Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Toward a Renewed Middle East Peace Process

    May 11, 2017

    Momentum is building toward resumption of the dormant Middle East peace process. But alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) says there will need to be a clear, consistent plan that delivers quick, tangible results to both sides and helps restore trust between them in order for a peace plan to succeed.

  • A New Ugandan Cuisine: Showcasing Superfood Qualities of Millet and Sorghum

    May 9, 2017

    The results of a series of cooking contests in Uganda to promote the use of drought-tolerant, nutritious traditional grains—millet and sorghum—signal that a new food trend may be on the horizon. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and professor Deborah Cohen describe their Pardee Initiative "Superfoods" project in this first of three blog posts.

  • Strategic Planning Tools for the Army Senior ROTC Program

    May 5, 2017

    Researchers created a program evaluation tool and a selection evaluation tool to help the Army evaluate existing ROTC programs and explore new market opportunities, keep up with changes in the college student population, and meet both near-term officer production goals as well as longer-term strategic objectives.

  • Impact on the Environment from President Trump's First 100 Days

    May 4, 2017

    President Trump's actions have not yet resulted in demonstrable change in environmental conditions or funding, but the groundwork is being laid for unwinding major regulations and diminishing staff within the EPA and other federal agencies with climate-related research in their portfolios, says professor Debra Knopman.

  • Prototype Tool Designed to Help Law Enforcement Use Data from Mobile Applications

    May 1, 2017

    Student Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) worked with alumni Anne Boustead ('11) and Steven Isley ('10) and professor Ed Balkovich to document a prototype tool called MIKE (the Mobile Information and Knowledge Ecosystem) that can help interested stakeholders — law enforcement, commercial enterprises, regulators, legislators, and the public (including advocacy groups) — better understand the mobile app ecosystem and the relationships among the data, its sources, and applicable legal constraints.

  • U.S.-China Tensions Are Unlikely to Lead to War

    May 1, 2017

    The U.S.-China relationship today may be trending towards greater tension, but the relative stability and overall low level of hostility make the prospect of an accidental escalation to war extremely unlikely, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Alum Yong-Sup Han Visits to Discuss North Korea

    May 1, 2017

    Alum Yong-Sup Han (cohort '88), vice president of the Research Institute on National Security Affairs at Korea National Defense University, visited RAND to discuss the U.S. defense policy toward North Korea. He was invited by the RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy.

  • Mixed Messages: Is Cocaine Consumption in the U.S. Going Up or Down?

    Apr 28, 2017

    Data lags and the elimination of the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program complicate estimates of U.S. cocaine consumption. New users who haven't yet developed cocaine dependence are also a factor. Professor Beau Kilmer and alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) suggest it may be prudent to start planning for an increase in heavy use even before all of the evidence is in.

  • Lessons from Northern Uganda: Post-Conflict Integration of 'Children Born of War'

    Apr 12, 2017

    Children conceived as a result of sexual violence during armed conflict face socioeconomic marginalization, family rejection, stigmatization, and violence. Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) examines ways societies can address the unique needs of the thousands of "children born of war."

  • Rocky Road Ahead Likely for U.S.-China Relations

    Apr 11, 2017

    The first summit with President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping downplayed contentious issues like Taiwan and the South China Sea. But the differences run deep, writes professor Timothy Heath, and frustration is palpable on both sides. Moreover, the competition for international leadership continues.

  • Five Dead-Ends — and One Risky Opportunity — When Trump and Xi Talk North Korea

    Apr 10, 2017

    Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) writes that, among President Trump's options, proposing a deal that gives the North Korean elite an alternative to its murderous and unstable leader could be the safest and most realistic way to sheath North Korean nuclear weapons and safeguard the American people.

  • How California Is Trying to Keep Autonomous Vehicle Development on Track

    Apr 10, 2017

    California's Department of Motor Vehicles recently proposed new regulations governing the testing and deployment of autonomous vehicles. Professor Nidhi Kalra asks, will this help retain the state's status as a testing and deployment ground for the technology, and will it make California safer?

