Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • How to Be Safer in the Arctic

    Oct 3, 2016

    The Arctic is more accessible than it once was, but it's still a formidable place to travel. An emergency involving a cruise ship or a downed plane could stress the search-and-rescue system. But modest investments and planning measures can make a big difference, write alum Timothy Smith (cohort '13) and prof. Abbie Tingstad.

  • Workers' Compensation Reforms Helped Replace Wages and Offset Earnings Losses After the Great Recession

    Sep 27, 2016

    California workers' compensation law is likely succeeding in providing additional benefits for permanently disabled workers, and has helped to offset the impact of the Great Recession, according to research by alum Ujwal Kharel (cohort '11).

  • Estimating the Impacts of the Trump and Clinton Health Plans

    Sep 23, 2016

    An analysis by Prof. Christine Eibner of the proposed health care plans of the two major parties' presidential candidates estimated the likely effects of each policy relative to the ACA in 2018 on the number of people covered, consumer out-of-pocket spending, and the federal deficit.

  • Physicians with Waivers to Prescribe Buprenorphine for Opioid Addiction Have Capacity to Treat More Patients

    Sep 20, 2016

    Many American physicians who prescribe buprenorphine to treat individuals addicted to opioids are prescribing substantially below the patient limits allowed by law, according to research by alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). More than 20 percent of waivered physicians treated only three or fewer patients.

  • How to Prevent Drones Colliding in Crowded Skies

    Sep 14, 2016

    The federal government should work with private firms to develop drone traffic management systems and test drone designs, write professors Kenneth Kuhn, William Welser, and Jia Xu. This could help stimulate the development of drone aviation. It could also help modernize the air traffic control system.

  • Central Bank Perversity: The Downside to Aggressive Monetary Policy

    Sep 13, 2016

    Aggressive monetary policy has negative effects on retirees, on income inequality, and on market stability—both domestically and globally—writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • Your Questions About Marijuana Legalization, Answered

    Sep 13, 2016

    At least five states will vote on legal recreational marijuana this November. Drug policy expert and Pardee RAND professor Beau Kilmer hosted an “Ask Me Anything” session on Reddit to shed light on this and other issues.

  • The Precarious State of Syrian Refugee Women, Children in Lebanon

    Sep 13, 2016

    While the gendered impact of political conflict on women and children has been well-documented in other conflicts, much less is known about the effect the Syrian civil war is having on women and children displaced by the conflict, writes Mahlet Atakilt Woldetsadik (cohort '13).

  • Which Countries Could Become Disease Hot Spots?

    Sep 12, 2016

    Identifying and focusing on vulnerable countries that could become hot spots for infectious disease could help in the fight against future outbreaks. Students Bill Gelfeld (cohort '14) and Yemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) teamed up with professors Melinda Moore and Chris Paul to do just that.

  • Summer 2016 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Sep 8, 2016

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about our successful Be the Answer campaign, new courses for the new school year, CoCom efforts to support students, our latest Brown Faculty Fellow, and more.

  • Little Research Exists on UK Service Leavers’ Transition to Civilian Life

    Sep 8, 2016

    The Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) supports families of UK Service leavers as they transition to civilian life. Research by Brent Anderson (cohort '14) and Prof. Agnes Schafer found that to help the FiMT, more research is needed in the areas of family engagement, family breakdown, housing and spousal employment.

  • Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching: Interim Report on Student Outcomes

    Sep 7, 2016

    Through 2013-2014, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching initiative had a limited impact. But the recent upward trajectory in student outcomes suggests that reforms implemented as part of the study might be on the way to having a positive effect, according to research by Gabriel Weinberger (cohort '13) and professor Italo Gutierrez.

  • Zanini Quantifies Cost of Excess Management

    Sep 6, 2016

    According to research by alum Michele Zanini (cohort '96) published in the Harvard Business Review, "bureaucracy creates a significant drag on productivity and organizational resilience and innovation" and costs the United States $3 trillion per year.

