Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • People are seen at a 24-hour COVID-19 vaccination center at the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Brooklyn, New York, January 11, 2021, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    Vaccine Hesitancy Is High Among Black Americans, Including Health Care Workers

    Mar 1, 2021

    Lower vaccination rates among Black Americans would further widen COVID-19 inequities in diagnosis, hospitalization, and mortality. But research by Priya Gandhi (cohort '20) and colleagues finds that concerns about vaccine safety, mistrust of the government's transparency around COVID-19, and beliefs about racism in health care are contributing to mistrust of the vaccine.

  • Figure looks down on another figure from a higher stack of blocks, photo by francescoch/Getty Images

    Shared Prosperity: The Crying Need for Inclusive Globalization

    Feb 23, 2021

    The disaffection of a wide swath of the American population has been linked to the political polarization of the country, as well as its divisive tendencies, writes Prof. Krishna Kumar. While globalization is not the only reason for this disaffection, it is an apt lens through which to view the revolt against elitism, expertise, and changing demographics.

  • A Kindergarten teacher cleans and prepares her classroom, from where she will begin the new school year teaching virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic, in Boston, Massachusetts, September 18, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Stress Topped the Reasons Why Public School Teachers Quit, Even Before COVID-19

    Feb 22, 2021

    When asked why they left the profession, former teachers cited stress twice as often as insufficient pay, according to research by student Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19). Most former teachers took jobs with less or equal pay, and 3 in 10 without health insurance or retirement benefits.

  • The emergency room entrance at Essentia Health, a 133-bed hospital in Fargo, North Dakota, October 25, 2020, photo by Bing Guan/Reuters

    Setting U.S. Hospital Prices Could Cut Overall Health Spending by Billions

    Feb 18, 2021

    Price regulations face political obstacles and have been strongly opposed by medical providers. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Nabeel Qureshi ('18) find that setting prices for all commercial health care payers could reduce hospital spending by $61.9 billion to $236.6 billion a year if the rates were set at 100 to 150 percent of the amounts paid by Medicare.

  • Doctor talking to a woman with a young girl in her lap, photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

    Primary Care Productivity

    Feb 17, 2021

    To advance understanding of primary care clinic productivity, Annie Brothers (cohort '18) and her coauthors reviewed relevant literature and convened a diverse set of stakeholders to explore definitions of productivity, input, and output in primary care; identify relevant tools; and establish consensus on key aspects of primary care productivity.

  • Female mechanic standing under a car in a garage

    “Build Back Better” Requires Going Beyond Hard Infrastructure

    Feb 16, 2021

    The COVID-19 crisis appears to reveal a number of vulnerabilities in the vital “soft” components of America’s infrastructure such as adaptive planning, skills training and access equality, writes student Keren Zhu (cohort '17) in the American Society for Public Administration's PATimes.

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    School Helps Lead Local Government-to-University Initiative

    Feb 11, 2021

    Pardee RAND is proud to celebrate its first anniversary as a local leader in the Volcker Alliance's Government-to-University (G2U) Initiative, partnering with the Southern California Association of Governments to grow the public sector talent pipeline

  • Intricate real life-like models in a wargame at Marine Corps Base Quantico in Quantico, Virginia, August 23, 2017, photo by Frances Seybold/U.S. Marine Corps

    Wargames as an Educational Tool

    Feb 8, 2021

    The benefits of games for military education are well documented, writes alum Ellie Bartels (cohort '15). But harnessing the potential of games to foster innovation may require a commitment to sustain gaming over the years needed to explore a problem space and develop and stress-test new ideas.

  • Business owner in a mask posting a closed sign on the door, photo by RichLegg/Getty Images

    Comparing National and International Approaches to COVID-19 Measures

    Jan 29, 2021

    To track how well different countries and U.S. states are responding to the pandemic—and to make valid cross-country and cross-state comparisons of key outcomes—uniform measures are needed. Hamad Al-Ibrahim (cohort '18), Joan Chang ('18), and RAND colleagues evaluated the comparability of commonly used COVID-19-related measures and make recommendations for the use and development of measures that would allow for more standardized and valid comparisons.

  • Bottles of drugs on the shelf at the Rock Canyon Pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, May 9, 2019, photo by George Frey/Reuters

    U.S. Prescription Drug Prices Are 2.56 Times Those in Other Countries

    Jan 28, 2021

    Prices for prescription drugs in the United States in 2018 were 256 percent of those in 32 comparison countries, according to research by Alejandro Becerra-Ornelas (cohort '17) and Mahlet Tebeka ('17). For brand-name drugs, U.S. prices were 344 percent higher. But for generic drugs, they were only 84 percent of the average paid in other nations.

  • Tongass National Forest, Alaska, <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tongass_National_Forest_17.jpg">photo</a> by <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Gillfoto">gillfoto</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>

    Local Communities Need a Voice in How to 'Build Back Better'

    Jan 12, 2021

    Long before it was popularized and made its way into political slogans and economic recovery battle cries, the phrase “building back better” was a central tenet of disaster recovery and community resilience. Max Izenberg (cohort '18) asks, how should community voices be incorporated into “building back better” processes?

