Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Statement from the Dean on Racial Injustice

    The call for social justice that has swept across our nation and the world over this past week demands that we listen, learn, and do more to “shine the light that reveals the dust” and to do the hard work of building a better world not just this week but for years to come. It is my fervent hope that our community will rise to the occasion and live up to our motto, Be the Answer.

  • Coronavirus shown against world map and trend lines, illustration by chakisatelier/Adobe Stock

    Responding to COVID-19 with Research and Analysis

    Members of the Pardee RAND community are actively contributing to the COVID-19 response by sharing their expertise and searching for solutions to coronavirus-related challenges on local, state, national, and global levels.

  • Woman begins drive-through coronavirus testing, photo by Robert Kneschke/Adobe Stock

    Alum Leads USC Effort to Test for Coronavirus Antibodies

    Apr 13, 2020

    Neeraj Sood (cohort '99) is leading a USC study with L.A. County to test the blood of 1,000 randomly selected individuals for COVID-19 antibodies. “The test will provide fundamental information about the deadliness of the disease, if policy measures like social distancing are working, and also how long the pandemic is likely to last,” he said.

  • Bus driver wears a face mask to protect himself from the coronavirus epidemic, photo by Uliana Nadorozhna/Adobe Stock

    Alum on Why Twice as Many Black D.C. Residents Have COVID-19 as Their White Peers

    Apr 9, 2020

    Alum Janice Blanchard (cohort '98), an associate professor of emergency medicine at George Washington University Hospital who studies racial disparities in U.S. healthcare: “Social distancing is very hard to do … when you have to get on a bus every day to go to work.”

  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda checks in to a council meeting by phone due to the council's temporary work from home policy during the COVID-19 outbreak in Seattle, Washington, March 23, 2020, photo by Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

    Prof on Parenting Through the Pandemic: Who's Working, Who's Caring for the Kids, and What Policies Might Help

    Apr 8, 2020

    To help inform policy decisions that could help working parents affected by COVID-19, Prof. Kathryn Edwards examined the U.S. Department of Labor's Current Population Survey and recent coronavirus relief acts. Our review shows us what aid working parents might expect and what kinds of aid policymakers might consider going forward.

  • Kevin Keeley, who has been experiencing homelessness for eight months and may have come into contact with someone with COVID-19, stands outside a quarantine tent in Boston, Massachusetts, April 2, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Prof Examines Emergency Homeless Services During the COVID-19 Crisis

    Apr 7, 2020

    The recently passed $2 trillion stimulus package includes a suite of measures designed to support households that are affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. But Prof. Sarah Hunter says policymakers may want to consider what protections the package offers to a particularly high-risk group: people experiencing homelessness.

  • An aerial view of the Pentagon building in Washington D.C., June 15, 2005, photo by Jason Reed/Reuters

    Alum, Profs Examine Defense Budget Implications of the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Apr 7, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is taking a dramatic toll on the U.S. economy. This could have significant medium-term implications for the U.S. defense budget, write alum Ted Harshberger (cohort '86) and professors Krishna Kumar and Howard Shatz. The U.S. Department of Defense will need to find efficiencies that are of at least the same magnitude as the recent sequestration.

  • Adult son comforting his father who is not feeling well, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Prof: The Public Charge Rule's Likely Hazard to Our Nation's Health During COVID-19

    Apr 6, 2020

    The Public Charge rule makes immigrants who receive Medicaid and other publicly-funded benefits potentially ineligible for green cards, and, in some cases, subjects them to deportation. Prof. Kathryn Derose says fear and reluctance to seek assistance among immigrants is likely to worsen during the COVID-19 epidemic.

  • People wait in line to file for unemployment following an outbreak of COVID-19 at an Arkansas Workforce Center in Fort Smith, Arkansas, April 6, 2020, photo by Nick Oxford/Reuters

    Prof: Millions Need Unemployment Benefits. Unfortunately, the Delivery System Is Broken

    Apr 6, 2020

    More than 10 million Americans filed for unemployment insurance in March as businesses closed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The stimulus package passed in March enacted welcome measures to tide people over, but Prof. Kathryn Edwards says these temporary fixes don't address the structural problems that will continue to plague unemployment benefit programs after the infusion of cash runs out.

  • A sign hangs on a door stating that it does not need to be cleaned, in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2020, photo by Alexander Drago/Reuters

    Prof: During Coronavirus Pandemic, Can Congress Members Do Their Jobs by Teleworking?

    Apr 6, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic presents a new challenge to how Congress conducts business, writes Prof. Quentin Hodgson. How can the United States leverage existing technologies so lawmakers can continue to work safely and securely?

  • Man at home working on a computer, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Prof: After the Crisis, Should the Federal Workforce Stay Remote?

    Apr 3, 2020

    As physical distancing becomes the new norm, so too does telework. But Prof. Kathryn Edwards and RAND colleagues ask, should federal agencies maintain their remote operations for the long haul? As those involved with national security agencies, operations, and workforce issues know, this is not a decision to make lightly.

