Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • How to Counter Putin's Subversive War on the West

    Aug 1, 2016

    Russian cybercrime, Olympics doping, and other active measures have one thing in common: Moscow admits no wrongdoing. These scandals exacerbate the frigid relations between Moscow and the West. Diplomacy sometimes works slowly, but it helps, writes prof. Martin Libicki.

  • The High Cost of Free College

    Aug 1, 2016

    Subsidies may make institutions inclined to raise tuition since the government would foot the bill. One way to address this issue, writes prof. Trey Miller, is to develop and implement policies that encourage greater productivity from higher education institutions.

  • Faculty Leaders Program Trains Twelve More Policy Research Mentors

    Jul 29, 2016

    In the last four years, nearly 50 faculty members from 26 institutions across the United States have participated in the Pardee RAND Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development opportunity aimed at faculty serving highly diverse student bodies.

  • How Effective Are Military Academy Admission Standards?

    Jul 22, 2016

    Rigorous analyses by Susan Burkhauser and Mustafa Oguz (both cohort '09) of the selection processes for the U.S. Air Force Academy and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point show that the academies' processes predict students' future success as officers.

  • Afghan Government Support for Local Police Program Is Shaky

    Jul 21, 2016

    Established by U.S. and NATO special operations forces, the Afghan Local Police program was designed to become part of the Afghan Ministry of Interior Affairs (MOI). Research by Brian Gordon (cohort '12) indicates the MOI has made progress in logistics, personnel management, and training activities, but faces serious gaps in its ability to sustain the program.

  • Quality of Care in VA Health System Compares Well to Other Health Settings

    Jul 18, 2016

    The Veterans Affairs health care system generally performs better than or similar to other health care systems on providing safe and effective care to patients, with some exceptions, according to research by student Claire E. O'Hanlon (cohort '13), alum Christina Y. Huang (cohort '10), and professors Peter S. Hussey and Courtney A. Gidengil.

  • Fatal Crash Shouldn't Kill Self-Driving Cars

    Jul 16, 2016

    The first known fatality in an autonomous vehicle occurred on May 7 and raises important questions. It does not, however, mean that self-driving cars are less safe than human drivers or that development of the technology should be stopped, writes Prof. Nidhi Kalra.

  • U.S. Department of Defense Experiences with Substituting Government Employees for Military Personnel

    Jul 14, 2016

    There is considerable opportunity to identify positions suitable for military-to-civilian conversion, but there are numerous impediments to authorizing and executing military-to-civilian conversions, according to research by (then-students) Julia Pollak and Brian Gordon (both cohort '12), and professors Jennifer Lewis and Ed Keating.

  • Improving Decision Support for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

    Jul 12, 2016

    Students David Manheim (cohort '12) and Meg Chamberlin (cohort '14), along with professors Melinda Moore and Raffaele Vardavas, offer nine best practices for using modeling and decision-support tools to inform public health policymaking.

  • Current and Future Exposure of Infrastructure in the United States to Natural Hazards

    Jul 12, 2016

    Infrastructure in some areas of the country currently faces disproportionate exposure to natural hazards, and this exposure is likely to increase in the future as a result of climate change, according to research by professor Henry Willis, alumni Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) and Edmundo Molina-Perez (cohort '11), and students Lauren Kendrick and Katie Loa (both cohort '12).

  • Commencement Issue of Findings Features New Alumni

    Jul 7, 2016

    Eight students joined the ranks of Pardee RAND alumni since the last issue of Findings went to press; they and 37 others (a total of 45 Ph.D. grads and 46 additional M.Phil. recipients) are celebrated in this Commencement issue of our quarterly alumni newsletter.

  • Should Some Californians Lose Their 'License to Drink'?

    Jul 6, 2016

    In California, many efforts to reduce repeat drunken driving focus on the driving. Prof. Beau Kilmer asks, What if the state targeted the “drunk” aspect instead?

