Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Child and adult hands holding a plant in an egg shell

    Early Childhood Programs Can Improve Outcomes and Outweigh Costs

    Nov 16, 2017

    Students Ashley Muchow (cohort '13) and Maya Buenaventura (cohort '14) worked with professors Jill Cannon, Lynne Karoly, and Rebecca Kilburn to review 115 early childhood interventions — including preschool, home visiting, parent education, and other approaches. They found that most programs have favorable effects on at least one child outcome, and most of the programs with benefit–cost analyses show positive returns.

  • Elderly man with chin on his fist, looking out a sunny window

    U.S. Health System Should Prepare for Future Alzheimer's Treatments

    Nov 15, 2017

    Advanced clinical trials are underway for at least 10 promising therapies for Alzheimer's disease. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) found that the U.S. health care system lacks the capacity to rapidly move a treatment from approval into wide clinical use. Millions of people could miss out on transformative care if such a breakthrough occurs.

  • Twenty Pardee RANDites Present at APPAM in Chicago

    Nov 10, 2017

    Alumni, students and faculty converged on Chicago for APPAM's 39th annual fall research conference November 2–4. The theme of the conference was Measurement Matters: Better Data for Better Decisions.

  • Nest egg with state of California flag painted on the egg

    The Looming Pension Crisis

    Nov 8, 2017

    California leads the nation in pension underfunding. The state government has $464.4 billion in unfunded liabilities — the difference between resources that will be available in the state's pension fund and what will be owed to retiring employees. Executive Vice Dean Dan Grunfeld explains that, as dire as the problem is now, it could double over the next 12 years.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un provides guidance with Ri Hong Sop (2nd L) and Hong Sung Mu (2nd R) on a nuclear weapons program in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang, North Korea

    Recovering from a Nuclear Attack on a U.S. City

    Nov 7, 2017

    Responding after a nuclear attack will require having planned and prepared for problems that are very different than those encountered after hurricanes and earthquakes, writes Prof. David Shlapak. U.S. cities are inadequately prepared to handle a disaster of this magnitude.

  • How Safe Should Autonomous Vehicles Be Before They're Introduced to Market?

    Nov 7, 2017

    Prof Nidhi Kalra and alum David G. Groves (cohort '01) developed a model to compare 500 different scenarios of autonomous vehicle introduction, adoption, and improvement. The research shows that putting autonomous vehicles on the road sooner, allowing them to improve quicker, could save hundreds of thousands of lives over time.

  • Sling load inspector checks the load plan paperwork prior to sling load operations with the 44th Expeditionary Signal Battalion March 22, 2016 at the Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany

    The Long-Term Budget Shortfall and National Security: A Problem the U.S. Should Stop Avoiding

    Nov 6, 2017

    Bold promises and even actions that balance the budget for the short term should not mask the fact that the U.S. government has failed to face its long-term budget problems. Without changes, writes. Prof Howard Shatz, the ability to pay for many functions — including defense — will rely wholly on borrowed money.

  • Police investigate a pickup truck used in an attack on the West Side Highway in lower Manhattan in New York City, November 1, 2017

    New York Terror Attack: Can Vehicle Attacks Be Prevented?

    Nov 1, 2017

    The recent vehicle attack in Manhattan was the deadliest terror attack on New York since 9/11. Preventing every attack is unrealistic, writes Prof. Colin Clarke, but with increased vigilance, cooperation with law enforcement, and intelligence sharing, citizens can help mitigate the threat of terrorism.

  • Halloween display of candy

    Candy Out of Sight, Out of Mind

    Oct 31, 2017

    CVS is cutting back on candy at the cash register, making junk food less visible and “healthier” snacks easier to find. Any move that nudges consumers toward healthier choices should be applauded, writes Prof. Deborah Cohen, but CVS could take the lead as a retailer and do away with junk food displays by the cash register altogether.

  • A person's hand writing a checklist

    Checklist of Best Practices Developed to Guide Development of Suicide Prevention Campaigns

    Oct 25, 2017

    Is your crisis line’s suicide-prevention communications effort working well enough? What should you be doing differently? Some help is available through a checklist published earlier this year, writes Prof. Joie Acosta.

  • Members of al Qaeda's Nusra Front move toward their positions near al-Zahra village, north of Aleppo city, November 25, 2014

    The Moderate Face of Al Qaeda

    Oct 24, 2017

    Al Qaeda in Syria cut ties with its parent organization to portray itself as a legitimate, capable, and independent force in the Syrian civil war. The group appears dedicated to helping Syrians prevail, writes Prof. Colin Clarke, and now that ISIS has lost its capital in Raqqa, al Qaeda may be the only group viewed as militarily capable of challenging the Assad regime.

  • An engineer working on an oil field

    Employers and Colleges Could Plan Better for Future Oil and Natural Gas Workforce

    Oct 17, 2017

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to tap natural gas should bring long-term economic benefits to Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15) helped survey employers and educators to inform policy decisions on how best to expand and sustain the pool of workers with the needed knowledge and skills.

