Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • A child receives polio vaccination during an anti-polio campaign on the outskirts of Jalalabad, Afghanistan

    An Outbreak of Outbreaks

    Jun 11, 2014

    Lately, stories about outbreaks seem to be spreading faster than the diseases themselves, writes Professor Melinda Moore. An outbreak of measles in Ohio is just part of an 18-year high of U.S. cases. Meanwhile, polio continues to circulate in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nigeria, while spreading to other countries.

  • Woman attends a health education session in northern Nigeria

    Insurance and Incentives: A Dual Approach to Try to Improve Maternal Health in Nigeria

    Jun 10, 2014

    Less than 5% of Nigerians have insurance; two-thirds of all health care costs are paid out of pocket. When people must pay out of pocket for health care at the point of service, writes Pardee RAND student Yemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) in The RAND Blog, this restricts access, excludes the poorest and most vulnerable, and leads to delays in patients seeking help.

  • The United Nations headquarters building is pictured in Vienna where six world powers and Iran launched the decisive phase of diplomacy over Tehran's nuclear work on May 14, 2014

    Israeli, Saudi, and Iranian Responses in the Days After a Deal With Iran: What Are the U.S. Options?

    Jun 4, 2014

    In this June 2014 Congressional Briefing, Professor Lynn Davis moderated as a panel of Middle East experts discussed concerns about Iran of two key U.S. partners; the internal dynamics and motivations of the Iranian government; and U.S. policy options to craft a sustainable nuclear agreement with Iran.

  • Protests in Malaga, Spain against the government's spending cuts and failure to revive the moribund economy

    The European Democracy Paradox

    May 21, 2014

    While social media and other tools have enhanced opportunities to participate in the political process, these new drivers do not seem to translate easily into offline political participation, writes Pardee RAND student Marlon Graf (cohort '12) in The RAND Blog.

  • Double maize yields for Malawian farmer with conservation agriculture

    Climate Change, Uncertainty Cast Clouds on Malawi's Food Policies

    May 20, 2014

    Malawi has the highest per capita maize consumption in Africa, but it may need to consider alternatives, taking into greater consideration weather, climate change and water needs, writes Pardee RAND student Tobi Oluwatola (cohort '12) for the Pardee Global Human Progress Initiative.

  • Benjamin Lesczynski, 8, of New York, takes a sip of a "Big Gulp" while protesting the proposed "soda ban" suggested by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, July 9, 2012

    Let's Regulate Food Like We Do Alcohol

    May 19, 2014

    To help people avoid overeating, Professor Deborah Cohen says the kinds of policies effective in controlling alcohol consumption should be applied to food—standardizing portion sizes, limiting impulse marketing and reducing the convenience and salience of foods most closely associated with obesity and chronic diseases.

  • A computer-generated image of objects in Earth orbit that are currently being tracked, 95% of which is orbital debris

    Debris Poses Increased Threat to Exploration

    May 16, 2014

    Every satellite launch and maneuver is carefully coordinated because some orbits are strewn with the space-based equivalent of blown tires, abandoned vehicles, loose gravel and, of course, other traffic. Earth's orbit is littered with hundreds of thousands of debris objects, write Professors Bill Welser and Dave Baiocchi.

  • Media Call on Armed Aerial Drones and U.S. Security

    May 16, 2014

    Professor Lynn Davis, director of RAND's Washington office and senior political scientist, hosted a news media conference call to discuss armed aerial drones and U.S. security. Davis discussed issues such as how dangerous proliferation of drones may be, whether drones are transformative weapons, and how the U.S. can help shape a set of international norms that could discourage misuse by others.

  • 415 Superscooper aircraft

    Fighting Fires From Above

    May 15, 2014

    A newly deployed airborne firefighting resource is helping the United States Forest Service (USFS) battle wildfires, while at the same time providing valuable lessons on the utility and cost effectiveness of water-dropping scooper aircraft, writes Professor Edward Keating.

  • a worried-looking woman paying for her prescription at a pharmacy

    What Drives the Market for Orphan Drugs?

    May 14, 2014

    The 1983 Orphan Drug Act appears to be successful in promoting development of new treatments for relatively rare conditions. But an unintended consequence of its success is the high cost of specialty drugs, writes Pardee RAND professor Susan Gates.

  • Photo of South African shanty town

    In South Africa, Hard Choices on Housing

    May 7, 2014

    South Africans go to the polls today, marking 20 years since apartheid ended and the country's first democratic elections brought the African National Congress (ANC) to power. But while much has changed, writes Pardee RAND student Julia Pollak (cohort '12), many challenges remain, including the developing nation's dire need for housing.

  • Hindu saints stand in line to cast their votes at a polling station in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad April 30, 2014

    India Votes — and What It Might Mean for the United States

    May 5, 2014

    If elected, Modi could turn out to be the politician that India's Congress accuses him of being, focusing on an internal agenda that discourages foreign engagement. Professor Rafiq Dossani says the U.S. would no doubt prefer that he follow the economic course he charted in Gujarat.