  • A woman stands on a ruined building after Hurricane Eta, in Wawa Bar, a Miskito indigenous community in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, November 23, 2020, photo by Katlyn Holland/CRS /Latin America News Agency/Reuters

    Previous Disasters Provide Important Lessons for Central America's Recovery from Hurricanes

    Jan 11, 2021

    As the global community works together to assist Central America in recovering from the disastrous 2020 hurricane season, alum David Groves (cohort '01) and colleagues write, experiences from other recent disaster recovery efforts offer some helpful lessons both for the governments of the region as well as outsiders providing resources and support.

  • U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptors from 94th Fighter Squadron landed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Aug. 10, 2017, photo by Staff Sgt. Carlin O. Leslie/U.S. Air Force

    Bad Idea: Overly Focusing on Development and Acquisition Speed

    Dec 16, 2020

    The Pentagon has in recent years turned its attention to the need for speed in weapons system development and acquisition. Alum Jon Wong (cohort '12) writes that, while shortening the timeline for program development and fielding is important for Defense Department acquisition leaders, overly prioritizing speed can lead to issues with program management, sustainment, and other areas.

  • A student using her laptop at home, photo by damircudic/Getty Images

    Despite Its Challenges, Remote Learning Is Here to Stay

    Dec 15, 2020

    School district leaders are concerned about students' unequal opportunities to learn during the pandemic, students' social and emotional learning needs, and insufficient funding to cover staff, according to Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) and her coauthors. Still, about two in ten leaders still anticipate that a fully remote learning option will become a permanent public school offering.

  • A teenage girl looks through a fenced barrier in front of the White House, photo by EyeJoy/Getty Images

    Preparing Children for Civic Life in the Era of Truth Decay

    Dec 8, 2020

    To restore the role of facts in public life, it's important for America's youth to develop strong civic skills. Lynn Hu (cohort '19) and colleagues find that students can build these skills in the classroom, but teachers need better resources and more support to help them do it.

  • Student Ellie Bartels guides members of the Board of Governors in a strategic game

    For These Alumnae, Games Are Hard Work

    Dec 1, 2020

    Games are more than just theoretical to alumnae Ellie Bartels (cohort '15), Claire O'Hanlon ('13), and Yuna Wong ('00). Bartels is the new director of the RAND Center for Gaming, O'Hanlon recently launched an online version of her card game ControVersus, and Wong helped create RAND's first publicly available board game, Hedgemony.

  • The hydroelectric dam Cachi in Ujarras de Cartago, 60 miles of San Jose, Costa Rica, May 25, 2007, photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

    The Benefits and Costs of Decarbonizing Costa Rica's Economy

    Nov 24, 2020

    Costa Rica set the ambitious goal of becoming carbon-neutral by 2050. Alumni David Groves and Edmundo Molina-Perez, with students James Syme and Carlos Calvo Hernandez, evaluated the benefits and costs of its National Decarbonization Plan and found that under most plausible assumptions about the future, the plan would achieve or nearly achieve its goals and do so at a net economic benefit.

  • Joel Martinez takes a photo of Washington Gardens Apartments, which collapsed from winds brought by Hurricane Zeta in New Orleans, Louisiana, October 28, 2020, photo by Kathleen Flynn/Reuters

    Disaster Reporting and Its Impacts on Policy and Inequities

    Nov 16, 2020

    Disaster news tropes may capture audiences' attention to news sites, feeds, and networks, but they ultimately frustrate progress in mitigating the short-term and long-term effects of disasters on communities. Faculty Leaders Program alum Shearon Roberts argues that it's more important than ever that news stories about disasters in the time of a pandemic frame the impacts of environmental phenomena in meaningful ways.

  • Teachers work outside their school building for safety reasons as they prepare for the delayed start of the school year due to COVID-19, in Brooklyn, New York City, September 14, 2020, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    This School Year Could Be Another Casualty of the Pandemic

    Nov 16, 2020

    Most U.S. schools are providing either fully remote or hybrid instruction as the pandemic continues to limit students' learning. Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) finds that students are less prepared for grade-level work and those from vulnerable populations are most at risk of falling behind. Some 80 percent of teachers report burnout.

  • A firefighter works on the Blue Ridge Fire burning in Yorba Linda, California, October 26, 2020, photo by Ringo Chiu/Reuters

    Another Record-Breaking Fire Season Shows the Need for a Comprehensive Strategy

    Nov 6, 2020

    Year after year, fires across western U.S. states scorch forests, rangeland, and neighborhoods, wreaking havoc on rural economies and pushing smoke into cities. Jay Balagna (cohort '20), a former wildland firefighter, suggests that policymakers consider a coordinated and comprehensive effort that brings together the best minds in government, communities, and academia.