Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Repealing or Replacing ACA Would Result in More Uninsured Veterans and Stress on VA Health System

    Sep 14, 2017

    Recent congressional proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of uninsured nonelderly veterans and further increase demand for VA health care. The effects would vary across states, according to research by student Mimi Shen (cohort '16), but the largest impacts would be felt in states that expanded Medicaid.

  • Joint Military Exercises Distract from Complex Russia-Belarus Relationship

    Sep 13, 2017

    Analysts and military leaders have concerns that Russia will use the Zapad 2017 exercise in Belarus as a smokescreen to put personnel and equipment in place, and keep it there. But student Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) argues that the deep ties and history of cooperation between the two states make the chances of that happening unlikely.

  • Pardee RAND Rolls Out Policy Design Studios

    Sep 6, 2017

    A “studio,” normally thought of as a space where visual or performance artists work, is also a place for integrating knowledge, tools, and skills within an atmosphere of experimentation. Because policies must be imagined, designed, and understood within the context of social systems, Pardee RAND is integrating studios into the core curriculum this fall.

  • Dardia to Represent Alumni on Board of Governors

    Sep 5, 2017

    Michael Dardia (cohort '89) will join the Pardee RAND Board of Governors in November as the new alumni representative. He recently participated in a Q&A session with the School's new development officer.

  • Campaign for Fair Food Makes a Real Difference

    Aug 25, 2017

    The Fair Food Program protects farmworkers while providing corporations with transparency in their supply chains and tremendous brand protection, writes Dean Susan Marquis. It has been widely recognized for improving agricultural working conditions and for changing the culture of America's farm fields.

  • What Emerging Research Says About the Promise of Personalized Learning

    Aug 16, 2017

    Personalized learning holds promise as an innovation that can lead to improved educational outcomes for students. But Prof. John Pane writes that implementers should have modest expectations for the magnitude of the benefits, and patience for the full benefits to emerge.

  • Another Casualty of Climate Change: Peace

    Aug 15, 2017

    Student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort ' 14) says the connection between human conflict and climate change is no mere coincidence. Drought, temperature and tensions rise in tandem, with the implicit threat of violent conflict not far behind.

  • Pardee RAND Welcomes Executive Vice Dean

    Aug 15, 2017

    Daniel Grunfeld joined Pardee RAND on August 14 as Executive Vice Dean for Strategy and Partnerships. In this new position, he will work closely with Dean Susan Marquis and others to help direct the school’s strategic direction, including developing a new network of institutional partners and philanthropic support to advance the school’s reimagined design and vision for the future.

  • School Hosts Fifth Annual Faculty Leaders Program

    Aug 10, 2017

    Pardee RAND held its fifth annual Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development workshop to encourage diversity in the next generation of policy analysts and leaders, July 24–28. The School welcomed 14 faculty members from colleges and universities that serve students who are traditionally underrepresented in public policy.

  • Extending Marketplace Tax Credits Would Make Coverage More Affordable for Middle-Income Adults

    Jul 27, 2017

    Paying for health care coverage is a challenge for Americans facing rising premiums, deductibles, and copayments. Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and professor Christine Eibner say the ACA's tax credits that make marketplace insurance more affordable for lower-income individuals should be extended to middle-income adults aged 50–64.

  • Lessons from Israel's Wars in Gaza

    Jul 26, 2017

    The Israel Defense Force had to evolve to meet an adaptive and determined hybrid adversary during its wars in Gaza. Student Elizabeth Bartels (cohort '15) and alum/prof Shira Efron (cohort '11) found that the U.S. Army and the joint force can learn from the IDF's challenge of balancing intense international legal public scrutiny and the hard operational realities of urban warfare.

  • Norris Discusses Increasing Diversity in the 21st Century: The Role of Mentoring

    Jul 25, 2017

    Dr. Keith Norris, an internationally recognized clinician scientist and health policy leader at the UCLA Geffen School of Medicine, discussed the role of mentoring to increase diversity in the field of biomedical and health research. He was the keynote speaker at the fifth annual Pardee RAND Faculty Leaders Program.

