Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • p201711_06, seminar, discussion

    Brown Faculty Chairs Share Highlights of 2017-18

    Aug 28, 2018

    Several research seminars, a ping-pong tournament, lunches, and cultural outings were among the highlights of the Brown Faculty Chair residencies by professors Kathryn Derose, Sebastian Linnemayr, and Andrew Parker.

  • Bird scooters outside a restaurant in Santa Monica, California, July 23, 2018

    A Better Way to Think About Scooters

    Aug 28, 2018

    Unleashed in Santa Monica last September, Bird and its competitors are now in more than 30 American cities—and are being met with new regulations and increased law enforcement. Student Tim McDonald (cohort '16) and Prof. Rob Lempert write that, if officials rely only on 20th-century tools to integrate these 21st-century scooters into their cities, they will miss a big opportunity.

  • ControVersus makes its debut at the Pardee RAND Tech Lab Pilot Demonstration Event, p201710_01, techlab, event, workshop, open house

    Tech Lab Pilot Game Encourages Political Discourse

    Aug 24, 2018

    New alum Claire O'Hanlon (cohort '13) created ControVersus as part of Pardee RAND's initial Tech Lab Pilot. The multiplayer card game helps people talk about politics and understand each other in a fun, nonjudgmental format. Her new website offers the game as a free download.

  • Face detection and recognition

    Keeping Artificial Intelligence Accountable to Humans

    Aug 20, 2018

    Artificial intelligence (AI) systems are often only as intelligent—and as fair—as the data used to train them. Prof. Osonde Osoba explains that, for AI that can free humans from bias instead of reinforcing bias, experts and regulators will need to think more deeply not only about what AI can do, but what it should do—and then teach it how.

  • Health care spending, money, medication, stethoscope

    Understanding the Impact of the Elimination of the Individual Mandate Penalty

    Aug 10, 2018

    Starting in 2019, the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate penalty will be eliminated, effectively ending the law's requirement that most people have health insurance. Profs. Christine Eibner and Sarah Nowak write that, while declines in coverage and increases in premiums are likely, the magnitudes of these effects are highly uncertain.

  • Group of hands holding puzzle pieces in a circle

    Potential Benefits for Most New Yorkers but No Free Lunch: Tough Decisions for Single-Payer Health Care in New York

    Aug 6, 2018

    A single-payer plan in New York would shift health-care spending to the state instead of private insurers, writes alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12). As with any far-reaching legislation, there are trade-offs and it is important that policymakers consider the impact of the single-payer plan in totality.

  • Patients in a busy waiting room

    New York's Proposed Single-Payer Plan Could Expand Coverage Without More Spending

    Aug 1, 2018

    The New York Health Act could provide insurance to all New York State residents without increasing overall spending if administrative costs are reduced and growth in provider payment rates is restrained, according to research by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), student Jamie Ryan ('17), and professors Christine Eibner, Sarah Nowak, and Chapin White. New taxes, instead of premiums and out-of-pocket payments, would finance the program.

  • A desk with 3D printing technology on top

    Downloadable Guns and Other 3-D Printing Security Threats

    Jul 31, 2018

    Americans may soon be able to legally access blueprints for 3D-printed guns. But the growing opposition to them shows that potential security threats do not have to be inevitable, write student Luke Irwin (cohort '16) and professors Troy Smith and Trevor Johnston. The security challenges inherent in 3D printing could be addressed, while the development of industry norms can still be shaped.

  • Ducklings and a swan gather on a sandbank in the Jamaica Bay neighborhood of New York City

    Building Resilience in an Urban Coastal Environment

    Jul 31, 2018

    Research by alum Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) examines the potential effects of climate change and sea level rise on flood risk, ecosystems, and water quality in New York City's Jamaica Bay, and how flood risk can be reduced while also improving water quality, restoring habitat, and improving resilience to extreme weather events.

  • Eco-friendly law and eco balance concept

    Suggestions to Help EPA Successfully Implement Retrospective Reviews

    Jul 19, 2018

    The EPA's interest in including a systematic retrospective review element in new regulation has the potential to provide a transparent and well-structured method for assessing which decisions worked well and which didn't, writes Prof. Benjamin Miller. If successful, it could serve as a role model for other regulatory agencies.

  • U.S. Army personnel with members of the Special Rescue Unit, Bureau of Fire Protection, National Capital Protection at Camp Aguinaldo, Manila, Philippines

    Assessing, Monitoring, and Evaluating Army Security Cooperation

    Jul 17, 2018

    The U.S. Army conducts security cooperation activities with partner nations to achieve several objectives. Gabriela Armenta (cohort '15) supported research that explored when Army security cooperation can have the greatest impact, and how the Army should assess, monitor, and evaluate its efforts.

  • wifi

    Developing a Manual for Cultural Analysis

    Jul 9, 2018

    Drawing from cognitive and evolutionary anthropology traditions, the authors describe a set of tools capable of dealing with cultural data at various emergent levels, ranging from variation among individuals within local subcultures to small- and large-scale network topologies and finally to longstanding lineages of inherited cultural information. This is the first time these techniques have been organized into a single manual structured around a formally theorized notion of culture.