  • Regional APPAM Conference in April to Feature a Record 18 Students

    Apr 10, 2017

    At APPAM's 2017 California Regional Student Conference, 18 Pardee RAND students will present their research across a wide variety of policy areas.

  • RAND Annual Report Features 'The Pardee RAND Advantage'

    Apr 4, 2017

    The 2016 RAND Annual Report includes 10 pages about Pardee RAND students, research, innovation, courses, and more. Featured student projects include the Food-Energy-Water Index, investing in traffic safety, women in the Marine Corps infantry, virtual currency, and identifying disease hot-spots.

  • Alum Vilamovska Receives Award for Service to Poland

    Apr 3, 2017

    Anna-Marie Vilamovska (cohort '05) is one of the youngest recipients of Poland's Commander Cross of the Order of Merit, which was bestowed upon her in December for her contributions to the development of Polish-Bulgarian cooperation.

  • Just Right: Combatting Childhood Obesity Through Portion Size

    Mar 27, 2017

    Single-serving guidelines can help kids avoid eating too much when eating out. Student Cameron Wright (cohort '12) and professor Deborah Cohen created this infographic summarizing right-sized portions for kids.

  • Strategic Consequences of U.S. Withdrawal from TPP

    Mar 27, 2017

    America's withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership has exacerbated doubts about U.S. international leadership and America's role in Asia. Professor Timothy Heath says future trade agreements could face similar fates until they do a better job outlining how domestic workers can prosper.

  • Murder, Missiles, and Messages from North Korea

    Mar 24, 2017

    Pyongyang launched a ballistic missile on February 12 — one day before Kim Jong Nam, half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, was murdered in Malaysia — and four more on March 6. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) asks, What would lead North Korea to carry out these provocations?

  • Wages, Employment, and STEM Education in Appalachia

    Mar 22, 2017

    Student Nicholas Broten (cohort '15) coauthored an ongoing assessment of employment and wages in energy and advanced manufacturing industries in the Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia region. The report captures trends about which counties might have greater demand for educating or employing local talent in STEM careers.

  • Why China Will Not Unify with Taiwan by 2020

    Mar 21, 2017

    The prospects for peaceful unification of China and Taiwan continue to dim. Nothing Beijing has tried to woo or coerce Taiwan has worked. For those determined to compel Taiwan's unification, military subjugation remains a last option. But it would only worsen China's security environment, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Testing the Scenario Hypothesis via an Experimental Comparison

    Mar 16, 2017

    Alumni Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) and Zhimin Mao (cohort '11), along with professor Robert Lempert and other RAND researchers, undertook an experimental comparison of scenarios and forecasts to see which was most useful in a complex decision environment. The results offer lessons for designing decision support tools.

  • Five Myths About American Obesity

    Mar 13, 2017

    Two in three Americans are overweight or obese. There are popular theories about what's causing the obesity epidemic but research does not support them. What is clear, write alum Ruopeng An (cohort '08) and professor Roland Sturm, is that most U.S. adults eat too many calories.

  • On 'Hidden Figures' and Being the Only Woman in the Room

    Mar 12, 2017

    A new film tells the true story of talented women who experienced racial and gender discrimination at NASA in the early 1960s. Like many women, they gained acceptance over time by being great at what they do. Dean Susan Marquis writes that women at RAND have also been pioneers in their fields and are familiar with being the only woman in the room.

  • Winter 2017 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Mar 10, 2017

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about the Charles Wolf memorial, our distinguished visiting professors, a new tech lab and design studio, an upcoming APPAM student conference, and more.

  • Alumni Evaluate the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan

    Mar 9, 2017

    Alumni David Groves (cohort '01) and Zhimin Mao (cohort '11) as well as professors Debra Knopman and Nidhi Kalra, evaluated potential effects of demand and climate uncertainties on investments recently undertaken by the Jinan Municipal Water Resources Bureau according to the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan, and assessed the potential of new investments and management strategies to help Jinan meet its long-term water resources goals.