Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • RAND Celebrates Alum Rick Fallon's Career

    Jan 4, 2017

    Pardee RAND alum Rick Fallon (cohort '75) retired from RAND in January 2017 after two decades of service. As CFO and VP of Finance & Administration, Fallon worked on critical business decisions, performance measures, and initiatives that have increased the agility of RAND's operations.

  • A 155 mm artillery tube enters a heat treatment furnace at Watervliet Arsenal to improve the microstructure and hardness of the steel

    Uncertainty Ahead: Defense Technology and Acquisition Trends in 2017

    Jan 3, 2017

    Prof. Cynthia Cook writes that the change in administration, coupled with the new management structure being imposed by Congress on the Department of Defense's acquisition enterprise, is creating a shifting and unpredictable landscape for 2017.

  • A woman rides a bike past Taiwan and China national flags during a rally held by a group of pro-China supporters calling for peaceful reunification, Taiwan May 14, 2016.

    Walking Away from One-China Policy Imperils Taiwan

    Dec 22, 2016

    The U.S. One-China policy has helped keep the peace for decades. Abandoning it now could result in stiffer Chinese resolve. Such a strategy may even backfire by triggering an otherwise avoidable crisis, writes prof. Michael Chase.

  • The Pentagon, headquarters of the United States Department of Defense, taken from an airplane in January 2008

    Approaching Future Offsets

    Dec 21, 2016

    Grand strategy, acquisitions, and technological considerations may shape the debate about the future of the U.S. military for some time to come. Only where all three elements align are future offsets likely to succeed, writes alum Yuna Huh Wong (cohort '00).

  • Technician working in a control room

    Carrier Deal Does Not Carry the Day for American Workers

    Dec 21, 2016

    Despite the good intentions, pressuring companies like Carrier to keep jobs in the U.S. addresses only the smaller part of the problem, globalization. Professors Krishna Kumar and Lynn Karoly suggest a long-term solution would be to upgrade the education and training system so students graduate with skills for life-long learning.

  • Digital Tablet with stethoscope and brain scan

    Toward a Learning Behavioral Health Care System

    Dec 20, 2016

    New technologies for capturing and sharing data have begun to transform the way providers practice medicine in the United States. Expanding these technologies to behavioral health care could enhance the delivery of services and improve outcomes for millions of Americans, writes alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97).

  • Man looking at chart of China's stock market

    Cracks in the Chinese Powerhouse

    Dec 19, 2016

    Like most countries that have experienced rapid development, China is struggling to transition from a highly successful but unsustainable economic model. Beijing faces the additional challenge of executing difficult reforms in the face of an inhospitable global economy, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Susan, students, alumni, and the Grinch

    Pardee RAND Celebrates Season with Festive Party

    Dec 19, 2016

    Students, alumni, faculty, and staff rang in the 2016 holiday season in true Pardee RAND style on December 8. Students Etienne Rosas (cohort '14) and Claire O'Hanlon (cohort 13), alum Eric Larson (cohort '89) and executive assistant Jennifer Prim provided live musical entertainment for the many attendees.

  • A group of young adults stretching in a dance class

    Insuring Younger Adults Through the ACA's Marketplaces: Options to Expand Enrollment

    Dec 16, 2016

    Whether or not the Affordable Care Act is repealed, having young adults participate in the individual health insurance market remains critical to achieving affordable premiums for everyone, writes Prof. Christine Eibner.

  • Charles Wolf reading in the RAND Library

    Remembering Our Founding Dean, Charles Wolf, Jr.

    Dec 16, 2016

    Charles Wolf, Jr. passed away on October 24, 2016. He was 92. Over his 60 years at RAND, Wolf was a teacher, mentor, and friend to countless students, alumni, staff, and professors. He has left behind a tremendous legacy that is greatly missed.

  • Inmates study during their class at the Taconic Correctional Facility in Bedford Hills, New York, April 8, 2016

    Support for Postsecondary Education in Prison

    Dec 15, 2016

    Correctional educational programs can reduce incarceration costs and recidivism. But it's critical that former inmates can connect with reentry services in the community to complete their education, writes professor Lois Davis.

  • Humanoid robot touching a computer screen

    The Future of Artificial Intelligence

    Dec 14, 2016

    In this Events @ RAND podcast, three Pardee RAND professors discuss the role AI is playing in society, including the incredible promise and pressing concerns.

  • A principal and teachers meeting in the school library

    Improving School Leadership Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

    Dec 13, 2016

    School leadership is acknowledged as a valid target of educational-improvement activities in the Every Student Succeeds Act, allowing funds to be spent on strengthening it. An updated analysis by students Aziza Arifkhanova, Andriy Bega, Emilio Chavez-Herrerias, Eugene Han and RAND colleagues provides education policymakers with guidance on the use of research-based school leadership programs.

