding of its complexity and deep uncertainty to design a solution to this challenge.

  • Ingredients for Health Care Reform

    Jul 10, 2017

    Despite their differences, the Affordable Care Act and the current proposals to replace it take a similar approach to providing health insurance. Prof. Christine Eibner asks, What might some alternatives look like? And how could they provide coverage to more Americans?

  • Lessons for First Responders on the Front Lines of Terrorism

    Jul 10, 2017

    Given the persistent risk of terrorist attacks, it is critical to learn from past incidents to prepare for future ones, writes prof. Chris Nelson. Medical and nonmedical first responders need more training in basic lifesaving skills. Open communication lines such as a dedicated radio frequency could help responders better coordinate. Disaster drills are also essential.

  • Getting the Lead Out of Pittsburgh's Water

    Jul 3, 2017

    Without an aggressive long-term strategy for replacing service lines, and collaboration among the water authority, public officials, and residents, lead in Pittsburgh's water will persist, writes professor (and alum) Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04).

  • How to Bolster Recruitment of Women in the Military

    Jun 28, 2017

    As ground combat jobs are transitioning to include women, efforts to improve the recruitment process are expanding. Having more female recruiters would help, as would outreach materials that counter stereotypes and highlight the roles women fill in the military, according to research by student Christina Steiner (cohort '09) and professors Doug Yeung, Chaitra Hardison, and Lawrence Hanser.

  • The Effects of Travel and Tourism on California's Economy

    Jun 27, 2017

    California's travel and tourism industry employs a diverse workforce that makes a meaningful contribution to the state's economy. Student Olena Bogdan (cohort '12) and professor Ed Keating find that, for some, the industry offers a stable career path with good wages and wage growth. For others, it's a launching point into other industries.

  • Spring 2017 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Jun 21, 2017

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about the six new Pardee RAND analytic Methods Centers, Dean Susan Marquis' visit to China (with alum Hui Wang, cohort '88), student presenters and moderators at the regional APPAM conference, and more.

  • 'Principal Pipelines' Can Be an Affordable Way to Improve Schools

    Jun 20, 2017

    Improving school leadership by better selecting, training, and evaluating principals can be an affordable way to reduce turnover and improve schools, according to research by Melody Harvey (cohort '12) and professor Susan Gates.

  • A 'Learning System' in Behavioral Health Can Help in Sharing Best Practices, Innovations

    May 30, 2017

    Leveraging technological advances to make better use of the best available data could help rein in healthcare costs and improve both quality and safety, writes alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). This makes sense whether the health care being delivered is physical or behavioral.

  • How to Navigate Public-Private Partnerships in Higher Ed

    May 26, 2017

    Universities are partnering with private companies that have the resources to help them compete in the online learning market and maximize student enrollment. Professors Rita Karam and Charles Goldman consider, do their different missions — providing high-quality education and making a profit — dilute the quality of the courses?

  • How Uganda Could Benefit from a Center for Food Innovation

    May 23, 2017

    A training and innovation center that trains and certifies street food vendors to address issues related to food hygiene, safety, and quality would accelerate the growth of a new Ugandan cuisine that capitalizes on nutritious local ingredients in a sustainable manner, write student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and professor Deborah Cohen.

  • Reforms to the U.S. Child Welfare System Could Save $12 Billion and Improve Outcomes

    May 23, 2017

    The United States could improve long-term outcomes and reduce child welfare system costs by $12.3 billion by striking a better balance between programs to prevent child maltreatment and those that offer services for kids who have already suffered from abuse, according to research by students Ifeanyi Edochie and Lauren Davis (both cohort '15) and professor Jeanne Ringel.

  • Is College Worth the Expense? Yes, It Is

    May 22, 2017

    Many American students struggle with the soaring cost of higher education, and for many college-going students, student debt can have severe negative implications. On balance, though, the benefits of a college degree appear to outweigh the costs, writes professor Rafiq Dossani.

  • Effects of Removing Maternity Care and Mental Health Treatment from Coverage Requirements

    May 18, 2017

    The American Health Care Act passed by the U.S. House of Representatives to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act allows states to waive benefits that the ACA deemed “essential.” Dropping maternity care coverage, for example, would reduce premiums by 5 percent but increase out-of-pocket spending for new mothers, writes professor Christine Eibner.

  • Where Are India's Heat Hotspots?

    May 17, 2017

    Poverty, poor sanitation, a precarious water and electricity supply, and limited access to health care make India vulnerable to heat waves. Rural and urban districts could improve their preparedness by developing and targeting local adaptation strategies, writes student Gulrez Azhar (cohort '14).

  • What Street Food Vendors in Uganda Need to Succeed

    May 16, 2017

    Street vendors in Kampala, Uganda, would benefit from infrastructure development, food safety standards, rules of hygiene, and greater focus on healthy products, write student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and professor Deborah Cohen. The city's growing population also would benefit from increased access to nutritious and affordable foods.

  • Mining the Moon for Rocket Fuel to Get Us to Mars

    May 16, 2017

    Students from around the world—including our own Therese Jones (cohort '13)—participated in the 2017 Caltech Space Challenge. They proposed designs of what a lunar launch and supply station for deep space missions might look like, and how it would work.

  • Toward a Renewed Middle East Peace Process

    May 11, 2017

    Momentum is building toward resumption of the dormant Middle East peace process. But alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) says there will need to be a clear, consistent plan that delivers quick, tangible results to both sides and helps restore trust between them in order for a peace plan to succeed.

  • A New Ugandan Cuisine: Showcasing Superfood Qualities of Millet and Sorghum

    May 9, 2017

    The results of a series of cooking contests in Uganda to promote the use of drought-tolerant, nutritious traditional grains—millet and sorghum—signal that a new food trend may be on the horizon. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and professor Deborah Cohen describe their Pardee Initiative "Superfoods" project in this first of three blog posts.

  • Strategic Planning Tools for the Army Senior ROTC Program

    May 5, 2017

    Researchers created a program evaluation tool and a selection evaluation tool to help the Army evaluate existing ROTC programs and explore new market opportunities, keep up with changes in the college student population, and meet both near-term officer production goals as well as longer-term strategic objectives.

  • Impact on the Environment from President Trump's First 100 Days

    May 4, 2017

    President Trump's actions have not yet resulted in demonstrable change in environmental conditions or funding, but the groundwork is being laid for unwinding major regulations and diminishing staff within the EPA and other federal agencies with climate-related research in their portfolios, says professor Debra Knopman.

  • Prototype Tool Designed to Help Law Enforcement Use Data from Mobile Applications

    May 1, 2017

    Student Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) worked with alumni Anne Boustead ('11) and Steven Isley ('10) and professor Ed Balkovich to document a prototype tool called MIKE (the Mobile Information and Knowledge Ecosystem) that can help interested stakeholders — law enforcement, commercial enterprises, regulators, legislators, and the public (including advocacy groups) — better understand the mobile app ecosystem and the relationships among the data, its sources, and applicable legal constraints.

  • U.S.-China Tensions Are Unlikely to Lead to War

    May 1, 2017

    The U.S.-China relationship today may be trending towards greater tension, but the relative stability and overall low level of hostility make the prospect of an accidental escalation to war extremely unlikely, writes professor Timothy Heath.