Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Why Kim Jong Un Fears South Korean Propaganda

    Aug 28, 2015

    While the latest confrontation between North and South Korea appears to be ending peacefully, it provides insight into future North Korean provocations. Words as weapons can work when they are aimed at North Korea's internal politics and backed up by a strong South Korean response supported by the U.S., writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '76).

  • Two Students Receive Inaugural Fellowships from Leonard Schaeffer RAND-USC Initiative

    Aug 24, 2015

    The Leonard Schaeffer RAND-USC Initiative in Health Policy and Economics is pleased to announce that two PhD candidates in policy analysis, Dan Han and Ujwal Kharel, are the recipients of the inaugural fellowships for Pardee RAND Graduate School students.

  • Control Disease in a New York Minute

    Aug 20, 2015

    Legionella bacteria are ubiquitous in many warm-water environments, but outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease like the recent one in the South Bronx don't have to be. Effective public health policies can help inhibit Legionella growth, minimize the occurrence and impact of outbreaks, and save lives, writes Prof. Melinda Moore.

  • Bringing Traditional Grains Back to the African Dinner Table

    Aug 18, 2015

    Although they are more nutritious and well-adapted to Africa's agro-ecological conditions, traditional grains have been losing market share to new grains—especially maize, rice and wheat. A joint initiative of Pardee RAND and the African Centre for Economic Transformation is exploring ways to bring sorghum and millet back to the dinner table.

  • Loose Clicks Sink Ships: When Social Media Meets Military Intelligence

    Aug 14, 2015

    Social media updates can reveal military intelligence. But stopping a soldier from posting a geotagged tweet or Instagram photo presents challenges, writes Prof. Doug Yeung.

  • The Ramifications of Repealing the Individual Mandate

    Aug 13, 2015

    As part of its goal of near-universal coverage, the Affordable Care Act requires most Americans to obtain insurance or pay a penalty. Repealing that requirement would significantly reduce health insurance enrollment and cause individual market premiums to rise.

  • China's Airfield Construction at Fiery Cross Reef in Context: Catch-Up or Coercion?

    Aug 11, 2015

    Even if China really sees itself as undertaking legitimate activities to protect its rightful interests, it is not surprising that its rival claimants, as well as the United States and other countries in the region, see Beijing's island building activities as efforts to improve China's abilities to bully its neighbors.

  • Climate Targets: Values and Uncertainty

    Aug 11, 2015

    Policymakers know that the risks associated with climate change mean they need to cut greenhouse-gas emissions. But uncertainty surrounding the likelihood of different scenarios makes choosing specific policies difficult.

  • Obama Commutes Sentences of 46 Drug Offenders. Now for the Hard Part

    Aug 10, 2015

    Last month, President Obama commuted more sentences in a single day than any president since Lyndon Johnson. But commutation doesn't erase a criminal conviction.

  • Apply Principles of Professional Change Management to Acquisition Reform, or Risk Failure

    Aug 7, 2015

    If Congress enacts substantial changes to acquisition processes as part of the 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, then it has a responsibility to ensure that the DoD has the opportunity and resources to implement proven change management principles to increase the chances for its success.

  • Learning to Stop Worrying and Love the Internet of Things

    Aug 4, 2015

    Late last month, Fiat Chrysler recalled 1.4 million cars to fix a defect that allowed hackers to imperil drivers from afar. In essence, what was considered a huge threat was converted into a solved or at least solvable problem.

  • What Durban Can Teach Detroit: Getting Customers to Pay Their Water Bills

    Jul 29, 2015

    South Africa is proving that governments in poor cities can provide water and collect payment without turning off the water spigot. Detroit and Baltimore might consider exploring models like this that have been successfully tested in even more challenging settings, writes Julia Pollak (cohort '12).

  • Should Undocumented Immigrant Youth Pay In-State Tuition to Attend College?

    Jul 28, 2015

    Undocumented children are entitled to free primary and secondary public education everywhere in the United States, regardless of their legal status. But when they finish high school, their options for college vary depending on the state in which they live, writes Prof. Robert Bozick.

