Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • New mother resting in maternity room after childbirth

    Effects of Removing Maternity Care and Mental Health Treatment from Coverage Requirements

    May 18, 2017

    The American Health Care Act passed by the U.S. House of Representatives to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act allows states to waive benefits that the ACA deemed “essential.” Dropping maternity care coverage, for example, would reduce premiums by 5 percent but increase out-of-pocket spending for new mothers, writes professor Christine Eibner.

  • A mother and her child walk along the Ganges river during a dust storm on a hot summer day in Allahabad, India, June 9, 2015

    Where Are India's Heat Hotspots?

    May 17, 2017

    Poverty, poor sanitation, a precarious water and electricity supply, and limited access to health care make India vulnerable to heat waves. Rural and urban districts could improve their preparedness by developing and targeting local adaptation strategies, writes student Gulrez Azhar (cohort '14).

  • Kampala street food vendor Monica Kayagi makes a recipe during the Superfoods Cook-Off in December 2016

    What Street Food Vendors in Uganda Need to Succeed

    May 16, 2017

    Street vendors in Kampala, Uganda, would benefit from infrastructure development, food safety standards, rules of hygiene, and greater focus on healthy products, write student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and professor Deborah Cohen. The city's growing population also would benefit from increased access to nutritious and affordable foods.

  • An artist's rendering of a refueling depot for deep-space exploration between Earth and the moon

    Mining the Moon for Rocket Fuel to Get Us to Mars

    May 16, 2017

    Students from around the world—including our own Therese Jones (cohort '13)—participated in the 2017 Caltech Space Challenge. They proposed designs of what a lunar launch and supply station for deep space missions might look like, and how it would work.

  • U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (L) meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Washington, U.S., May 3, 2017.

    Toward a Renewed Middle East Peace Process

    May 11, 2017

    Momentum is building toward resumption of the dormant Middle East peace process. But alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) says there will need to be a clear, consistent plan that delivers quick, tangible results to both sides and helps restore trust between them in order for a peace plan to succeed.

  • Ugandan chefs display their creations at the first Superfoods Contest in December 2015

    A New Ugandan Cuisine: Showcasing Superfood Qualities of Millet and Sorghum

    May 9, 2017

    The results of a series of cooking contests in Uganda to promote the use of drought-tolerant, nutritious traditional grains—millet and sorghum—signal that a new food trend may be on the horizon. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and professor Deborah Cohen describe their Pardee Initiative "Superfoods" project in this first of three blog posts.

  • Reserve Officers Training Corps, Clemson University

    Strategic Planning Tools for the Army Senior ROTC Program

    May 5, 2017

    Researchers created a program evaluation tool and a selection evaluation tool to help the Army evaluate existing ROTC programs and explore new market opportunities, keep up with changes in the college student population, and meet both near-term officer production goals as well as longer-term strategic objectives.

  • Preschool-age children laugh while their teacher reads them a book during story time

    Informing Investments in High-Quality Preschool

    May 5, 2017

    In this congressional briefing, Prof Lynn Karoly presents findings from her research, which compiles the most reliable evidence concerning the short- and long-run effects of high-quality preschool programs for participating children and the associated costs, benefits, and economic returns.

  • Steam rises from the coal-fired Jim Bridger power plant outside Rock Springs, Wyoming, April 5, 2017

    Impact on the Environment from President Trump's First 100 Days

    May 4, 2017

    President Trump's actions have not yet resulted in demonstrable change in environmental conditions or funding, but the groundwork is being laid for unwinding major regulations and diminishing staff within the EPA and other federal agencies with climate-related research in their portfolios, says professor Debra Knopman.

  • Man using credit card and smartphone

    Prototype Tool Designed to Help Law Enforcement Use Data from Mobile Applications

    May 1, 2017

    Student Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) worked with alumni Anne Boustead ('11) and Steven Isley ('10) and professor Ed Balkovich to document a prototype tool called MIKE (the Mobile Information and Knowledge Ecosystem) that can help interested stakeholders — law enforcement, commercial enterprises, regulators, legislators, and the public (including advocacy groups) — better understand the mobile app ecosystem and the relationships among the data, its sources, and applicable legal constraints.

  • The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson, left, along with ships from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, transit the East China Sea, March 9, 2017

    U.S.-China Tensions Are Unlikely to Lead to War

    May 1, 2017

    The U.S.-China relationship today may be trending towards greater tension, but the relative stability and overall low level of hostility make the prospect of an accidental escalation to war extremely unlikely, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Alum Yong-Sup Han Visits to Discuss North Korea

    May 1, 2017

    Alum Yong-Sup Han (cohort '88), vice president of the Research Institute on National Security Affairs at Korea National Defense University, visited RAND to discuss the U.S. defense policy toward North Korea. He was invited by the RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy.

