Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Evaluation of Mental Health Service Act in L.A. County Shows Services Reaching Those in Need

    Mar 13, 2018

    Los Angeles County uses Mental Health Services Act funds programs to reach at-risk populations. Students Gulrez Shah Azhar and Margaret Chamberlin found that the county was able to offer services and prevention efforts that lowered both homelessness and the need for psychiatric hospitalizations, while improving employment and wellbeing.

  • Gaza on the Brink

    Mar 9, 2018

    The combined risk of violence and pandemic in Gaza makes this small coastal enclave a ticking time bomb, writes Prof. Shira Efron (alum, cohort '11). While neither Israel nor the U.S. has the solutions to all of Gaza's water and health woes, the United States' decision to withhold funding to the U.N. Relief and Works Agency could only make things worse.

  • Open Science and a Culture of Health: You Two Should Talk

    Mar 7, 2018

    By working together, writes Prof. Sean Grant, the Culture of Health and Open Science movements could increase their potential to accelerate the use of scientific evidence to address impediments to population health and collective well-being.

  • One Belt, One Road, One Ruler: China Term Limits Ban Imperils Progress

    Mar 6, 2018

    The abolition of presidential term limits in China represents a sea change in Communist Party politics and signals the consolidation of personalist rule by President Xi Jinping. Student Bill Gelfeld (cohort '14) explains that deviations from term limits are deleterious for good governance, political rights, and accountability.

  • Dean's Movie Night Features The Post

    Mar 6, 2018

    Pardee RAND held a special screening of the recent movie about the Pentagon Papers. Prof. Molly Selvin moderated a post-screening panel that featured RAND president Michael Rich and media rights attorney and former LA Times First Amendment counsel Karlene Goller. They discussed the film, first amendment law, and how the Pentagon Papers impacted RAND.

  • Giving Spotlight: Josh and Kristin Weed Continue Family Tradition

    Mar 6, 2018

    For alum Josh Weed (cohort '01) and his wife Kristin, giving back to Pardee RAND is a family affair. They have a strong sense of giving back to the school, and are regular donors. They also attend commencement whenever possible, and Josh conducts alumni interviews with applicants to school.

  • Ready, Set, College

    Mar 5, 2018

    With at least $1 billion going toward developmental education, writes alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), states and colleges have started to rethink their approaches to reform. But it may be too soon for states to put into place broad “one size fits all” policies. In the meantime, should states do nothing?

  • The Science of Gun Policy

    Mar 2, 2018

    What does the scientific evidence tell us about the effects of gun policies? Students Eric Apaydin, John Speed Meyers, and Rouslan Karimov worked on the RAND Gun Policy in America initiative, coauthoring a report that assesses the available evidence for the effects of commonly proposed gun laws on firearm deaths, violent crime, suicide, the gun industry, hunting and sport shooting, and other outcomes.

  • 'Alexa, What Do You Know About Me, and Who Are You Telling?'

    Mar 1, 2018

    Professors Osonde Osoba and Bill Welser, with RAND colleague Rebecca Balebako, discussed the prevalence of artificial intelligence and how it affects privacy. They raised questions about fairness and equity in regard to privacy and data use, but also highlighted positive trends and developments in the evolving AI-privacy landscape.

  • Are New York Health Providers Ready to Meet Veterans' Needs?

    Mar 1, 2018

    Few civilian health providers in New York are ready to provide timely, quality care to veterans, according to research by student Erin Duffy (cohort '15) and RAND colleagues. More than 90 percent of providers were accepting new patients. But only about 2 percent met all criteria for effectively serving veterans.

  • What Next for China-Pakistan Relations?

    Feb 26, 2018

    The recent downgrade in U.S.-Pakistan relations will present both opportunities and challenges for China, writes student Keren Zhu (cohort '17). Beijing can use the recent strain to promote a new model of international development, but must be wary of becoming the sole external power responsible for maintaining stability in the region.

