Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Statement from the Dean on Racial Injustice

    The call for social justice that has swept across our nation and the world over this past week demands that we listen, learn, and do more to “shine the light that reveals the dust” and to do the hard work of building a better world not just this week but for years to come. It is my fervent hope that our community will rise to the occasion and live up to our motto, Be the Answer.

  • Coronavirus shown against world map and trend lines, illustration by chakisatelier/Adobe Stock

    Responding to COVID-19 with Research and Analysis

    Members of the Pardee RAND community are actively contributing to the COVID-19 response by sharing their expertise and searching for solutions to coronavirus-related challenges on local, state, national, and global levels.

  • A teacher and student wearing face masks talk to each other using sign language, photo by Wavebreakmedia/Getty Images

    How Are Teachers Educating Students with Disabilities During the Pandemic?

    Apr 8, 2021

    Students Katie Feistel and Heather Gomez-Bendana examined how remote and hybrid learning can present particular challenges to students with disabilities (SWD) and their teachers. Nearly two in five teachers said that their schools offered alternative instructional arrangements for SWD during the pandemic, but this was less common in majority non-White and high-poverty schools.

  • Pardee Commons Enriches Student Life

    Mar 18, 2021

    Even in a Ph.D. program, student life is about more than academics. That's why Pardee RAND is so excited to announce the development of Pardee Commons, a new rent-subsidized student housing community close to campus.

  • People walk down the street at a camp for displaced people while Hurricane Matthew approaches in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 3, 2016, photo by Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

    Climate Change Migration: Developing a Security Strategy for All

    Mar 15, 2021

    Over the past decade, an average of 21.5 million people annually have been forced to move due to the impacts of extreme weather. Jay Balagna (cohort '20) and colleagues argue that building an understanding of the intersection between climate change, migration, and security is crucial and should take into account that many who face the most direct impacts of climate change are already among the most vulnerable.

  • The Hoover Dam on the Colorado River on the border of Arizona and Nevada, photo by stryjek / Adobe Stock

    Water Planning for the Uncertain Future

    Mar 8, 2021

    James Syme (cohort '18) and alumni David Groves ('01) and Edmundo Molina-Perez ('11) conducted seven case studies focusing on the western United States and Mexico to develop an interactive tool that provides information about decisionmaking under deep uncertainty (DMDU) methods—specifically, Robust Decision Making (RDM).

  • WASC Reaffirms Accreditation through 2030

    Mar 8, 2021

    The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Senior College and University Commission reaffirmed Pardee RAND's accreditation for 10 years, approving our programmatic changes and vision for the school moving forward.

  • Dean Announces Leadership Transition

    Mar 1, 2021

    After transforming the Pardee RAND Graduate School and serving for nearly 13 years as the school’s fourth dean, Susan Marquis has announced she will be stepping down at the end of the summer, leaving the school and RAND for her next endeavor.

  • People are seen at a 24-hour COVID-19 vaccination center at the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Brooklyn, New York, January 11, 2021, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    Vaccine Hesitancy Is High Among Black Americans, Including Health Care Workers

    Mar 1, 2021

    Lower vaccination rates among Black Americans would further widen COVID-19 inequities in diagnosis, hospitalization, and mortality. But research by Priya Gandhi (cohort '20) and colleagues finds that concerns about vaccine safety, mistrust of the government's transparency around COVID-19, and beliefs about racism in health care are contributing to mistrust of the vaccine.

  • Figure looks down on another figure from a higher stack of blocks, photo by francescoch/Getty Images

    Shared Prosperity: The Crying Need for Inclusive Globalization

    Feb 23, 2021

    The disaffection of a wide swath of the American population has been linked to the political polarization of the country, as well as its divisive tendencies, writes Prof. Krishna Kumar. While globalization is not the only reason for this disaffection, it is an apt lens through which to view the revolt against elitism, expertise, and changing demographics.

  • The Next Generation Initiative: Faculty Leaders Program in Policy Research and Analysis

    Feb 22, 2021

    The Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development program for faculty who work with students or in disciplines underrepresented in public policy, is now accepting applications. Part of the Pardee RAND Graduate School's Next Generation Initiative, the program awards fellowships and stipends to 12–16 selected faculty to participate in the policy analysis summer program, which will be held virtually this year.

  • A Kindergarten teacher cleans and prepares her classroom, from where she will begin the new school year teaching virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic, in Boston, Massachusetts, September 18, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Stress Topped the Reasons Why Public School Teachers Quit, Even Before COVID-19

    Feb 22, 2021

    When asked why they left the profession, former teachers cited stress twice as often as insufficient pay, according to research by student Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19). Most former teachers took jobs with less or equal pay, and 3 in 10 without health insurance or retirement benefits.