  • U.S. Coast Guardsmen unload 3,500 pounds of cocaine seized from a vessel in the Caribbean valued at an estimated $43 million in Miami, March 16, 2012

    Mixed Messages: Is Cocaine Consumption in the U.S. Going Up or Down?

    Apr 28, 2017

    Data lags and the elimination of the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program complicate estimates of U.S. cocaine consumption. New users who haven't yet developed cocaine dependence are also a factor. Professor Beau Kilmer and alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) suggest it may be prudent to start planning for an increase in heavy use even before all of the evidence is in.

  • Students Present Research, Moderate Panels at APPAM Regional Student Conference

    Apr 28, 2017

    In lieu of the annual L.A. Policy Symposium, policy graduate students across Southern California gathered for the 2017 APPAM Regional Student Conference. Pardee RAND students made an impressive showing, with more than 20 presenting research or moderating panels.

  • 2016-17 Brown Faculty Chairs Mix Work and Play

    Apr 25, 2017

    As Brown Faculty Chairs, professors Lisa Meredith and John Davis engaged with students across a range of academic activities. They also organized happy hours, lunches, and even a bike ride.

  • Three children in Bar Kawach, Barlonyo, Uganda

    Lessons from Northern Uganda: Post-Conflict Integration of 'Children Born of War'

    Apr 12, 2017

    Children conceived as a result of sexual violence during armed conflict face socioeconomic marginalization, family rejection, stigmatization, and violence. Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) examines ways societies can address the unique needs of the thousands of "children born of war."

  • Opposing red and blue ropes pulling on a stethoscope

    Drama over Health Care Continues

    Apr 11, 2017

    In this Call with the Experts, Prof Christine Eibner discusses the Affordable Care Act, what policymakers should consider, and changes that the current administration could make.

  • U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping at the Mar-a-Lago estate after a bilateral meeting in Palm Beach, Florida, April 7, 2017

    Rocky Road Ahead Likely for U.S.-China Relations

    Apr 11, 2017

    The first summit with President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping downplayed contentious issues like Taiwan and the South China Sea. But the differences run deep, writes professor Timothy Heath, and frustration is palpable on both sides. Moreover, the competition for international leadership continues.

  • U.S. President Donald Trump holds a bilateral meeting with China's President Xi Jinping at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., April 7, 2017

    Five Dead-Ends — and One Risky Opportunity — When Trump and Xi Talk North Korea

    Apr 10, 2017

    Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) writes that, among President Trump's options, proposing a deal that gives the North Korean elite an alternative to its murderous and unstable leader could be the safest and most realistic way to sheath North Korean nuclear weapons and safeguard the American people.

  • An autonomous version of Acura's RLX Sport Hybrid SH-AWD navigates around a dummy at carmaker Honda's testing grounds at the GoMentum Station autonomous vehicle test facility in Concord, California June 1, 2016

    How California Is Trying to Keep Autonomous Vehicle Development on Track

    Apr 10, 2017

    California's Department of Motor Vehicles recently proposed new regulations governing the testing and deployment of autonomous vehicles. Professor Nidhi Kalra asks, will this help retain the state's status as a testing and deployment ground for the technology, and will it make California safer?

  • Regional APPAM Conference in April to Feature a Record 18 Students

    Apr 10, 2017

    At APPAM's 2017 California Regional Student Conference, 18 Pardee RAND students will present their research across a wide variety of policy areas.

  • Prisoners after a graduation ceremony from a computer coding program at San Quentin State Prison in San Quentin, California, April 20, 2015

    Why Prison Education Matters

    Apr 6, 2017

    In this Events @ RAND podcast, Prof Lois Davis and a panel of experts discuss the costs and benefits of using education to stop the prison revolving door, and the effectiveness of programs like The Last Mile, which prepares inmates for reentry by providing them with marketable skills.

  • RAND Annual Report Features 'The Pardee RAND Advantage'

    Apr 4, 2017

    The 2016 RAND Annual Report includes 10 pages about Pardee RAND students, research, innovation, courses, and more. Featured student projects include the Food-Energy-Water Index, investing in traffic safety, women in the Marine Corps infantry, virtual currency, and identifying disease hot-spots.

  • Bulgarian president Rossen Plevneliev, alum Anna-Marie Vilamovska, and the Polish Ambassador to Bulgaria, H.E. Krzystof Krajewski

    Alum Vilamovska Receives Award for Service to Poland

    Apr 3, 2017

    Anna-Marie Vilamovska (cohort '05) is one of the youngest recipients of Poland's Commander Cross of the Order of Merit, which was bestowed upon her in December for her contributions to the development of Polish-Bulgarian cooperation.

  • Girl pointing to her meal choice on a restaurant menu

    Just Right: Combatting Childhood Obesity Through Portion Size

    Mar 27, 2017

    Single-serving guidelines can help kids avoid eating too much when eating out. Student Cameron Wright (cohort '12) and professor Deborah Cohen created this infographic summarizing right-sized portions for kids.