Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (left) meets with South Korea's acting President Hwang Kyo-ahn in Seoul, February 2, 2017

    Mattis' Mission in Asia

    Feb 6, 2017

    U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis made his first overseas trip this week, visiting Japan and South Korea. Prof. Scott Harold says Mattis reassured them that U.S. alliances in East Asia will remain strong, while also clarifying Washington's expectations.

  • Dr. Martin Feldstein, the George F. Baker Professor of Economics at Harvard University, Speaks at Pardee RAND

    Jan 30, 2017

    On January 30, 2017, Pardee RAND welcomed Dr. Martin Feldstein as part of the Charles Wolf, Jr., Endowed Lecture Series.

  • Venezuelan soldiers patrol during a military operation to destroy clandestine drug laboratories in Zulia, Venezuela, near the border with Colombia, December 6, 2014

    How to Counter Transnational Criminal Networks

    Jan 27, 2017

    Transnational criminal networks have expanded their global reach. In some cases, they have even converged with terrorist groups. Research by alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) and RAND colleagues examines how these networks threaten U.S. interests and what can be done to combat them.

  • Group of women exercising and using their cell phones

    What 32 Million Tweets Tell Us About Health and the Twitterverse

    Jan 26, 2017

    Health-related posts and conversations on Twitter shed light on the public's views on obesity, exercise and fitness, safe sex, alcohol, and mental health. Prof. Douglas Yeung asks, will such discussion increase in communities where health and wellness programs are put in place?

  • Crew Chief Pfc. James Dennis performs a torque check on the main rotor head of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter

    Helping Soldiers Use Army Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities in Civilian Jobs

    Jan 24, 2017

    Some veterans struggle to find jobs after they leave the Army. Alum Michael Shanley (cohort '79) helped to identify a broad range of high-quality civilian jobs that match Army KSAs.

  • Chinese President Xi Jinping attends the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, January 17, 2017

    China Stressed a Growing Interest in Global Trade and Governance at Davos

    Jan 24, 2017

    President Xi Jinping became the first Chinese leader to appear at the annual gathering of the World Economic Forum last week. He gave a keynote speech that defended global trade and criticized protectionism. Prof. Timothy Heath says his speech reflected, in part, the reality that China has profited enormously from decades of globalization.

  • Man using stethoscope to diagnose options in a chart

    Oregon's Options for Financing Health Care

    Jan 19, 2017

    Federal health care reform had just begun in 2013 when Oregon authorized a study to improve how the state pays for health care. A comparison of the projected impacts and feasibility of four options—developed by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), professors Chapin White and Christine Eibner, and several RAND colleagues—can help Oregon's stakeholders choose the option that best suits their needs.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016

    Taking Stock of the U.S. Rebalance and the Contest for Influence in Asia

    Jan 19, 2017

    Since 2011, the U.S. has carried out measures designed to bolster its influence in Asia, a region that is projected to play a central role in driving global economic growth. Prof. Timothy Heath writes that, despite steady progress, with increased diplomatic outreach to China and its neighbors, doubts about the U.S. pivot to Asia have persisted.

  • Man opening a black box with a light inside

    No Company Should Be Able to Keep You from Checking Your Government's Math

    Jan 18, 2017

    Data and computer models are becoming more and more important for making policy decisions on everything from prison sentences to tax bills. Prof. Brian Jackson argues that citizens should be able to “check the math” on decisions that affect them.

  • An electronic billboard displays a marijuana hashtag at Times Square in New York, November 7, 2016

    Trump's Marijuana Options

    Jan 17, 2017

    The new administration will have at least six options for addressing marijuana — they are not mutually exclusive and each comes with tradeoffs, writes Prof. Beau Kilmer. Importantly, they are all compatible with a federal approach that encourages and supports discussions about marijuana prohibition and its alternatives.

  • A still from footage of Dylann Roof, who was convicted of killing nine people at a historically black church in South Carolina

    The Wrong Terrorism Narrative

    Jan 15, 2017

    Solving the problem of homegrown terrorism in the U.S. requires understanding the true nature of the complex problem of violent extremism. Prof. Henry Willis says that, with such knowledge, authorities and communities will be better able to develop strategies to prevent the next tragic terrorist killing.

  • Hospital staff discussing a patient's chart

    Improving MACRA's Chances of Success

    Jan 9, 2017

    Starting in 2019, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act will integrate and potentially simplify performance measurement by combining a number of measures and programs. Research on performance measurement provides a good deal of insight on how to avoid several pitfalls in MACRA's rollout, writes prof. Peter Hussey.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un gives a New Year address in Pyongyang on January 1, 2017

    Trump Should Confront Kim Over ICBM Tests

    Jan 6, 2017

    Whether successful or not, an ICBM test by North Korea would be very much against U.S. interests and President-elect Trump should act to counter it as early as possible. A turn to the basics of deterrence would be the path most likely to succeed, writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75).