  • homeless man against the wall

    Book Review: America's Poor and the Great Recession

    May 2, 2014

    While U.S. absolute poverty has increased sharply since the start of the Great Recession, it was, despite historic ups and downs, at roughly the same level in 2007 as in 1980. Until the day comes when grand poverty bargains can be struck, Pardee RAND student Eric Apaydin (cohort '11) says this book, by a former Pardee RAND dean, has much to say in current policy debates.

  • Nate Johnson, managing owner of the Queen Anne Cannabis Club in Seattle, Washington

    Legalising Cannabis Is More Than Just a Yes or No Decision

    May 2, 2014

    Any truly honest discussion about how to regulate cannabis markets must start with clear objectives and goals, write Professors Beau Kilmer and Rosalie Pacula. How these markets are opened can be as important as the decision to legalize cannabis.

  • medical researchers examining a test tube of liquid

    10 Ways Innovation Could Help Cure the U.S. Health Spending Problem

    Apr 29, 2014

    Many studies grapple with how to control spending by considering changing how existing technologies are used. But, Professor Steven Garber asks, what if the problem could be attacked at its root by changing which drugs and devices are invented in the first place?

  • The Days After a Deal: Iran, Its Neighbors, and U.S. Policy Following a Nuclear Agreement

    Apr 17, 2014

    Professor Lynn Davis participated in a half-day RAND conference addressing "The Days After a Deal: Iran, its Neighbors, and U.S. Policy Following a Nuclear Agreement." As nuclear negotiations with Iran approach a deadline for a final deal this summer, the RAND conference looked ahead at some of the critical "day after" questions following a potential nuclear agreement.

  • African mother and baby

    Maternal Deaths: Turning the Tide in a Nigerian State

    Apr 16, 2014

    Bold and innovative approaches are being developed in different parts of the African continent in the quest to reduce maternal mortality, writes Pardee RAND student Yemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) in this inaugural blog for the Pardee Global Human Progress Initiative. A noteworthy example of these innovative approaches is the Abiye Safe Motherhood program in Ondo State, Nigeria.

  • a man holding a book on his lap

    Sending Prisoners to College Will Save You Money

    Apr 11, 2014

    Correctional education works for states because it saves money and shrinks prison populations, write Professors Lois Davis and Jennifer Steele. It works for prisoners, the public, law enforcement, and the judicial system because educated prisoners are less likely to return to their criminal ways once released.

  • girl student holding a microtube

    Instead of Promoting STEM Education Indiscriminately, Try This

    Mar 31, 2014

    With all the evidence demonstrating the importance of STEM education for success in the 21st century, well-intentioned policymakers may be tempted to indiscriminately promote all STEM curricula, across all levels of education, writes Pardee RAND professor Rafiq Dossani. But unpacking what STEM really means reveals the need for a more nuanced approach.

  • mother, daughter, granddaughter

    Assessing and Addressing Women's Health and Health Care

    Mar 28, 2014

    Women make up a majority of the U.S. population. Yet research policies and practices often treat women's health and health care as special topics or minority issues, writes Professor Chloe Bird. The resulting knowledge gaps hamstring efforts to improve women's health care and outcomes even for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death among women.

  • family dining on a restaurant patio

    Restaurant Standards Could Curb Fat America

    Mar 26, 2014

    Given the high prevalence of obesity and chronic diseases and their enormous societal burden, every restaurant, including fast food outlets, should offer healthier meal options and discourage over-consumption, writes Professor Deborah Cohen.

  • a large BLT sandwich in a restaurant

    Obesity Epidemic: Standardized Portion Sizes in Restaurants Could Help Solve Public Health Crisis

    Mar 22, 2014

    Ideally, restaurant food should be tailored and sold the way clothing is, so people can get the exact amount that is appropriate for their bodies. Professor Deborah Cohen says such sizing options should be required in all dining establishments to give people the option of consuming meals that fit.

  • Indian students study inside the Delhi University campus in New Delhi September 20, 2013

    Four Issues That RUSA's Plans for Research Universities Ought To Address

    Mar 18, 2014

    The Rashtriya Uchchatar Shiksha Abhiyan, or National Higher Education Mission, is the key implementing initiative of the Indian government's 12th Five Year Plan for higher education. Professor Rafiq Dossani says it promotes three policy priorities in higher education: equity, expansion, and excellence.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced to speak by Christian Champagne from Chicago at the unveiling of Obama's "My Brother's Keeper" initiative

    Realizing the Potential of 'My Brother's Keeper'

    Mar 16, 2014

    The White House has mobilized an impressive coalition to address a critical national challenge, and used the power of research evidence to begin to structure the initiative. Professors Rebecca Kilburn and Lois Davis write that by drawing more lessons from research, the initiative can further bolster its chance to build strong and lasting ladders of opportunity and success for boys and young men of color.

  • doctor reviewing a patient's chart with her on a tablet

    Physicians' Concerns About Electronic Health Records: Implications and Steps Towards Solutions

    Mar 11, 2014

    If practicing physicians are correct, the current state of EHR technology has introduced several impediments to providing patient care, undermining physician professional satisfaction. Professor Mark Friedberg notes, many of these problems also should be of great concern to patients.