Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Statement from the Dean on Racial Injustice

    The call for social justice that has swept across our nation and the world over this past week demands that we listen, learn, and do more to “shine the light that reveals the dust” and to do the hard work of building a better world not just this week but for years to come. It is my fervent hope that our community will rise to the occasion and live up to our motto, Be the Answer.

  • Coronavirus shown against world map and trend lines, illustration by chakisatelier/Adobe Stock

    Responding to COVID-19 with Research and Analysis

    Members of the Pardee RAND community are actively contributing to the COVID-19 response by sharing their expertise and searching for solutions to coronavirus-related challenges on local, state, national, and global levels.

  • Profile with fingerprint on a red background, photo by malerapaso/Getty Images

    Profs: Bans on Facial Recognition Are Naïve. Hold Law Enforcement Accountable for Its Abuse

    Jun 17, 2020

    Broader police reform may be difficult to achieve, write professors Osonde Osoba and Douglas Yeung. But in the long run, it will be more effective than any specific technology ban.

  • Morehouse College President Discusses Social Justice

    Jun 12, 2020

    To help the Pardee RAND community better examine and respond to racial injustice and inequity, Morehouse College president David Thomas engaged in a dialogue with Dean Susan Marquis on the topic “From Outrage to Action: Where do we go from here?” Open to all at RAND, more than 250 people participated.

  • Policy Reading Circle Expands Summer Reading Discussion

    Jun 8, 2020

    Each year, the dean sends incoming students a summer reading list to set the stage for their academic experience. This year, we are opening the discussion through a virtual book club. Topics include inequality in America, racism and antiracism, and issues of pandemic response.

  • People stand in line at Harlem's Community Kitchen and Food Pantry in New York City, May 9, 2020, photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters

    How Are Americans Paying Their Bills During the Pandemic?

    Jun 3, 2020

    About one-third of U.S. households have experienced a decline in income as a result of COVID-19. Professors Katherine Carman and Shanthi Nataraj find that roughly 30 percent of these households—especially low-income, black, or Hispanic households—are having difficulties paying their bills.

  • Bowman Honored as NM 40 Under Forty

    Jun 2, 2020

    As chief information and strategy officer for Albuquerque Public Schools, New Mexico's largest school district, alum Richard Bowman (cohort '06) is quite busy these days. But the recipient of a 2020 "New Mexico 40 Under Forty" award was happy to make some time for an interview.

  • School Pivots to Confront COVID-19 Pandemic

    May 28, 2020

    With stay-at-home orders in place starting in mid-March, virtually every aspect of our Ph.D. program has been affected. Through online courses, research, dissertation defenses, school-wide town halls, and even parties and trivia nights, Pardee RANDites have remained socially close if physically distant. Students, faculty, and staff have met the challenge with characteristic spirit.

  • A health insurance application on a tablet, photo by grinvalds/Getty Images

    Alum: How Would a Public Option on Health Insurance Affect Costs and Coverage?

    May 28, 2020

    Interest in a government-sponsored health insurance plan with publicly determined provider rates is growing. An analysis by Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and RAND colleagues looked at four such "public option" plans and found that lower provider payment rates would lower premiums. But the impact on enrollees would also depend on tax credits, and changes to the number of uninsured would be small.

  • A man carries food donated by Alianza Ecuatoriana International at a food pantry in Queens, New York, May 16, 2020, photo by Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

    Alum and Prof: Emergency COVID-19 Aid Helps College Students with Food and Housing

    May 26, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic has expanded the pool of cash-strapped college students, but many were already struggling. Alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05) and Prof. Drew Anderson say the crisis could draw attention to food and housing insecurity among college students, and give college leaders a chance to consider how to address these needs more systematically over the long-term.

  • People have lunch at a restaurant that reopened with plastic barriers and social distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Bangkok, Thailand, May 8, 2020, photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

    Modeling the Future of COVID-19: Q&A with Pardee RAND Faculty

    May 26, 2020

    The phrase “flatten the curve” familiarized millions of Americans with epidemiological models used to estimate virus transmission, cases, and potential deaths from COVID-19. But Profs. Jeanne Ringel and Raffaele Vardavas say new models are needed as the country enters a different stage of the crisis, one in which changed behaviors must be taken into account.

  • Teacher at home during pandemic isolation teaching students, photo bysvetikd/Getty Images

    COVID-19 and the State of K–12 Schools

    May 26, 2020

    How have teachers and school leaders navigated the challenging circumstances introduced by COVID-19? Survey data analyzed by student Melissa Diliberti (cohort '19) and RAND colleagues help gauge how the pandemic has affected schooling and how districts are planning for the next school year.