  • Findings Highlights Commencement 2018

    Jun 28, 2018

    The Commencement issue of Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter includes articles about our biennial celebration, an interview with the Alumni Leadership Award recipient, and a spotlight on alumni donors Jeffrey Wasserman and Ted Harshberger.

  • Giving Spotlight: Alumni Jeffrey Wasserman and Ted Harshberger

    Jun 25, 2018

    Ted Harshberger (cohort '86) and Jeffrey Wasserman ('85) have long — and strong — ties not only to Pardee RAND but to the RAND Corporation itself. Ted is the Vice President and Director of Project AIR FORCE, and Jeffrey is the Vice President and Director of RAND Health. So it is no surprise that — when it comes time to support their alma mater and their company — Jeffrey and Ted don't hesitate.

  • Students Honor Selvin, Smith, and Armour with Huddleson Teaching Awards

    Jun 20, 2018

    For two years running, Professors Molly Selvin and Troy Smith received the Huddleson Teaching Award for excellence in teaching an elective and a core course (respectively). In 2017, Professor Phil Armour also received the award for teaching an elective. All three received their awards at the 2018 Pardee RAND Graduate School Commencement Ceremony.

  • Lawmakers from India's main opposition Congress party and the Janata Dal (Secular) protest against India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader B.S. Yeddyurappa's swearing-in as Chief Minister of the southern state of Karnataka, in Bengaluru, India, May 17, 2018

    Politics in India—Not Business as Usual

    Jun 19, 2018

    India's ruling party, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), has suffered recent, self-inflicted electoral setbacks, writes Prof. Rafiq Dossani. But it is still the best-organized and richest political party in the country. Can opposing alliances defeat the BJP?

  • Q&A with Alumni Leadership Award Winner Sharon Arnold

    Jun 18, 2018

    Sharon Arnold (cohort '85) received Pardee RAND's fourth Alumni Leadership Award during Commencement Weekend 2018. She sat down for a Q&A about her experience at the School and how her time at RAND has influenced her career, and also spoke at the Celebratory Dinner on Friday, June 15.

  • Students march as part of a national school walkout on March 14, 2018 to honor the 17 students and staff members killed on February 14 in Parkland, Florida

    From Florida's Farm Fields, Lessons for #MeToo and Other Movements

    Jun 15, 2018

    Organizers who want to bring about social change would do well to look to Florida farmworkers, writes Dean Susan Marquis. Those farmworkers took on the low wages, physical abuse, and vulnerability that have long characterized agricultural labor in the United States—and won, changing the culture for the better.

  • Lessons for Future U.S. Army Operations in and Through the Information Environment

    Jun 11, 2018

    Modern conflicts are fought as much in the information environment as on the physical battlefield, and the line between these domains is dissolving. Students Steve Davenport (cohort ’15) and Jakub Hlavka (’14) helped examine areas in which others excel to guide the U.S. Army in either adopting or countering these principles and practices.

  • John Seely Brown

    Innovator John Seely Brown to Address Pardee RAND Graduates

    Jun 8, 2018

    John Seely Brown, independent co-chairman of Deloitte's Center for the Edge, member of the Amazon board of directors, and former chief scientist of XEROX and director of research and development hub PARC, will make the keynote address at the commencement exercises of the Frederick S. Pardee RAND Graduate School in Santa Monica on June 16.

  • Aerial view of Miami, Florida

    Adapting to a Changing Climate in Southeast Florida

    Jun 6, 2018

    Florida's Miami-Dade and Broward counties are vulnerable to flooding and intrusion of saltwater into drinking water. These risks are driven by sea level rise, changes in precipitation, and urban development. Alum David Groves (cohort '01) and colleagues ask, how can the region adapt?

  • Pardee RAND Mental Health Week 2018, p201805_05, activities, yoga, tai chi, pet therapy, crafts, music, claire ohanlan, rushil zutshi, alexandra mendoza graf, etienne rosas

    Mental Health Week Helps Students Relax — or Rock Out

    Jun 6, 2018

    CoCom organized Pardee RAND's third annual Mental Health Awareness Week last month to help students decompress before finals. Activities included pet therapy, tai chi, massage, yoga, a picnic lunch and yes, a jam session.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (right) and North Korean official Kim Yong Chol (left) meet with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the truce village of Panmunjom, North Korea, May 26, 2018

    North Korea Is Not Like Libya

    Jun 1, 2018

    The prospect of a U.S.-North Korea summit has led to analogies between the present case and that of Libya, which abandoned its longstanding quest to develop nuclear weapons in 2003. But Prof. Karl Mueller says a better precedent would be the 2015 deal that froze Iran's nuclear weapons program.

  • A woman and two men in hard hats on a construction site

    Bridge to Opportunities: Connecting Probationers to High-Wage Jobs

    May 25, 2018

    Probation agencies face significant challenges to helping their clients find jobs, and earn living wages. Student Lisa Jonsson (cohort '14) and colleagues highlight one program in the construction industry that aimed to improve the earning potential of individuals on probation in Sacramento County, California.

  • Group of college students in class

    The Case for Corequisites: What Are the Ingredients of Success?

    May 23, 2018

    More than two-thirds of community college students and 40 percent of four-year college students take at least one developmental education course. Alum Lindsey Daugherty (cohort '05) writes that states and colleges across the United States are experimenting with innovative approaches to developmental education to improve graduation rates for struggling students.