Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • 3D printer in action

    3D Printing: Downstream Production Transforming the Supply Chain

    Aug 11, 2017

    Student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) and prof. Geoffrey Torrington provide a framework to help understand the potential impacts of 3D printing technology in a military context—and help the DoD think about future impacts on its supply chain.

  • 2017 Faculty Leaders Program participants

    School Hosts Fifth Annual Faculty Leaders Program

    Aug 10, 2017

    Pardee RAND held its fifth annual Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development workshop to encourage diversity in the next generation of policy analysts and leaders, July 24–28. The School welcomed 14 faculty members from colleges and universities that serve students who are traditionally underrepresented in public policy.

  • A woman on an MRI machine talking to her doctor

    Extending Marketplace Tax Credits Would Make Coverage More Affordable for Middle-Income Adults

    Jul 27, 2017

    Paying for health care coverage is a challenge for Americans facing rising premiums, deductibles, and copayments. Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner say the ACA's tax credits that make marketplace insurance more affordable for lower-income individuals should be extended to middle-income adults aged 50–64.

  • An Israeli tank drives near the border as it returns to Israel from Gaza, August 3, 2014

    Lessons from Israel's Wars in Gaza

    Jul 26, 2017

    The Israel Defense Force had to evolve to meet an adaptive and determined hybrid adversary during its wars in Gaza. Student Elizabeth Bartels (cohort '15) and alum/prof Shira Efron (cohort '11) found that the U.S. Army and the joint force can learn from the IDF's challenge of balancing intense international legal public scrutiny and the hard operational realities of urban warfare.

  • Norris Discusses Increasing Diversity in the 21st Century: The Role of Mentoring

    Jul 25, 2017

    Dr. Keith Norris, an internationally recognized clinician scientist and health policy leader at the UCLA Geffen School of Medicine, discussed the role of mentoring to increase diversity in the field of biomedical and health research. He was the keynote speaker at the fifth annual Pardee RAND Faculty Leaders Program.

  • A house with energy-efficient solar panels on the roof

    Getting (Solar) Electricity Pricing Right

    Jul 24, 2017

    For many U.S. homeowners, an investment in rooftop solar is becoming a cost-competitive alternative to purchasing grid electricity. But student Benjamin Smith (cohort '15) and professors Nick Burger and Aimee Curtright note that, as demand soars, states are struggling to adapt a 20th-century electrical grid to 21st-century supply and demand, leading to confusion and cost uncertainty.

  • A man being arrested for drug possession

    Should California Drop Criminal Penalties for Drug Possession?

    Jul 20, 2017

    Californians have a lot to consider when it comes to decriminalizing possession. But professor Beau Kilmer sayd now is the time for a rigorous discussion about removing criminal penalties for drug possession, rather than rushing to judgment in the heat of a future election season.

  • Water line repair in a city street

    Pittsburgh's Options to Address Lead in Its Water

    Jul 18, 2017

    Pittsburgh is struggling to improve its aging water system. Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and alum/professor Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) review the history and recent developments related to the use of lead pipes and the policy options for lead remediation currently being weighed by local decisionmakers.

  • “The History of a Fénix” depicts the scars left on the arms of Natalia Ponce de León after an acid attack

    A Colombian Survivor's Crusade to Strengthen Punishment for Acid Attacks

    Jul 17, 2017

    Acid attacks—one of the most extreme forms of violence against women and girls—have devastating, lifelong consequences for survivors. Student Mahlet Woldetsadik (cohort '13) writes that governments can, like Colombia, impose tougher punishments on attackers and support programs to build survivors' self-confidence.

  • North Korea's Continuous Provocations

    Jul 17, 2017

    In this July 17th, 2017 congressional briefing, alum Bruce W. Bennett (cohort '75), Senior International/Defense Researcher at RAND, discusses North Korea's nuclear missile programs, its changing relationship with China, and implications for U.S. policy.

  • The Terrorist Diaspora

    Jul 13, 2017

    An overview of the testimony presented by Prof Colin Clarke before the House Homeland Security Committee Task Force on Denying Terrorists Entry into the United States on July 13, 2017.

  • Aerial view of solar farm in central Texas

    Navigating the Uncertain Path to Decarbonization

    Jul 11, 2017

    Deep decarbonization can reduce the risk of climate change, and it offers opportunities to reimagine energy, transportation, and infrastructure. But Prof. Robert Lempert says it could also fail in many ways. Diverse, independent actors need a shared understanding of its complexity and deep uncertainty to design a solution to this challenge.