  • A man rides a boat near the Ssese Islands in Uganda

    Improving HIV and Mental Health Care in Uganda

    Jan 5, 2017

    A small team of RAND researchers, including two Pardee RAND professors, has spent years working with local clinics in Uganda to help people not just survive HIV, but learn to live with it, and even thrive.

  • Patient filling out forms in a doctor's office

    Can a Continuous Coverage Requirement Produce a Healthy Insurance Market?

    Jan 4, 2017

    A continuous coverage requirement is intended to discourage individuals from waiting until they become sick to purchase insurance. Student Erin Duffy (cohort '15) says such a requirement works well in theory to maintain a healthy marketplace, but there is little evidence on how well it might work in practice.

  • African American soldier sitting in a chair, holding a prescription

    Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Service Members

    Jan 4, 2017

    Prescription drug misuse is of critical concern for the military because of its potential impact on the health and well-being of personnel, military readiness, and associated health care costs. Alumni Janice Blanchard (cohort '98) and Jennifer Walters (cohort '11) worked with RAND colleagues to offer ideas for addressing the problem.

  • RAND Celebrates Alum Rick Fallon's Career

    Jan 4, 2017

    Pardee RAND alum Rick Fallon (cohort '75) retired from RAND in January 2017 after two decades of service. As CFO and VP of Finance & Administration, Fallon worked on critical business decisions, performance measures, and initiatives that have increased the agility of RAND's operations.

  • A 155 mm artillery tube enters a heat treatment furnace at Watervliet Arsenal to improve the microstructure and hardness of the steel

    Uncertainty Ahead: Defense Technology and Acquisition Trends in 2017

    Jan 3, 2017

    Prof. Cynthia Cook writes that the change in administration, coupled with the new management structure being imposed by Congress on the Department of Defense's acquisition enterprise, is creating a shifting and unpredictable landscape for 2017.

  • A woman rides a bike past Taiwan and China national flags during a rally held by a group of pro-China supporters calling for peaceful reunification, Taiwan May 14, 2016.

    Walking Away from One-China Policy Imperils Taiwan

    Dec 22, 2016

    The U.S. One-China policy has helped keep the peace for decades. Abandoning it now could result in stiffer Chinese resolve. Such a strategy may even backfire by triggering an otherwise avoidable crisis, writes prof. Michael Chase.

  • The Pentagon, headquarters of the United States Department of Defense, taken from an airplane in January 2008

    Approaching Future Offsets

    Dec 21, 2016

    Grand strategy, acquisitions, and technological considerations may shape the debate about the future of the U.S. military for some time to come. Only where all three elements align are future offsets likely to succeed, writes alum Yuna Huh Wong (cohort '00).

  • Technician working in a control room

    Carrier Deal Does Not Carry the Day for American Workers

    Dec 21, 2016

    Despite the good intentions, pressuring companies like Carrier to keep jobs in the U.S. addresses only the smaller part of the problem, globalization. Professors Krishna Kumar and Lynn Karoly suggest a long-term solution would be to upgrade the education and training system so students graduate with skills for life-long learning.

  • Digital Tablet with stethoscope and brain scan

    Toward a Learning Behavioral Health Care System

    Dec 20, 2016

    New technologies for capturing and sharing data have begun to transform the way providers practice medicine in the United States. Expanding these technologies to behavioral health care could enhance the delivery of services and improve outcomes for millions of Americans, writes alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97).

  • Man looking at chart of China's stock market

    Cracks in the Chinese Powerhouse

    Dec 19, 2016

    Like most countries that have experienced rapid development, China is struggling to transition from a highly successful but unsustainable economic model. Beijing faces the additional challenge of executing difficult reforms in the face of an inhospitable global economy, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Susan, students, alumni, and the Grinch

    Pardee RAND Celebrates Season with Festive Party

    Dec 19, 2016

    Students, alumni, faculty, and staff rang in the 2016 holiday season in true Pardee RAND style on December 8. Students Etienne Rosas (cohort '14) and Claire O'Hanlon (cohort 13), alum Eric Larson (cohort '89) and executive assistant Jennifer Prim provided live musical entertainment for the many attendees.

  • A group of young adults stretching in a dance class

    Insuring Younger Adults Through the ACA's Marketplaces: Options to Expand Enrollment

    Dec 16, 2016

    Whether or not the Affordable Care Act is repealed, having young adults participate in the individual health insurance market remains critical to achieving affordable premiums for everyone, writes Prof. Christine Eibner.