Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • United States Treasury check for stimulus package to ease the impact of Coronavirus (Covid-19)

    School Provides Students Coronavirus Emergency Relief Funding

    Apr 28, 2022

    The Pardee RAND Graduate School has applied for and received more than $500,000 in government support for student and institutional expenses arising from the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Building cranes and power lines connecting high-tension electricity pylons next to a construction site in Kyiv, Ukraine, July 10, 2020, photo by Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters

    Rebuilding Ukraine

    Apr 18, 2022

    As Khrystyna Holynska (cohort '20) and professors William Courtney and Howard Shatz write, by leveraging better investment conditions and reforms and broad international support, Ukraine could carry out a well-executed reconstruction program. It might repair much of the war damage and help Ukraine move into the ranks of faster-growing European economies.

  • Forest floor with clear glass marble engraved with globe map, photo by RomoloTavani/Getty Images

    Amid Climate Change, These Tech and Policy Experts See Reason for Optimism

    Apr 18, 2022

    To slow climate change and adapt to the damage already underway, the world will have to shift how it generates and uses energy, transports people and goods, designs buildings, and grows food. That starts with embracing innovation and change.

  • A man looks at a street monitor showing a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017

    Nuclear-Use Cases for Contemplating Crisis and Conflict on the Korean Peninsula

    Apr 5, 2022

    What are some potential ways that nuclear weapons might be brandished or used in a Korea-originated crisis? An essay by alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) and Prof. Paul Davis sketches a number of cases involving conflict on the Korean peninsula. They offer insights on how and why nuclear war could occur, and the corresponding circumstances that must be avoided.

  • APPAM Conference Includes Many from Pardee RAND

    Mar 29, 2022

    More than two dozen students, alumni, and faculty presented their research at APPAM's (delayed) Fall 2021 conference March 27-29 in Austin, Texas. The conference theme was "The Power of Inclusion: Incorporating Diverse Voices in Public Policy Analysis and Management."

  • U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris waves as she boards Air Force Two prior to departure from Bucharest after a trip to Poland and Romania amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine, March 11, 2022, photo by Saul Loeb/Pool/Reuters

    A Promising Era for Women of Color in U.S. Elections, but Gains in Broader Workplace Leadership Remain Elusive

    Mar 22, 2022

    Women of color remain significantly underrepresented in workplace leadership and along the promotion pipeline in comparison to white women, as well as to black and white men. Zara Fatima Abdurahaman (cohort '21) asks, How much more work needs to be done to achieve the combination of race and gender equity in leadership?

  • Faculty Leaders Program in Policy Research and Analysis

    Mar 18, 2022

    The Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development program for faculty who work with students or in disciplines underrepresented in public policy, is now accepting applications. Offered by the Pardee RAND Graduate School, the program awards fellowships and stipends to 12–16 selected faculty to participate in the policy analysis summer program, which will be held virtually this year.

  • Students, Faculty Share IPCC Findings

    Mar 15, 2022

    Students David Catt (cohort ’16) and Karishma Patel (’17) joined Professors Robert Lempert and Benjamin Preston for a recent webinar to discuss the findings from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group II report, Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability.

  • Two women hugging in a group setting, photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

    Evaluating WhyWeRise 2020 and 2021

    Mar 10, 2022

    WhyWeRise is a social marketing campaign focused on prevention of, and early intervention for, mental health challenges among Los Angeles County residents. Surveys by Ingrid Estrada-Darley (cohort '19) and Profs. Rebecca Collins and Nicole Eberhart suggest that this campaign reached a racially, culturally, and economically diverse group of county residents, fostered a feeling of support among those exposed to the campaign, and boosted residents' awareness of local resources.

  • Older man talking a receptionist at a medical office, photo by stockfour/Getty Images

    Do Financial Incentives Affect Medicare Use by Chronically Ill Individuals?

    Mar 4, 2022

    Alum Sai Ma (cohort '02) and RAND colleagues found that individuals with chronic conditions respond to changes in copays, although these responses are small. Reductions in PCP copays lead to reduced use of some specialists, suggesting that lowering PCP copays could be an effective way to reduce the use of specialist care, a desirable outcome if specialists are overused.

  • Teenage student getting help from her parent during remote school, photo by Imgorthand/Getty Images

    Educating Students with Disabilities: Lessons from the Pandemic

    Mar 3, 2022

    Heather Gomez-Bendaña (cohort '19) and Lucas Greer ('20) analyzed a survey of U.S. educators that sheds light on the obstacles that teachers and principals faced—even before the pandemic. They found that the obstacles make supporting students with disabilities especially challenging in the COVID-19 era.

  • Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky chairs an urgent meeting with leadership of the government, and representatives of the defense and economic sectors, in Kyiv, Ukraine, February 24, 2022, photo by Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via Reuters

    Student, Prof Consider Continuity of Government in Ukraine

    Feb 25, 2022

    To reduce the risks of government collapse, Ukraine's leadership might accelerate preparations to ensure the continuity of government. Some steps are doubtless underway but out of public view, write student Khrystyna Holynska and Prof. William Courtney.

  • Wind turbines surrounded by fog in Costa Rica, photo by OGphoto/Getty Images

    A Green Costa Rican COVID-19 Recovery

    Feb 24, 2022

    Before COVID-19 hit, Costa Rica had been taking a leading role in addressing the effects of climate change by investing in decarbonization. Pardee RAND students, faculty, and alumni consider whether these same investments could also accelerate Costa Rica's pandemic economic recovery and help address historical inequities.

  • Illustrated graph shows how Costa Rica could reach net-zero emissions by 2050 under its National Decarbonization Plan. Achieving net-zero emissions is estimated to create a net economic benefit of $40.9 billion, visualization by Gabrielle Mérite

    Visualizing Costa Rica's Carbon-Neutral Future

    Feb 23, 2022

    The latest product of RAND Art + Data illustrates research findings by Pardee RAND alumni and students David Groves, James Syme, Edmundo Molina-Perez, and Carlos Calvo Hernandez, who analyzed the potential outcomes of Costa Rica's National Decarbonization Plan.

  • Students hold signs inside the Kentucky Capitol Rotunda in opposition to bills Kentucky lawmakers say would eradicate critical race theory from state schools, January 12, 2022, photo by Alton Strupp/USA Today via Reuters

    Anti-Bias Education in U.S. Public Schools

    Feb 22, 2022

    Teaching students explicitly about issues of identity, diversity, equity, and bias can lead to positive outcomes. Ashley Woo (cohort '18), Prof. Julia Kaufman, and RAND colleagues found that nearly three in four K–12 teachers reported that they provide such anti-bias instruction, but more than half said that their school's or district's curriculum materials did not adequately address anti-bias topics.

  • A parent of two students works as a substitute teacher at the Austin Jewish Academy as the spread of the Omicron variant leads to teacher shortages in Austin, Texas, January 20, 2022, photo by Callaghan O'Hare/Reuters

    School Staffing Challenges in the Pandemic's Third Year

    Feb 15, 2022

    As of fall 2021, school staff shortages were most acute for substitutes, bus drivers, special education teachers, and paraprofessionals, Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) finds, based on an analysis of American School District Panel survey data. The turnover of superintendents was normal but half of them said that they might leave in the next few years or were unsure of how long they would stay.

  • Woman talking with her doctor, photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

    Carve-In Models for Specialty Behavioral Health Services: Lessons for California

    Feb 11, 2022

    Many states separate, or "carve out," Medicaid financing of behavioral health services from that for other types of health care, but there has been a recent trend in some states toward "carve-ins": combining financing for behavioral health services with the larger pool of Medicaid-covered services. Jonah Kushner (cohort '20) and Prof. Marcela Horvitz-Lennon examine the experiences of other states with carve-in financing to inform California's consideration of this type of funding.

  • Doctor consulting with patient, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Physician Compensation and Financial Incentives in U.S. Health Systems

    Feb 8, 2022

    Despite growth in value-based payment arrangements and a push to improve value in health care, alumni Cheryl Damberg (cohort '89) and Erin Duffy ('15) find that health systems currently incentivize physicians to maximize volume, thereby maximizing revenues.

  • National Guard Specialist Austin Alt assists a student as he fills in as a substitute teacher due to staffing shortages caused by COVID-19 at Pojoaque Valley Middle School in Pojoaque, New Mexico, January 28, 2022, photo by Adria Malcolm/Reuters

    Challenges That May Be Getting in the Way of Student Learning

    Feb 8, 2022

    Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) and Prof. Heather Schwartz found that, as of November 2021, school district leaders' top three concerns were the mental health of students, teachers, and principals. And 74 percent of them said that political polarization about COVID-19 safety or vaccines was interfering with their ability to educate students.

  • Electrician teaching his apprentices how to strip the wires in the distribution board, photo by simonkr/Getty Images

    The Value of Education and Training After High School

    Feb 2, 2022

    Most types of postsecondary credentials can lead to improved earnings. But alum Lindsey Daugherty (cohort '05) explains that returns can vary across different fields and by demographic characteristics. Understanding the value of credentials can help individuals, employers, and policymakers make smarter investments.