  • Woman paying at a medical reception desk

    Ingredients for Health Care Reform

    Jul 10, 2017

    Despite their differences, the Affordable Care Act and the current proposals to replace it take a similar approach to providing health insurance. Prof. Christine Eibner asks, What might some alternatives look like? And how could they provide coverage to more Americans?

  • Ambulances line the street after explosions interrupted the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013

    Lessons for First Responders on the Front Lines of Terrorism

    Jul 10, 2017

    Given the persistent risk of terrorist attacks, it is critical to learn from past incidents to prepare for future ones, writes Prof. Chris Nelson. Medical and nonmedical first responders need more training in basic lifesaving skills. Open communication lines such as a dedicated radio frequency could help responders better coordinate. Disaster drills are also essential.

  • Filling up a glass with water from a kitchen faucet

    Getting the Lead Out of Pittsburgh's Water

    Jul 3, 2017

    Without an aggressive long-term strategy for replacing service lines, and collaboration among the water authority, public officials, and residents, lead in Pittsburgh's water will persist, writes Prof. Jordan Fischbach (alum, cohort '04).

  • Soldiers provide perimeter security outside a village where troops search for a weapons cache in the Spin Boldak district in Afghanistan's Kandahar province, March 3, 2013

    How to Bolster Recruitment of Women in the Military

    Jun 28, 2017

    As ground combat jobs are transitioning to include women, efforts to improve the recruitment process are expanding. Having more female recruiters would help, as would outreach materials that counter stereotypes and highlight the roles women fill in the military, according to research by student Christina Steiner (cohort '09) and professors Doug Yeung, Chaitra Hardison, and Lawrence Hanser.

  • The Santa Monica Pier in California, illuminated at night with a reflection on shoreline

    The Effects of Travel and Tourism on California's Economy

    Jun 27, 2017

    California's travel and tourism industry employs a diverse workforce that makes a meaningful contribution to the state's economy. Student Olena Bogdan (cohort '12) and professor Ed Keating find that, for some, the industry offers a stable career path with good wages and wage growth. For others, it's a launching point into other industries.

  • Spring 2017 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Jun 21, 2017

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about the six new Pardee RAND analytic Methods Centers, Dean Susan Marquis' visit to China (with alum Hui Wang, cohort '88), student presenters and moderators at the regional APPAM conference, and more.

  • A middle-aged woman working in an office

    'Principal Pipelines' Can Be an Affordable Way to Improve Schools

    Jun 20, 2017

    Improving school leadership by better selecting, training, and evaluating principals can be an affordable way to reduce turnover and improve schools, according to research by Melody Harvey (cohort '12) and professor Susan Gates.

  • A cannabis farm in eastern Washington state

    States vs. the Federal Government: Marijuana Legalization in the United States

    Jun 9, 2017

    In this June 9th, 2017 congressional briefing, Prof Beau Kilmer, codirector of the RAND Drug Policy Research Center, provides an overview of recent changes in marijuana policies as well as options for the federal government.

  • Dice representing flags of United States, China, and Russia on a world map

    Gaming Solutions to Global Problems

    Jun 8, 2017

    In this Call with the Experts, Prof David Shlapak, a senior international research analyst at RAND, talks about how serious games can help find solutions to global problems.

  • Male hands holding tablet,

    A 'Learning System' in Behavioral Health Can Help in Sharing Best Practices, Innovations

    May 30, 2017

    Leveraging technological advances to make better use of the best available data could help rein in healthcare costs and improve both quality and safety, writes alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). This makes sense whether the health care being delivered is physical or behavioral.

  • A man studying in his apartment

    How to Navigate Public-Private Partnerships in Higher Ed

    May 26, 2017

    Universities are partnering with private companies that have the resources to help them compete in the online learning market and maximize student enrollment. Professors Rita Karam and Charles Goldman consider, do their different missions — providing high-quality education and making a profit — dilute the quality of the courses?

  • Youth foodies Ojangole Max Igune and Regina Nantege create a recipe at the October 2017 Superfoods cook-off in Kampala, Uganda

    How Uganda Could Benefit from a Center for Food Innovation

    May 23, 2017

    A training and innovation center that trains and certifies street food vendors to address issues related to food hygiene, safety, and quality would accelerate the growth of a new Ugandan cuisine that capitalizes on nutritious local ingredients in a sustainable manner, write student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) and professor Deborah Cohen.

  • Graduates tossing their mortarboards in the air

    Is College Worth the Expense? Yes, It Is

    May 22, 2017

    Many American students struggle with the soaring cost of higher education, and for many college-going students, student debt can have severe negative implications. On balance, though, the benefits of a college degree appear to outweigh the costs, writes professor Rafiq Dossani.