  • U.S. President-elect Donald Trump (center) and Vice President-elect Mike Pence (left) emerge with Betsy DeVos after a meeting at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, November 19, 2016

    Making American Education Great Will Require More Than Charter Schools

    Dec 13, 2016

    The nomination of Betsy DeVos for U.S. Secretary of Education has shone a spotlight on charter schools, writes professor Darleen Opfer. While charters could become an important part of a great education system, this burst of attention poses a risk that other issues will be ignored.

  • Japan's Self Defence Force holds an opening ceremony of a new military base on the island of Yonaguni in the Okinawa prefecture, March 28, 2016

    The Risks of an Accelerating Rivalry Between China and Japan

    Dec 12, 2016

    China and Japan have a long history of antagonism but their competition for influence in Asia has recently expanded in the economic, diplomatic, and security domains. The U.S., although a staunch ally of Japan, has served as a mediator. Weakening the U.S. role could aggravate Sino-Japanese tensions to a destabilizing degree, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Chalk and eraser on chalkboard rail

    How States and Districts Can Leverage the Every Student Succeeds Act to Improve School Leadership

    Dec 12, 2016

    The Every Student Succeeds Act provides states and districts with new chances to invest in school leadership. A review of interventions can serve as a starting point to enact relevant solutions and build the evidence base for what works, writes professor Susan Gates.

  • People work out at an outdoor exercise area at Macombs Dam Park in the Bronx, New York City, September 13, 2012

    Putting Health into the Health Care Debate

    Dec 10, 2016

    How much return is the United States getting for spending over 17 percent of its gross domestic product on health care? Not nearly enough, says professor and alum Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85), vice president and director of RAND Health. The health care debate should focus on improving population health and ensuring the country is getting the biggest bang for its bucks.

  • Solar panels and wind generators against a city view

    Investing in Infrastructure? Don't Forget the Electric Grid

    Dec 7, 2016

    To maximize the potential benefits of a multibillion-dollar smart grid investment, student Kathleen Loa (cohort '12) and professor Aimee Curtright say a closer examination of technology and policy is needed. First, weigh the preferences and constraints of the various stakeholders and how technology can or cannot meet their objectives.

  • Kid with menu

    Changes to Kids' Menus May Help Curb Childhood Obesity

    Dec 5, 2016

    Most kids' menu items at the top 200 U.S. restaurant chains exceed the calorie counts recommended by nutrition experts, according to research by student Cameron Wright (cohort '12) and professor Deborah Cohen. The restaurant industry can embrace calorie guidelines to promote children's health and reduce childhood obesity.

  • Traditional Grains stakeholder meeting

    Bringing Traditional Grains Back to the African Dinner Table

    Dec 2, 2016

    Although they are more nutritious and well-adapted to Africa's agro-ecological conditions, traditional grains have been losing market share to new grains—especially maize, rice and wheat. A joint initiative of Pardee RAND and the African Centre for Economic Transformation explored ways to bring sorghum and millet back to the dinner table, including a series of Superfoods cooking contests.

  • Two students in their graduation robes walking up steps

    One-Stop Social Services Efforts May Improve Community College Outcomes

    Nov 30, 2016

    Students participating in programs that provide a comprehensive range of support services are more likely to persist in attending community college, according to research by alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05).

  • Paul C. Light

    Distinguished Professors to Visit Campus

    Nov 30, 2016

    Pardee RAND will welcome four Distinguished Visiting Professors next quarter. Stanford's Alain Enthoven, Harvard and NBER's Martin Feldstein, and NYU's Paul Light will each be in residence at Pardee RAND this winter. The Ohio State University's Ann Pendleton-Jullian will be visiting until June.

  • Phlebotomist in hospital delivering bag of human blood to doctor

    Building a More Sustainable U.S. Blood System

    Nov 28, 2016

    Medical advances have dramatically reduced demand for blood, putting financial stress on blood centers. Student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) and colleagues examine how policymakers can ensure the safety and sustainability of the blood supply.

  • Female IT professional checking on network servers using a laptop

    To Increase Diversity in Tech, We Need to Rethink What 'Tech' Is

    Nov 17, 2016

    The tech sector is a driving force for high-skill, high-wage job creation in the United States, but too few women and minorities reap the gains. Rethinking what defines today's tech jobs, along with greater investment in public-private partnerships, could go a long way toward bridging the diversity gap, writes student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15).

  • Primary care physician talking to a patient

    Evaluating Policy Options to Increase Primary Care in Washington State

    Nov 15, 2016

    Xiaoyu Nie (cohort '14), Simon Hollands (cohort '15) and fellow RAND researchers evaluated several policy options under consideration by the Washington State legislature to address a possible shortage of primary care physicians.