Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Statement from the Dean on Racial Injustice

    The call for social justice that has swept across our nation and the world over this past week demands that we listen, learn, and do more to “shine the light that reveals the dust” and to do the hard work of building a better world not just this week but for years to come. It is my fervent hope that our community will rise to the occasion and live up to our motto, Be the Answer.

  • Coronavirus shown against world map and trend lines, illustration by chakisatelier/Adobe Stock

    Responding to COVID-19 with Research and Analysis

    Members of the Pardee RAND community are actively contributing to the COVID-19 response by sharing their expertise and searching for solutions to coronavirus-related challenges on local, state, national, and global levels.

  • Drawing fluid from bottle with needle, photo by ashtproductions/Adobe Stock

    Alum Coordinating UCLA Clinical Trials of COVID-19 Therapies

    Apr 3, 2020

    Alum Arash Naeim (cohort '99), chief medical officer for clinical research for UCLA Health, is co-chairing a clinical research task force that is coordinating tests of the anti-viral drug remdesivir and other therapies against COVID-19.

  • A worn-down prison block, photo by Tracy King/Adobe Stock

    Prof: Incarceration Rates Provide Key Measure of Health in America

    Apr 3, 2020

    There's widespread agreement that incarceration has adverse effects on health and health equity, not just for prisoners but also for families and communities, writes Prof. Douglas Yeung. That's one important reason why incarceration in the United States needs to be reduced.

  • Agricultural workers clean carrot crops of weeds amid an outbreak of COVID-19 at a farm near Arvin, California, April 3, 2020, photo by Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

    Dean: Farmworkers Are Forgotten on the Frontlines of the Food Supply Chain

    Apr 3, 2020

    The working and living conditions of farmworkers make practicing social distancing, self-isolation, or quarantine impossible, writes Dean Susan Marquis. In the food supply, farmworkers are the first responders who keep the supply chains going. FEMA, the CDC, and state governments should include farmworkers and agricultural communities in their emergency response plans.

  • Hospital workers are seen near a tent erected to test for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York, March 19, 2020, photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters

    Students Contribute to New Tool to Help Health Officials Plan for COVID-19 Patient Surge

    Apr 3, 2020

    Hospitals are searching for ways to ramp up their surge capacity to provide critical care for the sickest COVID-19 patients. Students Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and Hamad Al-Ibrahim ('18) helped to develop a user-friendly calculator that enables decisionmakers at all levels to estimate current critical care capacity and rapidly explore strategies for increasing it.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C., January 19, 2020, photo by Will Dunham/Reuters

    Prof: What If the Supreme Court Strikes Down the ACA During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

    Apr 3, 2020

    With COVID-19 spreading across the United States, the fate of the Affordable Care Act is once again up in the air, hanging on the outcome of a Supreme Court case. If the law is overturned, writes Prof. Christine Eibner, upwards of 20 million people could lose their health insurance during one of the deadliest pandemics in modern history.

  • Ambulances seen outside NYU Langone Hospital's Emergency entrance during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in New York City, March 31, 2020, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    Students: Promising Strategies for Creating Critical Care Capacity in U.S. Hospitals

    Apr 3, 2020

    Hospitals can prepare for a surge of patients critically ill with COVID-19, but it will require hospital leaders, practitioners, and regional officials to adopt drastic measures that challenge the standard way of providing care. Students Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and Hamad Al Ibrahim ('18) worked with RAND colleagues to develop a tool to help estimate current capacity and explore ways to increase it.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un observes the firing of suspected missiles in this image released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on March 22, 2020, photo by KCNA/Reuters

    Alum and Student: North Korea Is Denying COVID-19

    Apr 2, 2020

    According to North Korean authorities, North Korea has not yet suffered any cases of COVID-19. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) and student Diana Myers ('19) say that is very surprising, given that North Korea is a neighbor and extensive trading partner of China, where the disease initially flourished. There are signs that the absence of COVID-19 cases in North Korea is yet another North Korean deception.

  • A girl doing schoolwork on a laptop computer, photo by ijeab/Getty Images

    Prof: For Instruction, Online Doesn't Have to Mean Impersonal

    Apr 2, 2020

    Children's needs extend beyond the purely academic, write Prof. Elizabeth Steiner and RAND colleagues. It is important that their social and emotional well-being is supported as instruction moves online during the COVID-19 pandemic. A whole-child view of what students need could benefit them now more than ever.

  • Group of people with their hands on top of one another, photo by PeopleImages/Getty Images

    Student Helps Evaluate the WhyWeRise Mental Health Campaign

    Apr 1, 2020

    Rebecca de Guttry (cohort '18) conducted interviews and analyzed a survey to evaluate WhyWeRise, a community engagement mental health campaign. The research indicates that the campaign reached at least 30 percent of Los Angeles County youth and mobilized them to improve social support for those experiencing mental health challenges.

  • An empty market after a curfew was imposed to halt the spread of COVID-19 in the holy city of Najaf, Iraq, March 18, 2020

    Prof Considers Economic Consequences of COVID-19 in the Middle East, Implications for U.S. National Security

    Apr 1, 2020

    The global COVID-19 pandemic will have a dramatic impact on economies across the globe, but the Middle East may be particularly affected given the simultaneous fall in oil prices, writes Prof. Howard Shatz. The economic consequences of this pandemic are also likely to affect U.S. interests in the region.

