Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Pardee RAND Party Celebrates the Season

    Dec 18, 2017

    Students, faculty, staff and alumni gathered for a fun evening in December to celebrate the holidays (and end of exams).

  • Justice for Florida Farmworkers: Q&A with Dean Susan Marquis

    Dec 15, 2017

    In her new book, Dean Susan Marquis takes readers inside the fight in Florida tomato fields. She traces the history and victories of a grassroots group of farmworkers and community leaders who wrested better wages and working conditions from major tomato growers and their corporate buyers.

  • Fall 2017 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Dec 13, 2017

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features the creative results of a Tech Lab pilot. Other articles highlight "Pardee RANDroid," the school's new robot; a student-published newspaper; Dean Marquis' book, I Am Not A Tractor!; APPAM presentations, and more.

  • Dean's Book Delves into Florida Fields' Transformation

    Dec 11, 2017

    In I Am Not a Tractor!, Dean Susan Marquis celebrates the courage of Florida farmworkers and community leaders who transformed one of the worst agricultural situations in the United States into one of the best.

  • Pardee Times Provides Outlet for Student Creativity

    Dec 8, 2017

    Pardee RAND students launched a new student publication last year that is written, edited, operated, and distributed entirely by students. Pardee Times has published three editions since February 2017.

  • Tech Lab Pilot Designed Solutions to Improve Civil Discourse

    Dec 7, 2017

    A key element within the blueprint of Pardee RAND for 2020 is the development of a technology lab. Nine students participated in a pilot exploring how technology can improve civil discourse. Their experience will also help inform design efforts for a full-scale lab.

  • Promising Approaches to Army Institutional Change

    Dec 5, 2017

    The U.S. Army faces challenges including behavioral health issues, misconduct, and adjustment to changing demographics. Student Adeyemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) and alum Ben Batorsky (cohort' 12) found that long-term solutions will require changes in Army culture and climate. Such changes are difficult, but promising strategies do exist.

  • Housing People Experiencing Homelessness May Save Money

    Dec 5, 2017

    Housing for Health provides permanent supportive housing to people in Los Angeles County with complex medical and behavioral health issues. Student Melody Harvey (cohort '12) found that, after one year, participants reported dramatic reductions in use of public services, such as emergency medical care, resulting in a net cost savings of 20 percent.

  • Pardee RANDroid Takes a Spin on Campus

    Dec 1, 2017

    Rolling down the halls of the school, the new Pardee RAND robot, nicknamed Pardee RANDroid, can cause quite the stir. At just over five feet tall, the robot gives its remote users a visibility and presence far surpassing a videoconferencing screen.

  • Is Iron Dome a Poisoned Chalice? Strategic Risks from Tactical Success

    Nov 29, 2017

    While Iron Dome's past success in defending Israel makes it a tempting solution to future challenges, it does have shortcomings. Student Elizabeth Bartels (cohort '15) says this becomes even more serious when considering using the system in Korea, where the threat posed is substantially greater, and the targeted terrain substantially harder to defend.

  • All for One and One for All: Toward a Coordinated EU Approach on Returnees

    Nov 28, 2017

    To combat the threat posed by returning fighters, EU intelligence and police agencies will need to coordinate to find potential terrorists before they are able to conduct attacks in Europe. Prof. Colin Clarke says the return of dangerous foreign fighters to European soil should be motivation enough for an overarching review of each country’s vulnerabilities.

  • Environmental Impact Bonds May Not Bear Fruit for Green Investors

    Nov 26, 2017

    Investors may be willing to accept a lower return for socially responsible investments. But analysis supported by the Cazier Initiative suggests environmental impact bonds may not be the best way to leverage these investment possibilities.

  • Drones Could Deliver Change to Africa

    Nov 17, 2017

    Drones have potential on the African continent to transform urban and rural infrastructure and enhance agricultural productivity, writes Prof. Shira Efron (alum, cohort '11). But deployment of drones in Africa still faces technological, economic, social, and legal and regulatory challenges.

  • How Hot Is Too Hot? Rising Temperatures and the Workplace

    Nov 16, 2017

    Climate change is here. Future extreme heat waves are a given and will likely grow in intensity, geographic reach, and duration. Student Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort 14) says plans need to be made now to ensure survival of the poorest, to protect outdoor workers and to adapt economic planning to what is increasingly becoming a hotter planet.

