Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Students Compete in (and Win!) Hackathons

    Dec 6, 2018

    Sometimes described as "invention festivals," hackathons are multi-day events in which people collaborate intensively in an effort to solve a specific problem. Many hackathons involve technology — the word being a portmanteau of "hack" and "marathon" — but teams also include designers, subject-matter experts, and others. With the launch of the Tech and Narrative Lab, Pardee RAND has taken a leap into this area by hosting its own internal events and encouraging student participation in regional competitions.

  • Fall 2018 Alumni Newsletter Highlights Hackathons, New Cohort

    Dec 6, 2018

    Pardee RAND's latest cohort arrived this fall for a two-week bootcamp that included a policy analysis immersion, one of the newest elements of the school's redesign. The Tech & Narrative Lab also broadened student horizons through an opioid hackathon, and Career Services engaged dozens of alumni through a series of new activities.

  • New Career Services Events Increase Alumni Engagement

    Dec 6, 2018

    Many of Pardee RAND's career-focused events would not be possible without alumni participation. Nearly two dozen alumni helped mentor and network with students through exciting new activities this fall.

  • Opening Up the 5.9 GHz Frequency Band for WiFi Use Could Result in Significant Economic Benefits

    Nov 29, 2018

    Few empirically driven estimates explore how WiFi contributes to the economy. Students Diana Gehlhaus Carew, Nicholas Martin, and Jesse Lastunen (all cohort '15) filled this gap by estimating the potential economic value of opening the 5.9 GHz frequency band.

  • Why North Korea Sanctions Relief Is Inappropriate at This Time

    Nov 26, 2018

    In early 2018, Kim Jong Un signaled that he was ready to negotiate with the United States on abandoning North Korea's nuclear weapons. But since then, Pyongyang hasn't taken steps to denuclearize. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) says the DPRK's actions speak louder than its words.

  • Celebrating the Career of Alum Jeffrey Wasserman

    Nov 26, 2018

    RAND Vice President Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85) retired in October after 33 years of service to RAND and 13 years teaching and leading at Pardee RAND Graduate School — but first we threw him a big party.

  • Building a Pipeline of Wargaming Talent: A Two-Track Solution

    Nov 15, 2018

    On issues ranging from potential conflicts with Russia to the future of transportation and logistics, writes student Ellie Bartels (cohort '15) writes, senior Department of Defense leaders have increasingly turned to wargames to imagine the future of war and make long-term investments to confront the challenges ahead.

  • Pardee RAND Well Represented at APPAM DC Conference

    Nov 14, 2018

    Two students presented posters; one student and six alumni presented papers during panel discussions, and 3 professors participated in panels at the annual APPAM Fall Conference. Additionally, two alumni and a professor received "40 for 40 Fellowships" to attend.

  • Evaluation of Los Angeles County's Mental Health Community Engagement Campaign

    Nov 14, 2018

    A community engagement campaign sought to increase awareness of mental health access as a civil rights issue and to increase civic engagement. Student Lauren Davis (cohort '15) and colleagues found that youth who took part showed increased supportive and understanding attitudes toward mental illness, and empowerment and mobilization toward activism around mental health issues.

  • Pardee RAND Receives STEM Designation

    Nov 12, 2018

    Thanks to the school's new designation, international students who receive a Pardee RAND Ph.D. may now be eligible to work in the U.S. for three years before needing an H-1B visa. The Department of Homeland Security allows F-1 visa students who receive STEM degrees to apply for a 24-month extension of their visa.

  • Evaluating Savings Associated with LA County's Mental Health Programs

    Oct 30, 2018

    Los Angeles used its Mental Health Services Act funds to expand access to Full Service Partnership programs. Student Gulrez Azhar (cohort '14) and colleagues estimated that, over a five-year period, program outcomes were associated with $82.9 million cost savings, a 24 percent reduction in government spending.

  • Universities Are Improving Training of Future School Principals

    Oct 30, 2018

    Student Rachel Perera worked with Prof. Susan Gates and RAND colleagues to evaluate the University Principal Preparation Initiative, in which seven universities are beginning to change their principal preparation programs to better reflect the real-world demands of the job.

