Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Statement from the Dean on Racial Injustice

    The call for social justice that has swept across our nation and the world over this past week demands that we listen, learn, and do more to “shine the light that reveals the dust” and to do the hard work of building a better world not just this week but for years to come. It is my fervent hope that our community will rise to the occasion and live up to our motto, Be the Answer.

  • Coronavirus shown against world map and trend lines, illustration by chakisatelier/Adobe Stock

    Responding to COVID-19 with Research and Analysis

    Members of the Pardee RAND community are actively contributing to the COVID-19 response by sharing their expertise and searching for solutions to coronavirus-related challenges on local, state, national, and global levels.

  • Commercial trucks cross over the Ambassador Bridge at the international border crossing during the COVID-19 outbreak, in Detroit, Michigan, March 18, 2020, photo by Rebecca Cook/Reuters

    Profs Examine Supply Chain Disruptions Due to COVID-19 and Social Distancing

    Apr 28, 2020

    The physical distancing policies put into effect in the United States to reduce the growth of COVID-19 entail significant epidemiological and economic risks and uncertainties. Professors Aaron Strong and Jonathan Welburn have estimated the economy-wide impacts of a set of these policies to provide a sense of their likely economic toll.

  • Residents carry boxes of free groceries distributed at a pop-up food pantry by the Massachusetts Army National Guard in Chelsea, Massachusetts, April 24, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Prof Examines Second Wave of COVID Consequences

    Apr 24, 2020

    Economists closely watch measures of consumer confidence because they are highly predictive economic indicators. Prof. Kathryn Edwards says new consumer data reveals likely long-term and prolonged economic fallout.

  • Housekeeper washing the dishes wearing a mask, photo by FG Trade/Getty Images

    Profs: Government Should Do More to Protect Household Employers and Workers

    Apr 23, 2020

    As the federal government extends aid to people put out of work by the COVID-19 pandemic, professors Shanthi Nataraj and Krishna Kumar write, it could do more to help one group of employers and the vital American workers they employ: hundreds of thousands of nannies, housekeepers, and others employed in private homes.

  • U.S. Army Major Shandel Panneton and 1st Lieutenant Autumn Kruse verify patient census and bed status information at the Javits New York Medical Station which supports local hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak, in New York City, April 8, 2020, photo by Spc. Nathan Hammack/U.S. Army via Reuters

    Students Help Develop Interactive Tool for Strategizing Hospital Critical Care Capacity

    Apr 17, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is placing extraordinary strains on the U.S. medical system, especially hospitals. Hamad Al-Ibrahim (cohort '18) and Karishma Patel ('17) worked with Prof. Chris Nelson and RAND colleagues to develop an interactive tool hospitals can use to estimate their current critical care capacity and rapidly explore strategies for increasing it.

  • Naomi Hassebroek holds her son Felix while working with her husband Doug Hassebroek at their home, during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brooklyn, New York, March 19, 2020, photo by Caitlin Ochs/Reuters

    Prof: Can We Emerge from COVID-19 with a Healthier Work Culture?

    Apr 16, 2020

    American families want greater choices in determining how their work and their families fit together. Post-pandemic, can we create a system that fits workers? If so, Prof. Heather Williams says we have the opportunity to emerge from this crisis with both healthier employees and better performing organizations.

  • A woman prays alone in Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church on Palm Sunday amid the COVID-19 outbreak in Worcester, Massachusetts, April 5, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Profs: The Important Role of Faith-Based Organizations in the Context of COVID-19

    Apr 16, 2020

    Maintaining social and spiritual connections in the midst of COVID-19 are not the only challenges facing communities of faith. Prof. Kathryn Pitkin Derose and Pardee RAND Practitioner in Residence Michael Mata say congregations play critical roles in providing social services within communities.

  • A teacher at a desk with a tablet and a laptop, photo by FluxFactory/Getty Images

    Student Explores What Digital Materials Teachers Use

    Apr 16, 2020

    Digital materials for lesson planning and instruction are becoming an increasingly important resource for teachers. Ashley Woo (cohort '18) and RAND colleagues surveyed English language arts, mathematics, and science teachers across the United States for insights on which materials they use and what they consider barriers to use.

  • Laid-off white-collar employee taking his office supplies with him, photo by Ty/Adobe Stock

    WSJ Quotes Alum on White-Collar Unemployment

    Apr 14, 2020

    Julia Pollak (cohort '12), a labor economist for ZipRecruiter, explains why few are safe from the second round of coronavirus layoffs: “Any company that had been planning to open a second location, that hired an architect, an office designer, and contractor—they’re not opening that location this year and those people now won’t have jobs."

  • Project Shares COVID-19 Resources for LAUSD Families

    Apr 14, 2020

    The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) faces numerous challenges because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Pardee RAND is partnering with the district and Pepperdine University to share information about a wide variety of community resources available to parents and students.

  • Multi-ethnic group of women, photo by andresr/Getty Images

    Alum: COVID-19 Offers Chance to Study the Impact of Sex and Gender

    Apr 13, 2020

    Much of current medical evidence is based largely on men, writes alum Denise Quigley (cohort '91) with RAND colleagues. The current COVID-19 pandemic presents a unique opportunity to examine the potential value of asking questions about sex and gender differences to inform ongoing policy decisions.