  • Lisa Rowland, owner of Dog's Best Friend, trims the coat of a poodle as dog grooming services gradually reopen during the COVID-19 outbreak, in Pasadena, California, May 21, 2020, photo by Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

    Student Examines How Small Businesses Are Surviving the COVID-19 Pandemic

    May 22, 2020

    Small-business owners are facing many challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Diana Gehlhaus (cohort '15) helped research what kinds of policies might help them and what will they need to thrive once the immediate public health crisis has passed.

  • Crowds gather at Buffalo Bayou Park as social distancing guidelines to curb the spread of COVID-19 are relaxed in Houston, Texas, May 4, 2020, photo by Callaghan O'Hare/Reuters

    Profs: Relaxing COVID-19 Restrictions Presents Stark Health and Economic Choices

    May 18, 2020

    RAND's new publicly available COVID-19 interventions impact tool uses epidemiological and economic models and continually refreshed data to estimate what could happen as restrictions are eased. Professors Ringel, Vardavas, and Strong say the tool—which they developed with the help of five Pardee RAND students—cannot make the choices confronting state leaders less painful, but it can provide clear evidence-based estimates of the health and economic trade-offs.

  • A woman checks her mobile phone next to a poster promoting a project of the Belt and Road in Colombo, Sri Lanka at China International Fair for Trade in Services in Beijing, China, May 28, 2019, photo by Jason Lee/Reuters

    Student Helps to Demystify the Belt and Road Initiative

    May 13, 2020

    China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) aims to connect its partner countries domestically and globally. Though the project appears to address a critical shortage of infrastructure in developing countries, it has been widely criticized. Keren Zhu (cohort '17) and colleagues explore what is at the heart of these critiques.

  • Mata Takes Community-Partnered Residence Online

    May 12, 2020

    The community-partnered stream's inaugural practitioner-in-residence, the Rev. Michael Mata arrived on campus on March 11. His four-week "residency" soon flipped, with many successful online events.

  • An ancient sculpture of a god's face superimposed over source code, images by Adolf and kentoh/Adobe Stock

    Student Examines How to Track and Disrupt the Looted Antiquities Trade

    May 12, 2020

    The sale of stolen cultural property provides an important funding source for terrorist organizations and rogue states. Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) helped to compile new evidence from numerous open sources that shows how the illicit antiquities market operates and ways law enforcement might be able to disrupt it.

  • A laboratory technician working on research for a vaccine against COVID-19 in Bern, Switzerland, April 22, 2020, photo by Arnd Wiegmann/Reuters

    Profs: Blueprint Needed for a Post-Vaccine World

    May 11, 2020

    When a COVID-19 vaccine is developed, many in rich countries may be able to afford it while the poor and uninsured may not. In poor countries, most people won't be able to pay. Professors Krishna Kumar and Chris Nelson say the time to plan for equitable access, financing, intellectual property rights, and global production is now.

  • Kim Jong-un attends the completion of a fertilizer plant north of Pyongyang, in this image released by KCNA on May 2, 2020, photo by KCNA/Reuters

    Alum: North Korean Provocations, Not Denuclearization

    May 8, 2020

    Kim Jong-un's reappearance raises questions about the course of U.S.–North Korea relationships in the coming year, writes Bruce Bennett (cohort '75). What should we expect? What can we learn from the past?

  • Yuna Wong standing behind a wargame, photo by Dori Walker/RAND Corporation

    The Serious Side of Gaming: Q&A with Yuna Wong

    May 8, 2020

    Alum Yuna Wong (cohort '00), codirector of RAND's Center for Gaming, didn't expect to make gaming a focus of her career. In this interview, she discusses what drew her to the field, what makes a good wargame, and her latest research on the dangers of putting too much trust in artificial intelligence.

  • A man speaks with a library worker after receiving an unemployment form in Hialeah, Florida, April 8, 2020, photo by Marco Bello/Reuters

    Prof Asks, Is the Unemployment Rate Now Higher Than It Was in the Great Depression?

    May 7, 2020

    The extent of COVID-19's effect on the labor market will be catastrophic for many workers and businesses, writes Prof. Kathryn Edwards. Matching the unemployment rate peak set by the Great Depression is a possibility, but reaching this unfortunate milestone is not necessary to establish the historic nature of the downturn we are living through today.

  • Glass of whiskey with scales of justice in the background

    Alum and Prof Evaluate 24/7 Sobriety Program at Individual Level

    May 7, 2020

    24/7 Sobriety combines frequent alcohol testing with swift, certain, and modest sanctions for those who test positive for alcohol or miss a test. Alum Greg Midgette and Prof. Beau Kilmer used an instrumental variables approach for this study and found 24/7 reduced the probability a participant was rearrested or had probation revoked at 12 months by 49%.