  • Committed to Improving Health Care Policy: Q&A with Jodi Liu

    Oct 23, 2018

    Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), an associate policy researcher at RAND, studies how to deliver high-quality care and how to pay for it. She discusses her assessment of a single-payer health care proposal in New York State and the supply-and-demand challenges that might arise if an Alzheimer's treatment became available.

  • School Welcomes Visiting Scholars from Coalition of Immokalee Workers

    Oct 19, 2018

    Pardee RAND was excited to welcome two visiting scholars in October, CIW co-founders Greg Asbed, a MacArthur "genius grant" awardee, and Steve Hitov, a long-time social justice lawyer. Their residency included several discussions of labor rights and worker-driven social responsibility.

  • A Threat to Immigrant Health Care with Potential Consequences for All

    Oct 12, 2018

    The proposed changes to the “public charge” rule could jeopardize decades of progress towards improved health care access and health for immigrants and U.S. citizens. Prof. Kathryn Pitkin Derose says negative effects may include worse health outcomes, increased use of emergency rooms, and increased prevalence of communicable diseases.

  • Alum: In Opioid Policy, One Size Does Not Fit All

    Oct 12, 2018

    Congress is addressing the opioid epidemic through new legislation intended to increase access to treatment using medications such as methadone and buprenorphine. Alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) says further investments may be required to make counseling more available, increase Medicaid reimbursement for drug treatment, and reduce the stigma associated with mental health treatment.

  • Mitigating India's Climate-Change Misery

    Oct 11, 2018

    Despite years of dire forecasts, the international community has been unable to halt the steady climb in global temperatures and, as student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort '14) writes, it is the world's poorest who are paying the heaviest toll. As heat-related risks intensify, those living on the margins—in India and elsewhere—will need help to cope effectively.

  • North Korea's Actions Speak Louder Than Its Words

    Oct 11, 2018

    Kim Jong Un has regularly promised to denuclearize, writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75), but he's been all talk. And this year, North Korea has probably built five to nine more nuclear weapons. There are steps that could make a difference if taken before the North Korean nuclear weapon threat grows any further.

  • New Bootcamp Orients Cohort '18, Immerses Them in Policy Analysis

    Oct 5, 2018

    When our newest class of students arrived for orientation, they also experienced the latest element of Pardee RAND’s “reimagined” curriculum: a 10-day bootcamp in which they also learned about the multifaceted and exceedingly thorny policy issue of homelessness.

  • How to Solve the Water Crisis in Gaza

    Sep 26, 2018

    Gaza has long had water and sanitation challenges, but today it's in a state of emergency. Research by alumni Shira Efron (cohort '11) and Jordan Fischbach ('04), student Rouslan Karimov ('15), and Prof. Melinda Moore finds that the crisis could be resolved through infrastructure investment, but political complications and other barriers remain.

  • Fred Pardee’s $3 Million Gift Aims to Strengthen School’s Global Impact

    Sep 17, 2018

    A $3 million pledge from Frederick Pardee will expand the Pardee Initiative for Global Human Progress, integrate its efforts with the school's redesign, and help the school institutionalize a focus on global issues.

  • OJT Project Leads to Decade of Research Collaboration

    Sep 7, 2018

    For more than a decade, alum Kartika Palar (cohort '06) and professor Kathryn Derose have been working together to reduce food insecurity among people with HIV. Student Gabriela Armenta ('15) recently joined them on a novel project in the Dominican Republic.

  • Alumni Evaluate Health Care Payment Reform Pilot

    Aug 31, 2018

    California's Global Payment Program seeks to improve health care for the state's uninsured by providing funds for both traditional and non-traditional services, settings, and providers. Alumni Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Denise Quigley ('91) conducted a mid-point evaluation that found broad improvement.

  • How Can Workers' Compensation Systems Promote Occupational Safety and Health?

    Aug 31, 2018

    Student Nicolas Broten (cohort '15) helped assess the challenges that workers' compensation stakeholder groups have identified, as well as which policy options and research efforts are most important for reforming workers' compensation policy to promote the well-being of workers.

  • A Better Way to Think About Scooters

    Aug 28, 2018

    Unleashed in Santa Monica last September, Bird and its competitors are now in more than 30 American cities—and are being met with new regulations and increased law enforcement. Student Tim McDonald (cohort '16) and Prof. Rob Lempert write that, if officials rely only on 20th-century tools to integrate these 21st-century scooters into their cities, they will miss a big opportunity.