  • The emergency room entrance at Essentia Health, a 133-bed hospital in Fargo, North Dakota, October 25, 2020, photo by Bing Guan/Reuters

    Setting U.S. Hospital Prices Could Cut Overall Health Spending by Billions

    Feb 18, 2021

    Price regulations face political obstacles and have been strongly opposed by medical providers. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Nabeel Qureshi ('18) find that setting prices for all commercial health care payers could reduce hospital spending by $61.9 billion to $236.6 billion a year if the rates were set at 100 to 150 percent of the amounts paid by Medicare.

  • Doctor talking to a woman with a young girl in her lap, photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

    Primary Care Productivity

    Feb 17, 2021

    To advance understanding of primary care clinic productivity, Annie Brothers (cohort '18) and her coauthors reviewed relevant literature and convened a diverse set of stakeholders to explore definitions of productivity, input, and output in primary care; identify relevant tools; and establish consensus on key aspects of primary care productivity.

  • Female mechanic standing under a car in a garage

    “Build Back Better” Requires Going Beyond Hard Infrastructure

    Feb 16, 2021

    The COVID-19 crisis appears to reveal a number of vulnerabilities in the vital “soft” components of America’s infrastructure such as adaptive planning, skills training and access equality, writes student Keren Zhu (cohort '17) in the American Society for Public Administration's PATimes.

  • Intricate real life-like models in a wargame at Marine Corps Base Quantico in Quantico, Virginia, August 23, 2017, photo by Frances Seybold/U.S. Marine Corps

    Wargames as an Educational Tool

    Feb 8, 2021

    The benefits of games for military education are well documented, writes alum Ellie Bartels (cohort '15). But harnessing the potential of games to foster innovation may require a commitment to sustain gaming over the years needed to explore a problem space and develop and stress-test new ideas.

  • Business owner in a mask posting a closed sign on the door, photo by RichLegg/Getty Images

    Comparing National and International Approaches to COVID-19 Measures

    Jan 29, 2021

    To track how well different countries and U.S. states are responding to the pandemic—and to make valid cross-country and cross-state comparisons of key outcomes—uniform measures are needed. Hamad Al-Ibrahim (cohort '18), Joan Chang ('18), and RAND colleagues evaluated the comparability of commonly used COVID-19-related measures and make recommendations for the use and development of measures that would allow for more standardized and valid comparisons.

  • Bottles of drugs on the shelf at the Rock Canyon Pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, May 9, 2019, photo by George Frey/Reuters

    U.S. Prescription Drug Prices Are 2.56 Times Those in Other Countries

    Jan 28, 2021

    Prices for prescription drugs in the United States in 2018 were 256 percent of those in 32 comparison countries, according to research by Alejandro Becerra-Ornelas (cohort '17) and Mahlet Tebeka ('17). For brand-name drugs, U.S. prices were 344 percent higher. But for generic drugs, they were only 84 percent of the average paid in other nations.

  • Tongass National Forest, Alaska, <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tongass_National_Forest_17.jpg">photo</a> by <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Gillfoto">gillfoto</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>

    Local Communities Need a Voice in How to 'Build Back Better'

    Jan 12, 2021

    Long before it was popularized and made its way into political slogans and economic recovery battle cries, the phrase “building back better” was a central tenet of disaster recovery and community resilience. Max Izenberg (cohort '18) asks, how should community voices be incorporated into “building back better” processes?

  • A woman stands on a ruined building after Hurricane Eta, in Wawa Bar, a Miskito indigenous community in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, November 23, 2020, photo by Katlyn Holland/CRS /Latin America News Agency/Reuters

    Previous Disasters Provide Important Lessons for Central America's Recovery from Hurricanes

    Jan 11, 2021

    As the global community works together to assist Central America in recovering from the disastrous 2020 hurricane season, alum David Groves (cohort '01) and colleagues write, experiences from other recent disaster recovery efforts offer some helpful lessons both for the governments of the region as well as outsiders providing resources and support.

  • U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptors from 94th Fighter Squadron landed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Aug. 10, 2017, photo by Staff Sgt. Carlin O. Leslie/U.S. Air Force

    Bad Idea: Overly Focusing on Development and Acquisition Speed

    Dec 16, 2020

    The Pentagon has in recent years turned its attention to the need for speed in weapons system development and acquisition. Alum Jon Wong (cohort '12) writes that, while shortening the timeline for program development and fielding is important for Defense Department acquisition leaders, overly prioritizing speed can lead to issues with program management, sustainment, and other areas.

  • A student using her laptop at home, photo by damircudic/Getty Images

    Despite Its Challenges, Remote Learning Is Here to Stay

    Dec 15, 2020

    School district leaders are concerned about students' unequal opportunities to learn during the pandemic, students' social and emotional learning needs, and insufficient funding to cover staff, according to Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) and her coauthors. Still, about two in ten leaders still anticipate that a fully remote learning option will become a permanent public school offering.