Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • homeless man against the wall

    Book Review: America's Poor and the Great Recession

    May 2, 2014

    While U.S. absolute poverty has increased sharply since the start of the Great Recession, it was, despite historic ups and downs, at roughly the same level in 2007 as in 1980. Until the day comes when grand poverty bargains can be struck, Pardee RAND student Eric Apaydin (cohort '11) says this book, by a former Pardee RAND dean, has much to say in current policy debates.

  • Nate Johnson, managing owner of the Queen Anne Cannabis Club in Seattle, Washington

    Legalising Cannabis Is More Than Just a Yes or No Decision

    May 2, 2014

    Any truly honest discussion about how to regulate cannabis markets must start with clear objectives and goals, write Professors Beau Kilmer and Rosalie Pacula. How these markets are opened can be as important as the decision to legalize cannabis.

  • medical researchers examining a test tube of liquid

    10 Ways Innovation Could Help Cure the U.S. Health Spending Problem

    Apr 29, 2014

    Many studies grapple with how to control spending by considering changing how existing technologies are used. But, Professor Steven Garber asks, what if the problem could be attacked at its root by changing which drugs and devices are invented in the first place?

  • The Days After a Deal: Iran, Its Neighbors, and U.S. Policy Following a Nuclear Agreement

    Apr 17, 2014

    Professor Lynn Davis participated in a half-day RAND conference addressing "The Days After a Deal: Iran, its Neighbors, and U.S. Policy Following a Nuclear Agreement." As nuclear negotiations with Iran approach a deadline for a final deal this summer, the RAND conference looked ahead at some of the critical "day after" questions following a potential nuclear agreement.

  • African mother and baby

    Maternal Deaths: Turning the Tide in a Nigerian State

    Apr 16, 2014

    Bold and innovative approaches are being developed in different parts of the African continent in the quest to reduce maternal mortality, writes Pardee RAND student Yemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) in this inaugural blog for the Pardee Global Human Progress Initiative. A noteworthy example of these innovative approaches is the Abiye Safe Motherhood program in Ondo State, Nigeria.

  • a man holding a book on his lap

    Sending Prisoners to College Will Save You Money

    Apr 11, 2014

    Correctional education works for states because it saves money and shrinks prison populations, write Professors Lois Davis and Jennifer Steele. It works for prisoners, the public, law enforcement, and the judicial system because educated prisoners are less likely to return to their criminal ways once released.

  • High and Dry? From the Rockies to the Sierra, Water Managers Gauge Implications of Climate Change

    Apr 1, 2014

    Case studies by Pardee RAND alumni/faculty David Groves (cohort '01) and Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04), and student Evan Bloom (cohort '09), looking at the Colorado River Basin and the Sierra Nevada, show how water managers can factor climate change — and the uncertainty surrounding it — into their long-term plans.

  • girl student holding a microtube

    Instead of Promoting STEM Education Indiscriminately, Try This

    Mar 31, 2014

    With all the evidence demonstrating the importance of STEM education for success in the 21st century, well-intentioned policymakers may be tempted to indiscriminately promote all STEM curricula, across all levels of education, writes Pardee RAND professor Rafiq Dossani. But unpacking what STEM really means reveals the need for a more nuanced approach.

  • mother, daughter, granddaughter

    Assessing and Addressing Women's Health and Health Care

    Mar 28, 2014

    Women make up a majority of the U.S. population. Yet research policies and practices often treat women's health and health care as special topics or minority issues, writes Professor Chloe Bird. The resulting knowledge gaps hamstring efforts to improve women's health care and outcomes even for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death among women.

  • family dining on a restaurant patio

    Restaurant Standards Could Curb Fat America

    Mar 26, 2014

    Given the high prevalence of obesity and chronic diseases and their enormous societal burden, every restaurant, including fast food outlets, should offer healthier meal options and discourage over-consumption, writes Professor Deborah Cohen.

  • a large BLT sandwich in a restaurant

    Obesity Epidemic: Standardized Portion Sizes in Restaurants Could Help Solve Public Health Crisis

    Mar 22, 2014

    Ideally, restaurant food should be tailored and sold the way clothing is, so people can get the exact amount that is appropriate for their bodies. Professor Deborah Cohen says such sizing options should be required in all dining establishments to give people the option of consuming meals that fit.

  • Indian students study inside the Delhi University campus in New Delhi September 20, 2013

    Four Issues That RUSA's Plans for Research Universities Ought To Address

    Mar 18, 2014

    The Rashtriya Uchchatar Shiksha Abhiyan, or National Higher Education Mission, is the key implementing initiative of the Indian government's 12th Five Year Plan for higher education. Professor Rafiq Dossani says it promotes three policy priorities in higher education: equity, expansion, and excellence.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced to speak by Christian Champagne from Chicago at the unveiling of Obama's "My Brother's Keeper" initiative

    Realizing the Potential of 'My Brother's Keeper'

    Mar 16, 2014

    The White House has mobilized an impressive coalition to address a critical national challenge, and used the power of research evidence to begin to structure the initiative. Professors Rebecca Kilburn and Lois Davis write that by drawing more lessons from research, the initiative can further bolster its chance to build strong and lasting ladders of opportunity and success for boys and young men of color.