  • Temporary closed signage is seen at a store in Manhattan following the outbreak of COVID-19, in New York City, March 15, 2020, photo by Jeenah Moon/Reuters

    Profs on the Danger of Converting a Health Crisis into a Financial Crisis

    Apr 13, 2020

    The impulse to do something to help businesses right now is well-intended, but lending to companies that were highly leveraged pre-crisis is a risky bet, write professors Krishna Kumar, Shanthi Nataraj, and Jonathan Welburn. Assistance could be best directed toward sound enterprises that are likely to survive and contribute to boosting the economy in the coming years.

  • Woman begins drive-through coronavirus testing, photo by Robert Kneschke/Adobe Stock

    Alum Leads USC Effort to Test for Coronavirus Antibodies

    Apr 13, 2020

    Neeraj Sood (cohort '99) is leading a USC study with L.A. County to test the blood of 1,000 randomly selected individuals for COVID-19 antibodies. “The test will provide fundamental information about the deadliness of the disease, if policy measures like social distancing are working, and also how long the pandemic is likely to last,” he said.

  • Bus driver wears a face mask to protect himself from the coronavirus epidemic, photo by Uliana Nadorozhna/Adobe Stock

    Alum on Why Twice as Many Black D.C. Residents Have COVID-19 as Their White Peers

    Apr 9, 2020

    Alum Janice Blanchard (cohort '98), an associate professor of emergency medicine at George Washington University Hospital who studies racial disparities in U.S. healthcare: “Social distancing is very hard to do … when you have to get on a bus every day to go to work.”

  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda checks in to a council meeting by phone due to the council's temporary work from home policy during the COVID-19 outbreak in Seattle, Washington, March 23, 2020, photo by Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

    Prof on Parenting Through the Pandemic: Who's Working, Who's Caring for the Kids, and What Policies Might Help

    Apr 8, 2020

    To help inform policy decisions that could help working parents affected by COVID-19, Prof. Kathryn Edwards examined the U.S. Department of Labor's Current Population Survey and recent coronavirus relief acts. Our review shows us what aid working parents might expect and what kinds of aid policymakers might consider going forward.

  • Kevin Keeley, who has been experiencing homelessness for eight months and may have come into contact with someone with COVID-19, stands outside a quarantine tent in Boston, Massachusetts, April 2, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Prof Examines Emergency Homeless Services During the COVID-19 Crisis

    Apr 7, 2020

    The recently passed $2 trillion stimulus package includes a suite of measures designed to support households that are affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. But Prof. Sarah Hunter says policymakers may want to consider what protections the package offers to a particularly high-risk group: people experiencing homelessness.

  • An aerial view of the Pentagon building in Washington D.C., June 15, 2005, photo by Jason Reed/Reuters

    Alum, Profs Examine Defense Budget Implications of the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Apr 7, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is taking a dramatic toll on the U.S. economy. This could have significant medium-term implications for the U.S. defense budget, write alum Ted Harshberger (cohort '86) and professors Krishna Kumar and Howard Shatz. The U.S. Department of Defense will need to find efficiencies that are of at least the same magnitude as the recent sequestration.

  • Adult son comforting his father who is not feeling well, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Prof: The Public Charge Rule's Likely Hazard to Our Nation's Health During COVID-19

    Apr 6, 2020

    The Public Charge rule makes immigrants who receive Medicaid and other publicly-funded benefits potentially ineligible for green cards, and, in some cases, subjects them to deportation. Prof. Kathryn Derose says fear and reluctance to seek assistance among immigrants is likely to worsen during the COVID-19 epidemic.

  • People wait in line to file for unemployment following an outbreak of COVID-19 at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fort Smith, Arkansas, April 6, 2020, photo by Nick Oxford/Reuters

    Prof: Millions Need Unemployment Benefits. Unfortunately, the Delivery System Is Broken

    Apr 6, 2020

    More than 10 million Americans filed for unemployment insurance in March as businesses closed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The stimulus package passed in March enacted welcome measures to tide people over, but Prof. Kathryn Edwards says these temporary fixes don't address the structural problems that will continue to plague unemployment benefit programs after the infusion of cash runs out.

  • A sign hangs on a door stating that it does not need to be cleaned, in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2020, photo by Alexander Drago/Reuters

    Prof: During Coronavirus Pandemic, Can Congress Members Do Their Jobs by Teleworking?

    Apr 6, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic presents a new challenge to how Congress conducts business, writes Prof. Quentin Hodgson. How can the United States leverage existing technologies so lawmakers can continue to work safely and securely?

  • Man at home working on a computer, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Prof: After the Crisis, Should the Federal Workforce Stay Remote?

    Apr 3, 2020

    As physical distancing becomes the new norm, so too does telework. But Prof. Kathryn Edwards and RAND colleagues ask, should federal agencies maintain their remote operations for the long haul? As those involved with national security agencies, operations, and workforce issues know, this is not a decision to make lightly.