  • America Is Great at Fighting Terrorism, but Terror Is Alive and Well

    Nov 16, 2017

    When terrorists adopt a strategy of pure terror, it is challenging to prevent attacks like those seen in Nice, Columbus, London, Barcelona, or New York. Instead, writes Prof. Henry Willis, strategies are needed to counter terrorism's ultimate aim, to instill fear, and to remove some of the incentives of those who might be motivated to conduct them.

  • RAND Tribute to U.S. Air Force Honors Natalie Crawford, Don and Susan Rice

    Nov 16, 2017

    One Night with RAND, a November fundraising event, paid tribute to the achievements of Pardee RAND faculty member Natalie W. Crawford and longtime Pardee RAND supporters Donald B. and Susan F. Rice.

  • Early Childhood Programs Can Improve Outcomes and Outweigh Costs

    Nov 16, 2017

    Students Ashley Muchow (cohort '13) and Maya Buenaventura (cohort '14) worked with professors Jill Cannon, Lynne Karoly, and Rebecca Kilburn to review 115 early childhood interventions — including preschool, home visiting, parent education, and other approaches. They found that most programs have favorable effects on at least one child outcome, and most of the programs with benefit–cost analyses show positive returns.

  • U.S. Health System Should Prepare for Future Alzheimer's Treatments

    Nov 15, 2017

    Advanced clinical trials are underway for at least 10 promising therapies for Alzheimer's disease. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) found that the U.S. health care system lacks the capacity to rapidly move a treatment from approval into wide clinical use. Millions of people could miss out on transformative care if such a breakthrough occurs.

  • Twenty Pardee RANDites Present at APPAM in Chicago

    Nov 10, 2017

    Alumni, students and faculty converged on Chicago for APPAM's 39th annual fall research conference November 2–4. The theme of the conference was Measurement Matters: Better Data for Better Decisions.

  • The Looming Pension Crisis

    Nov 8, 2017

    California leads the nation in pension underfunding. The state government has $464.4 billion in unfunded liabilities — the difference between resources that will be available in the state's pension fund and what will be owed to retiring employees. Executive Vice Dean Dan Grunfeld explains that, as dire as the problem is now, it could double over the next 12 years.

  • Recovering from a Nuclear Attack on a U.S. City

    Nov 7, 2017

    Responding after a nuclear attack will require having planned and prepared for problems that are very different than those encountered after hurricanes and earthquakes, writes Prof. David Shlapak. U.S. cities are inadequately prepared to handle a disaster of this magnitude.

  • How Safe Should Autonomous Vehicles Be Before They're Introduced to Market?

    Nov 7, 2017

    Prof Nidhi Kalra and alum David G. Groves (cohort '01) developed a model to compare 500 different scenarios of autonomous vehicle introduction, adoption, and improvement. The research shows that putting autonomous vehicles on the road sooner, allowing them to improve quicker, could save hundreds of thousands of lives over time.

  • The Long-Term Budget Shortfall and National Security: A Problem the U.S. Should Stop Avoiding

    Nov 6, 2017

    Bold promises and even actions that balance the budget for the short term should not mask the fact that the U.S. government has failed to face its long-term budget problems. Without changes, writes. Prof Howard Shatz, the ability to pay for many functions — including defense — will rely wholly on borrowed money.

  • New York Terror Attack: Can Vehicle Attacks Be Prevented?

    Nov 1, 2017

    The recent vehicle attack in Manhattan was the deadliest terror attack on New York since 9/11. Preventing every attack is unrealistic, writes Prof. Colin Clarke, but with increased vigilance, cooperation with law enforcement, and intelligence sharing, citizens can help mitigate the threat of terrorism.

  • Candy Out of Sight, Out of Mind

    Oct 31, 2017

    CVS is cutting back on candy at the cash register, making junk food less visible and “healthier” snacks easier to find. Any move that nudges consumers toward healthier choices should be applauded, writes Prof. Deborah Cohen, but CVS could take the lead as a retailer and do away with junk food displays by the cash register altogether.