  • Pardee RAND Hosts Third Annual Summer Faculty Workshop in Policy Analysis

    Jul 28, 2015

    The Pardee RAND Graduate School held its third annual Summer Faculty Workshop in Policy Research and Analysis in the Santa Monica office during the week of July 20. The school hosted 12 guest faculty members from institutions serving highly diverse student bodies for an intensive introduction to policy analysis, RAND, and Pardee RAND.

  • Many Homeless Youth Smokers are Motivated to Quit

    Jul 24, 2015

    Approximately 70 percent of unaccompanied homeless youth are current smokers, and their attempts/desire to quit is often considered to be a low priority. However, many are motivated to quit and are interested in smoking cessation products and services, according to research by Leslie Mullins (cohort '12) and Professor Joan Tucker.

  • The Effect of Attending Full-Day Kindergarten on English Learner Students

    Jul 23, 2015

    Research by alum Alison Jacknowitz (cohort '99) and Prof. Jill Cannon published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management finds that English learners in Los Angeles benefitted from full-day kindergarten for reading and retention outcomes.

  • James Rothenberg, Former RAND Trustee, Dies

    Jul 22, 2015

    James F. Rothenberg, chairman of Capital Group Companies, died July 21, 2015. He served on the RAND Board of Trustees from 2005 to 2009, and from 2003 to 2005 on the governing board of the Pardee RAND Graduate School, where he endowed student dissertations and faculty fellowships.

  • Call with the Experts: Vaccines

    Jul 7, 2015

    In the wake of California's mandate that all schoolchildren be vaccinated regardless of religious or personal beliefs, Pardee RAND Prof. Melinda Moore, senior natural scientist at RAND and a public health physician with 20 years experience at the CDC, addresses concerns about vaccines and personal choice versus public safety.

  • Family Planning Must Be Part of the Humanitarian Response in Africa's Conflict Zones

    Jul 1, 2015

    Worldwide, nearly 800 women die every day due to mostly preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. More than half of these deaths occur in fragile states torn by armed conflict and generalized violence, writes student Mahal Woldetsadik (cohort '13).

  • In the Interest of Justice

    Jun 26, 2015

    As the line between criminal justice and national security continues to blur, alum K. Jack Riley (cohort '88) offers three principles that can help young criminology practitioners and scholars.

  • Aging in Asia: Can the 'Tigers' Continue to Roar?

    Jun 16, 2015

    Changing demographics will force Japan and the “Asian Tigers”—Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan—to find ways to remain economically dynamic while increasingly looking after their elderly. Professor Rafiq Dossani and Associate Dean Rachel Swanger ask, how might public policy help accomplish this?

  • Reaching the 80 Percent: Q&A with Krishna Kumar

    Jun 15, 2015

    Pardee RAND professor Krishna Kumar discusses studying agriculture in China, low-income housing in India, and labor markets in Bangladesh, and how research can help the developing world.

  • What Americans Know About King v. Burwell

    Jun 12, 2015

    An upcoming Supreme Court ruling regarding the Affordable Care Act could impact millions of Americans, write professors Katherine Carman and Christine Eibner. Are Americans aware of the court case? And if so, what do they know about it?

  • Physician Waivers to Prescribe Buprenorphine Increase Access to Effective Treatment Options

    Jun 9, 2015

    The increased number and geographic distribution of physicians obtaining waivers to prescribe buprenorphine has widened potential access to effective treatment for those with addiction to heroin or prescription painkillers, according to research by alum Brad Stein (cohort '97) and RAND colleagues.

  • The Costs of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

    Jun 8, 2015

    What are the net costs and benefits to Israelis and Palestinians if the current impasse endures over the next ten years, relative to several alternative trajectories that the conflict could take? Student Shira Efron (cohort '11), alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97), and professors Ross Anthony, Daniel Egel, and Craig Bond contributed to this groundbreaking research.