  • How 'Star Trek' Inspired a Boy to Become a Scientist

    Aug 26, 2016

    Prof. William Marcellino discusses how “Star Trek” convinced him at an early age that science and the advancement of human knowledge could make the world a better place.

  • Using High-Performance Computing to Support Water Resource Planning

    Aug 25, 2016

    Alum David Groves (cohort '01) and Prof. Rob Lempert, along with researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, tested five different water management portfolios such as conservation, groundwater and seawater desalination, and water reuse, against thousands of scenarios reflecting uncertainty about future climate change and development patterns.

  • Engineering a Roadmap for Health Information Technology in Chile

    Aug 25, 2016

    Emilio Chavez-Herrerias (cohort '14) and Fernando Hoces de la Guardia (cohort '13) worked with RAND colleagues to develop a roadmap with five objectives for the Chilean government to expand its health information technology capabilities over the next ten years.

  • The U.S.-China Cyber Agreement: A Good First Step

    Aug 1, 2016

    China's apparent compliance with the cyber agreement might represent little more than a temporary shift in tactics. Prof. Scott Harold says the U.S. should make clear that indictments may once again be sought if Chinese hackers resume cyber espionage against U.S. firms.

  • How to Counter Putin's Subversive War on the West

    Aug 1, 2016

    Russian cybercrime, Olympics doping, and other active measures have one thing in common: Moscow admits no wrongdoing. These scandals exacerbate the frigid relations between Moscow and the West. Diplomacy sometimes works slowly, but it helps, writes prof. Martin Libicki.

  • The High Cost of Free College

    Aug 1, 2016

    Subsidies may make institutions inclined to raise tuition since the government would foot the bill. One way to address this issue, writes prof. Trey Miller, is to develop and implement policies that encourage greater productivity from higher education institutions.

  • Faculty Leaders Program Trains Twelve More Policy Research Mentors

    Jul 29, 2016

    In the last four years, nearly 50 faculty members from 26 institutions across the United States have participated in the Pardee RAND Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development opportunity aimed at faculty serving highly diverse student bodies.

  • How Effective Are Military Academy Admission Standards?

    Jul 22, 2016

    Rigorous analyses by Susan Burkhauser and Mustafa Oguz (both cohort '09) of the selection processes for the U.S. Air Force Academy and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point show that the academies' processes predict students' future success as officers.

  • Afghan Government Support for Local Police Program Is Shaky

    Jul 21, 2016

    Established by U.S. and NATO special operations forces, the Afghan Local Police program was designed to become part of the Afghan Ministry of Interior Affairs (MOI). Research by Brian Gordon (cohort '12) indicates the MOI has made progress in logistics, personnel management, and training activities, but faces serious gaps in its ability to sustain the program.

  • Quality of Care in VA Health System Compares Well to Other Health Settings

    Jul 18, 2016

    The Veterans Affairs health care system generally performs better than or similar to other health care systems on providing safe and effective care to patients, with some exceptions, according to research by student Claire E. O'Hanlon (cohort '13), alum Christina Y. Huang (cohort '10), and professors Peter S. Hussey and Courtney A. Gidengil.

  • Fatal Crash Shouldn't Kill Self-Driving Cars

    Jul 16, 2016

    The first known fatality in an autonomous vehicle occurred on May 7 and raises important questions. It does not, however, mean that self-driving cars are less safe than human drivers or that development of the technology should be stopped, writes Prof. Nidhi Kalra.

  • U.S. Department of Defense Experiences with Substituting Government Employees for Military Personnel

    Jul 14, 2016

    There is considerable opportunity to identify positions suitable for military-to-civilian conversion, but there are numerous impediments to authorizing and executing military-to-civilian conversions, according to research by (then-students) Julia Pollak and Brian Gordon (both cohort '12), and professors Jennifer Lewis and Ed Keating.