  • Drawing fluid from bottle with needle, photo by ashtproductions/Adobe Stock

    Alum Coordinating UCLA Clinical Trials of COVID-19 Therapies

    Apr 3, 2020

    Alum Arash Naeim (cohort '99), chief medical officer for clinical research for UCLA Health, is co-chairing a clinical research task force that is coordinating tests of the anti-viral drug remdesivir and other therapies against COVID-19.

  • A worn-down prison block, photo by Tracy King/Adobe Stock

    Prof: Incarceration Rates Provide Key Measure of Health in America

    Apr 3, 2020

    There's widespread agreement that incarceration has adverse effects on health and health equity, not just for prisoners but also for families and communities, writes Prof. Douglas Yeung. That's one important reason why incarceration in the United States needs to be reduced.

  • Agricultural workers clean carrot crops of weeds amid an outbreak of COVID-19 at a farm near Arvin, California, April 3, 2020, photo by Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

    Dean: Farmworkers Are Forgotten on the Frontlines of the Food Supply Chain

    Apr 3, 2020

    The working and living conditions of farmworkers make practicing social distancing, self-isolation, or quarantine impossible, writes Dean Susan Marquis. In the food supply, farmworkers are the first responders who keep the supply chains going. FEMA, the CDC, and state governments should include farmworkers and agricultural communities in their emergency response plans.

  • Hospital workers are seen near a tent erected to test for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York, March 19, 2020, photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters

    Students Contribute to New Tool to Help Health Officials Plan for COVID-19 Patient Surge

    Apr 3, 2020

    Hospitals are searching for ways to ramp up their surge capacity to provide critical care for the sickest COVID-19 patients. Students Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and Hamad Al-Ibrahim ('18) helped to develop a user-friendly calculator that enables decisionmakers at all levels to estimate current critical care capacity and rapidly explore strategies for increasing it.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C., January 19, 2020, photo by Will Dunham/Reuters

    Prof: What If the Supreme Court Strikes Down the ACA During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

    Apr 3, 2020

    With COVID-19 spreading across the United States, the fate of the Affordable Care Act is once again up in the air, hanging on the outcome of a Supreme Court case. If the law is overturned, writes Prof. Christine Eibner, upwards of 20 million people could lose their health insurance during one of the deadliest pandemics in modern history.

  • Ambulances seen outside NYU Langone Hospital's Emergency entrance during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in New York City, March 31, 2020, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    Students: Promising Strategies for Creating Critical Care Capacity in U.S. Hospitals

    Apr 3, 2020

    Hospitals can prepare for a surge of patients critically ill with COVID-19, but it will require hospital leaders, practitioners, and regional officials to adopt drastic measures that challenge the standard way of providing care. Students Karishma Patel (cohort '17) and Hamad Al Ibrahim ('18) worked with RAND colleagues to develop a tool to help estimate current capacity and explore ways to increase it.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un observes the firing of suspected missiles in this image released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on March 22, 2020, photo by KCNA/Reuters

    Alum and Student: North Korea Is Denying COVID-19

    Apr 2, 2020

    According to North Korean authorities, North Korea has not yet suffered any cases of COVID-19. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) and student Diana Myers ('19) say that is very surprising, given that North Korea is a neighbor and extensive trading partner of China, where the disease initially flourished. There are signs that the absence of COVID-19 cases in North Korea is yet another North Korean deception.

  • A girl doing schoolwork on a laptop computer, photo by ijeab/Getty Images

    Prof: For Instruction, Online Doesn't Have to Mean Impersonal

    Apr 2, 2020

    Children's needs extend beyond the purely academic, write Prof. Elizabeth Steiner and RAND colleagues. It is important that their social and emotional well-being is supported as instruction moves online during the COVID-19 pandemic. A whole-child view of what students need could benefit them now more than ever.

  • Group of people with their hands on top of one another, photo by PeopleImages/Getty Images

    Student Helps Evaluate the WhyWeRise Mental Health Campaign

    Apr 1, 2020

    Rebecca de Guttry (cohort '18) conducted interviews and analyzed a survey to evaluate WhyWeRise, a community engagement mental health campaign. The research indicates that the campaign reached at least 30 percent of Los Angeles County youth and mobilized them to improve social support for those experiencing mental health challenges.

  • An empty market after a curfew was imposed to halt the spread of COVID-19 in the holy city of Najaf, Iraq, March 18, 2020

    Prof Considers Economic Consequences of COVID-19 in the Middle East, Implications for U.S. National Security

    Apr 1, 2020

    The global COVID-19 pandemic will have a dramatic impact on economies across the globe, but the Middle East may be particularly affected given the simultaneous fall in oil prices, writes Prof. Howard Shatz. The economic consequences of this pandemic are also likely to affect U.S. interests in the region.

  • A worker checks part of a delivery of hospital beds to The Mount Sinai Hospital during the COVID-19 outbreak, New York City, March 31, 2020, photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters

    Prof: Implement Critical Care Surge Strategies Now to Save Lives

    Apr 1, 2020

    As COVID-19 continues to spread, hospitals are bracing for a surge of patients requiring critical care. To meet the demand, Prof. Christopher Nelson says U.S. health care facilities may need to fundamentally change the way they allocate space, staff, and equipment.