  • Close up of the state of Iowa on an antique-looking map

    Evaluating Iowa's Proposed Stopgap Measure

    Oct 16, 2017

    To stabilize the state's individual health insurance market, Iowa proposed the Iowa Stopgap Measure (ISM). Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and colleagues say ISM modifications would increase the federal deficit, but decrease federal spending per enrollee.

  • A container is loaded on to the first Chinese container ship to depart after the inauguration of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor port in Gwadar, Pakistan November 13, 2016

    China's Field of Dreams in Pakistan

    Oct 16, 2017

    China is four years into joint planning and construction of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, from Kashgar, China to the Pakistani port of Gwadar. Prof. Rafiq Dossani asks, What are the benefits for China and Pakistan and what do they mean for future growth in the region?

  • Wargaming at the Naval Postgraduate School

    Adding Shots on Target: Wargaming Beyond the Game

    Oct 9, 2017

    Figuring out what the future may look like—and what concepts and technology we should invest in now to prepare—is hard. Student Ellie Bartels (cohort '15) considers how the wargaming community can build a cycle of research to help understand what these paths might be.

  • A newborn baby rests beside his mother at the Ana Betancourt de Mora Hospital in Camaguey, Cuba, June 19, 2015, the week the World Health Organization declared Cuba the first country in the world to eliminate the transmission of HIV and syphilis from mother to child

    Doing More with Less: Lessons from Cuba's Health Care System

    Oct 6, 2017

    High U.S. health care costs do not yield corresponding health outcomes for its citizens. But students Claire O'Hanlon (cohort '13) and Melody Harvey ('12) note that Cuba, for less than a tenth of U.S. costs, has attained comparable outcomes on many indicators, such as life expectancy and infant mortality. Cuba prioritizes primary care and prevention and addresses social determinants of health.

  • Scales of justice in front of computer monitors with code

    The Intersection of Algorithms and an Individual's Rights

    Sep 29, 2017

    Data collection, and our reliance on it, have evolved extremely rapidly. The resulting algorithms have proved invaluable for organizing, evaluating and utilizing information. Our new executive vice dean, Dan Grunfeld, poses the question: How do individuals' rights come in to play, when data about their lives is compiled to create algorithms, and the resulting tools are applied to judge them?

  • Santa Monica's Wellbeing Project

    Sep 29, 2017

    Prof Anita Chandra and Santa Monica city officials discuss the Wellbeing Project, which aimed to evaluate overall community wellbeing and incorporate these results into city planning and governance.

  • Medical staff member checking a blood bag

    Public Cord Blood Banks Provide Benefits Despite Drop in Use

    Sep 29, 2017

    U.S. umbilical cord blood banks are a valuable resource for patients and the research community. Research by student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) indicates their benefits far outweigh their costs and they should continue to receive federal support. Stakeholders could work together to strengthen the industry and improve the genetic diversity and quality of the national inventory.

  • Women test water samples for a water pollution or conservation project outdoors

    Community Citizen Science Could Transform Science and Society

    Sep 27, 2017

    Community citizen science involves public participation in research to support interventional activities or policy change. Students Amanda F. Edelman and Therese Jones (both cohort '13) find that there is disagreement over current standards of practice, but if successful, citizen science could improve communities, science, and decisionmaking.

  • Senator Bernie Sanders speaks during an event to introduce the Medicare for All Act of 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., September 13, 2017

    Savings from a Single-Payer Health System Would Not Be Automatic

    Sep 26, 2017

    Polls have shown increasing public support for a single-payer system in the U.S., writes alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12). Yet there is no agreement on how to set up and pay for a single-payer system or even how much it would cost.

  • Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), accompanied by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO), Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, speaks with reporters following the party luncheons on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 19, 2017.

    Do Americans Expect Too Much from Health Insurance?

    Sep 23, 2017

    Americans expect affordable coverage for pre-existing conditions, access to routine services, and for the health care system to protect them from financial risk from accidents or illness. As a product designed primarily for risk protection, insurance may not be the most efficient or affordable approach to achieving these objectives, write professors Christine Eibner and Katherine Grace Carman.

  • Medical doctor evaluates veteran during appointment

    Repealing or Replacing ACA Would Result in More Uninsured Veterans and Stress on VA Health System

    Sep 14, 2017

    Recent congressional proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of uninsured nonelderly veterans and further increase demand for VA health care. The effects would vary across states, according to research by student Mimi Shen (cohort '16), but the largest impacts would be felt in states that expanded Medicaid.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin and Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko walk to watch the closing stage of the joint war games Zapad-2013 (West-2013) at the Gozhsky firing range in Grodno, September 26, 2013

    Joint Military Exercises Distract from Complex Russia-Belarus Relationship

    Sep 13, 2017

    Analysts and military leaders have concerns that Russia will use the Zapad 2017 exercise in Belarus as a smokescreen to put personnel and equipment in place, and keep it there. But student Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) argues that the deep ties and history of cooperation between the two states make the chances of that happening unlikely.

  • A business man looking at gears and a drawing of work and innovation

    The State of the American Worker

    Sep 12, 2017

    In this Events @ RAND podcast, a panel of RAND's top analysts, including Pardee RAND professors James Hosek, Krishna Kumar, and Kathleen Mullen, discuss emerging trends in the labor market and policy options to address inequality and jobs of the future.