  • doctor reviewing a patient's chart with her on a tablet

    Physicians' Concerns About Electronic Health Records: Implications and Steps Towards Solutions

    Mar 11, 2014

    If practicing physicians are correct, the current state of EHR technology has introduced several impediments to providing patient care, undermining physician professional satisfaction. Professor Mark Friedberg notes, many of these problems also should be of great concern to patients.

  • A medical history form asking about alcohol and drug use

    Hard Drugs Demand Solid Understanding

    Mar 8, 2014

    Due to budget concerns the federal government just shut down a critical data source that provides insights into abuse, dependence on, and spending on heroin and other hard drugs like crack and methamphetamine, writes Professor Beau Kilmer. How can we make sensible decisions about treatment funding without knowing how many people are suffering from dependence on drugs and whether the number is rising or falling?

  • IT training for kids who live in the surrounding farm areas of Stutterheim outside East London in the Eastern Cape

    IDSS Speaker Discusses "Rebooting Africa"

    Mar 7, 2014

    The International Development Speaker Series welcomed Harvard's Calestous Juma, who discussed strategies for enabling Africa to harness the power of platform technologies for the technological catch-up and leapfrogging needed to spur economic development and prosperity.

  • woman getting her blood pressure checked by a doctor in a bright room

    Caring for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes, Why Gender Matters

    Feb 27, 2014

    High-quality routine care for both cardiovascular disease and diabetes is at least as relevant to women's health and survival as it is to men's. Yet evidence suggests that women continue to face gaps in even low-cost, routine aspects of care, writes Professor Chloe Bird.

  • two male students looking at a laptop

    What to Make of P-TECH Schools

    Feb 21, 2014

    There is no doubting the viability of STEM skills in the 21st century job market and the long-term benefits of going to college. But Professor Rafiq Dossani says the P-TECH (Pathways in Technology Early College High School) program could be promising for two reasons that have nothing to do with technology.

  • man stretching at his desk

    Quick Takes: Do Workplace Wellness Programs Make Business Sense?

    Feb 20, 2014

    The press and trade publications strongly endorse workplace wellness programs as a good investment for employers. Soeren Mattke, a physician and Pardee RAND professor, explains why his work tells a different story.

  • Women participate in a nutrition class at the Los Angeles County women's jail

    Correctional Education: How Effective Is It and What Can We Do to Make It Better?

    Feb 18, 2014

    In this February 2014 Congressional Briefing, Professor Lois M. Davis shares results from her RAND study on correctional education, conducted for the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice and funded under the Second Chance Act of 2007.

  • instructor holding a tablet with students

    How to Assess 21st Century Competencies: 12 Key Lessons

    Feb 15, 2014

    Assessing competencies such as creativity and global awareness can provide educators with a broader set of indicators they can use to inform instruction and set goals with students. However, evidence about the effects of testing suggests that caution and careful planning is warranted when developing a new assessment system, write Professors Brian Stecher and Laura Hamilton.

  • colorful arrows

    Pardee RAND Researchers Develop Framework for Change Through Accountability

    Feb 12, 2014

    To prioritize the goals, actions, and initiatives in the Department of Defense Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan, 2012–2017, Pardee RAND student Abigail Haddad (cohort '09), alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), and professor Nelson Lim developed a "Framework for Change Through Accountability."

  • March to support the Fair Food Program

    Wal-Mart Chooses Fairness, Giving Farmworkers a Boost

    Feb 6, 2014

    The recent commitment by Wal-Mart Stores to the Fair Food Program is a transformational moment in the decades-long struggle for fair treatment of agricultural workers in America but the decision is hardly the last human-rights battle to be won on behalf of this long-oppressed work force, writes Pardee RAND dean Susan Marquis.

  • Graffiti arrows on wall

    Analyzing Global Societal Trends and their Impact on the EU

    Feb 4, 2014

    Pardee RAND student Marlon Graf (cohort '12), alum Jeremy Ghez (cohort '06) and colleagues in RAND Europe suggest that the EU needs to invest in citizens, prepare for a new growth paradigm, and reinvent government to ensure that Europe is resilient in the face of global societal trends in the next two decades.

  • pie chart illustration over a world map

    Happy 80th Birthday, 'GDP' — Is It Not Time to Retire?

    Feb 1, 2014

    While there are merits to using GDP, it is clear that it fails to measure several important potential externalities to economic growth, such as environmental damage, poor working conditions, or violations of privacy rights, writes Professor Stijn Hoorens.