  • Getting (Solar) Electricity Pricing Right

    Jul 24, 2017

    For many U.S. homeowners, an investment in rooftop solar is becoming a cost-competitive alternative to purchasing grid electricity. But student Benjamin Smith (cohort '15) and professors Nick Burger and Aimee Curtright note that, as demand soars, states are struggling to adapt a 20th-century electrical grid to 21st-century supply and demand, leading to confusion and cost uncertainty.

  • Should California Drop Criminal Penalties for Drug Possession?

    Jul 20, 2017

    Californians have a lot to consider when it comes to decriminalizing possession. But professor Beau Kilmer sayd now is the time for a rigorous discussion about removing criminal penalties for drug possession, rather than rushing to judgment in the heat of a future election season.

  • Pittsburgh's Options to Address Lead in Its Water

    Jul 18, 2017

    Pittsburgh is struggling to improve its aging water system. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and alum/professor Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) review the history and recent developments related to the use of lead pipes and the policy options for lead remediation currently being weighed by local decisionmakers.

  • A Colombian Survivor's Crusade to Strengthen Punishment for Acid Attacks

    Jul 17, 2017

    Acid attacks—one of the most extreme forms of violence against women and girls—have devastating, lifelong consequences for survivors. Student Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) writes that governments can, like Colombia, impose tougher punishments on attackers and support programs to build survivors' self-confidence.

  • Navigating the Uncertain Path to Decarbonization

    Jul 11, 2017

    Deep decarbonization can reduce the risk of climate change, and it offers opportunities to reimagine energy, transportation, and infrastructure. But Prof. Robert Lempert says it could also fail in many ways. Diverse, independent actors need a shared understanding of its complexity and deep uncertainty to design a solution to this challenge.

  • Ingredients for Health Care Reform

    Jul 10, 2017

    Despite their differences, the Affordable Care Act and the current proposals to replace it take a similar approach to providing health insurance. Prof. Christine Eibner asks, What might some alternatives look like? And how could they provide coverage to more Americans?

  • Lessons for First Responders on the Front Lines of Terrorism

    Jul 10, 2017

    Given the persistent risk of terrorist attacks, it is critical to learn from past incidents to prepare for future ones, writes prof. Chris Nelson. Medical and nonmedical first responders need more training in basic lifesaving skills. Open communication lines such as a dedicated radio frequency could help responders better coordinate. Disaster drills are also essential.

  • Getting the Lead Out of Pittsburgh's Water

    Jul 3, 2017

    Without an aggressive long-term strategy for replacing service lines, and collaboration among the water authority, public officials, and residents, lead in Pittsburgh's water will persist, writes professor (and alum) Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04).

  • How to Bolster Recruitment of Women in the Military

    Jun 28, 2017

    As ground combat jobs are transitioning to include women, efforts to improve the recruitment process are expanding. Having more female recruiters would help, as would outreach materials that counter stereotypes and highlight the roles women fill in the military, according to research by student Christina Steiner (cohort '09) and professors Doug Yeung, Chaitra Hardison, and Lawrence Hanser.

  • The Effects of Travel and Tourism on California's Economy

    Jun 27, 2017

    California's travel and tourism industry employs a diverse workforce that makes a meaningful contribution to the state's economy. Student Olena Bogdan (cohort '12) and professor Ed Keating find that, for some, the industry offers a stable career path with good wages and wage growth. For others, it's a launching point into other industries.

  • Spring 2017 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Jun 21, 2017

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about the six new Pardee RAND analytic Methods Centers, Dean Susan Marquis' visit to China (with alum Hui Wang, cohort '88), student presenters and moderators at the regional APPAM conference, and more.

  • 'Principal Pipelines' Can Be an Affordable Way to Improve Schools

    Jun 20, 2017

    Improving school leadership by better selecting, training, and evaluating principals can be an affordable way to reduce turnover and improve schools, according to research by Melody Harvey (cohort '12) and professor Susan Gates.

  • A 'Learning System' in Behavioral Health Can Help in Sharing Best Practices, Innovations

    May 30, 2017

    Leveraging technological advances to make better use of the best available data could help rein in healthcare costs and improve both quality and safety, writes alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). This makes sense whether the health care being delivered is physical or behavioral.