  • A worker checks part of a delivery of hospital beds to The Mount Sinai Hospital during the COVID-19 outbreak, New York City, March 31, 2020, photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters

    Prof: Implement Critical Care Surge Strategies Now to Save Lives

    Apr 1, 2020

    As COVID-19 continues to spread, hospitals are bracing for a surge of patients requiring critical care. To meet the demand, Prof. Christopher Nelson says U.S. health care facilities may need to fundamentally change the way they allocate space, staff, and equipment.

  • Coronavirus and financial stock market crisis, illustration by denisismagilov/Adobe Stock

    Alum Estimates Economic Benefits of California's Stay-at-Home Policy

    Apr 1, 2020

    Joe Nation (cohort '85), a professor of the practice of public policy at Stanford University, calculated the net cost of the state's stay-at-home order. "National and state leaders who claim to be putting the economy first are in fact putting it last. Saving lives also saves the economy," he found.

  • The U.S. Navy hospital ship Comfort passes the Statue of Liberty as it enters New York Harbor during the COVID-19 outbreak, March 30, 2020, photo by Mike Segar/Reuters

    Prof: After COVID-19, America Needs to Reengage with the World, Not Retreat

    Apr 1, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic should lead to a further strengthening of the national and international response capacity, writes Prof. Krishna Kumar. The alternative of erecting barriers and closing America off to the world would leave it more vulnerable to the next big shock.

  • Children pick up lunch at the Olympic Hills Elementary School, after schools were closed due to the COVID-19 outbreak, in Seattle, Washington, March 17, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Profs Examine Food Access Challenges and Solutions Brought on by COVID-19

    Mar 31, 2020

    For the 14.3 million American households already experiencing food insecurity, COVID-19 shutdowns and restrictions have created new layers of hardship, write professors Tamara Dubowitz and Andrea Richardson. Tremendous efforts are already underway to make sure the food insecure aren't forgotten in the midst of so much other disruption. But the weeks to come will surely demand more creative solutions from the public and private sectors, particularly for the most vulnerable in our communities.

  • Shot of a young businesswoman using a digital tablet during a late night at work, photo by PeopleImages/Getty Images

    Alum, Student Examine Software Acquisition Workforce Initiative for the Department of Defense

    Mar 31, 2020

    The U.S. Department of Defense seeks to advance the ability of its software acquisition workforce to rapidly and reliably deliver complex software-dependent capabilities. Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) and Lindsey Polley ('16) ask, what competencies are needed for an effective software acquisition workforce?

  • Cyber warfare specialists engage in weekend training at Warfield Air National Guard Base in Middle River, Maryland, June 3, 2017, photo by J.M. Eddins Jr./U.S. Air Force

    Student: Defense Industrial Base Needs a Cyber Protection Program

    Mar 30, 2020

    The unclassified networks of defense industrial base firms have become a target for adversaries seeking to steal sensitive data, trade secrets, and intellectual property. Student Lindsey Polley (cohort '16) and RAND colleagues examine how the U.S. Department of Defense can better secure these networks.

  • An employee checks the temperature of a man at the entrance of a supermarket, as the spread of COVID-19 continues, Milan, Italy March 23, 2020, photo by Daniele Mascolo/Reuters

    Alum Shares Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus

    Mar 30, 2020

    Alum Michele Zanini (cohort '96) coauthored a Harvard Business Review article "to help U.S. and European policymakers at all levels learn from Italy’s mistakes so they can recognize and address the unprecedented challenges presented by the rapidly expanding crisis."

  • Quarterly Newsletter Highlights Golden Anniversary

    Mar 27, 2020

    Pardee RAND is proud of its 50 years of policy impact, as well as its research contributions to the current coronavirus crisis. The school's newsletter features updates on how the school is responding to current challenges, cool student and alumni research trips to Alaska and Antarctica, and an exciting student research showcase, among other news.

  • Man stands inside of old dark tunnel, photo by evannovostro/Adobe Stock

    Alum: A Few Hints of Light at the End of the Tunnel

    Mar 27, 2020

    Alum Loren Yager (cohort '87) writes, "There is no question that this is a world-changing event and that all the social distancing and other preparatory measures need to be taken as quickly and seriously as possible. But at the same time, we also need to see that there are some faint reasons for hope as we try to come to grips with the need to hunker down for months in our homes."

  • A Marine fires a Javelin during Operation Lava Viper at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, May 27, 2015, photo by Cpl. Ricky Gomez/U.S. Marine Corps

    Alum: FY21 USMC Budget Indicates Institutional Inertia

    Mar 26, 2020

    The Grim Reaper is a 700 foot tall series of hills at Camp Pendleton that Marine recruits must summit to graduate from boot camp, writes alum Jon Wong (cohort '12). As the Marine Corps attempts to transform itself from a second land army and counterinsurgency force to operate within contested maritime spaces, the recently released FY21 budget request suggests that it will need to climb its own Grim Reaper to get there.