  • Revisiting Restrictions on Blood Donations from Gay and Bisexual Men

    Jul 5, 2016

    The FDA does not accept blood from male donors who have had sex with a man in the previous 12 months. This has led to an ongoing debate about whether this restriction is supported by scientific evidence or, as some have argued, related to lingering stigma and discrimination related to HIV/AIDS, writes Prof. Sarah MacCarthy.

  • Grasping the Brexit Moment for Free Trade

    Jul 1, 2016

    The United Kingdom's surprising vote to exit the EU turned another tricky day into a possible social crisis. But where there is crisis, there is also opportunity, and the vote presents an opening for another step forward of global trade and investment liberalization, writes Prof. Howard Shatz.

  • How Do Consumers Make Choices in ACA Marketplaces?

    Jun 28, 2016

    Ashley N. Muchow (cohort '13) contributed to a literature review on health insurance choice to understand how consumers make decisions and the extent to which confusion, lack of information, and other factors can hinder decisionmaking.

  • Capabilities and Future Needs for Expanding Flight Research at NASA

    Jun 27, 2016

    Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) worked with the RAND research team assessing available flight research capabilities and future needs at NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate.

  • Young Workers Without College Degrees Face Uncomfortable Truths

    Jun 23, 2016

    Young Americans without a college education suffer from high unemployment, low earnings, and delayed adulthood with a limited ability to buy a home. To help them, policymakers need to remind themselves that workforce training and labor policy must focus on the technology-driven jobs of tomorrow, writes student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15).

  • Don't Learn the Wrong Lessons from Rapid Acquisition

    Jun 23, 2016

    Rapid acquisition practices that worked during recent wars may not easily translate to peacetime endeavors. Enthusiasm for rapid acquisition must be tempered by an understanding of the circumstances that made it work and the downsides that were accepted in wartime, writes alum Jon Wong (cohort '12).

  • Rep. John Lewis Speaks at Biennial Commencement Weekend

    Jun 20, 2016

    Civil rights leader U.S. Rep. John Lewis gave the keynote address at the Pardee RAND Graduate School Commencement on Saturday, June 18. Also honored were Warren Olney, Carolyn Meyers, Joseph Newhouse, and Arthur Brooks.

  • Rep. John Lewis Speaks at Biennial Commencement Weekend

    Jun 20, 2016

    Civil rights leader U.S. Rep. John Lewis gave the keynote address at the Pardee RAND Graduate School Commencement on Saturday, June 18. Also honored were Warren Olney, Carolyn Meyers, Joseph Newhouse, and Arthur Brooks.

  • Brooks Receives Third Biennial Leadership Award

    Jun 20, 2016

    Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) received the Pardee RAND Alumni Leadership Award during the 2016 Commencement Weekend in June.

  • Countering Extremism: Early Childhood Education Forgotten

    Jun 8, 2016

    Global attention has turned to education as a way to counter extremism, but what has been missing from these conversations is a focus on learning in children's first years, when much brain development occurs, writes Prof. Rita Karam. In the Middle East and North Africa, government underinvestment in formal programs for young children is the norm.

  • China's Yuan as a Reserve Currency: Boon or Bane for the Dollar?

    Jun 3, 2016

    Establishing a system in which two reserve currencies compete with each other to affect global decisions about reserve holdings may lead to greater financial stability than the present dollar-dominated system, writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • ISIS and Dirty Bombs

    Jun 3, 2016

    There has been growing concern that terrorists might use radiological sources to create a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). Prof. Gregory Jones explains that calculations have shown that an attack would be unlikely to produce radioactive contamination sufficient to kill or even injure anyone, but there would be psychological and economic effects.

  • Technological Lessons from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Accident

    Jun 1, 2016

    To improve responses to future radiological or nuclear contingencies, alum Sarah Evans (cohort '12) and professors Cynthia Dion-Schwartz, Scott Harold, and Lloyd Thrall draw lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant. They analyze how technologies were used successfully to counter radioactive contamination and identify capability gaps that could be redressed through novel technologies or improved use of existing technologies.