  • Designing and Implementing Corequisite Models of Developmental Education

    Feb 23, 2018

    Alum Lindsey Daugherty (cohort '05) and students Diana Gehlhaus Carew ('15) and Alexandra Mendoza-Graf ('16) examined the implementation of integrated reading and writing corequisites—a reform to developmental education that accelerates students into college-level courses, while providing academic support—in Texas community colleges.

  • The Long Game on Infrastructure

    Feb 20, 2018

    The Trump administration recently announced its Legislative Outline for Rebuilding Infrastructure in America. But with its lack of new federal funding, write Profs. Debra Knopman and Martin Wachs, the plan may not be the best path to fixing America's most serious regional, national and long-term problems.

  • Where Will ISIS Seek to Establish Its Next Safe Haven?

    Feb 19, 2018

    Many of ISIS's surviving fighters will seek out new battlefields to continue waging jihad, writes Prof. Colin Clarke. By coordinating with its allies around the globe, the U.S. could work to help alleviate the conditions that lead states to fail, making them less appealing as sanctuaries where terrorists can rest, rearm, and recuperate.

  • Erdogan's Fatal Blind Spot

    Feb 16, 2018

    Erdogan's tolerance of ISIS fighters in Turkey amounts to tacit approval, writes Prof. Colin Clarke. The danger posed by ISIS using Turkey as a staging ground could become more formidable than the threat currently posed by Kurdish terrorism. Tolerating ISIS to fight the Kurds is therefore a dangerous and myopic policy.

  • How Does U.S. Military Presence Affect Conflict?

    Feb 15, 2018

    Stationing U.S. forces can be an effective tool in deterring state aggression, but this doesn't appear to reduce the risk of intrastate conflict, according to research coauthored by student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14). There is also an important trade-off: U.S. troop presence may provoke more militarized activities short of war.

  • How Will Cannabis Legalization Affect Alcohol Consumption?

    Feb 13, 2018

    How will legalization of recreational marijuana affect alcohol consumption? Will drinking go down because people substitute cannabis for alcohol? Or will drinking go up because cannabis and alcohol complement each other? Prof. Beau Kilmer says these questions have important implications.

  • Dean's Report Highlights First Fruits of Redesign

    Feb 6, 2018

    Pardee RAND's redesign is intended to provide new capabilities and capacities for its students but, importantly, also to RAND. The 2017 Dean's Report showcases "the first fruits of this evolution/transformation and how they are benefiting our students and RAND researchers."

  • Evaluating Progress Toward Increasing Global Contraceptive Use

    Feb 5, 2018

    In 2013, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched two programs to help monitor progress toward a global goal to increase modern contraceptive use by 2020. Students Bill Gelfeld, Michele Abbott, Gabriela Armenta, Rouslan I. Karimov, Adeyemi Okunogbe, Uzaib Saya, and Mahlet A. Woldetsadik evaluated these programs and found opportunities for improvement.

  • Examining the Food-Energy-Water and Conflict Nexus

    Jan 31, 2018

    Student Michele Abbott (cohort '14) used the Pardee RAND Food-Energy-Water (FEW) Index to identify a positive, significant correlation between FEW security and political stability, and reviewed the evidence for how each of these three types of resource insecurities affects political and social stability.

  • Obesity May Be 'Socially Contagious'

    Jan 25, 2018

    Alum Ashlesha Datar (cohort '99) and Prof. Nancy Nicosia found that people who move to a high-obesity area are more likely to become overweight or obese. This may be due, in part, to “social contagion.” Living in a community where obesity is more common may make inactivity, poor diet, and being overweight or obese more socially acceptable.

  • The Diminishing Role of Facts in American Public Life

    Jan 17, 2018

    Prof. Jennifer Kavanagh and RAND president Michael Rich write that, without agreement about objective facts and a common understanding of and respect for data and analytical interpretations of those data, it becomes nearly impossible to have the types of meaningful policy debates that form the foundation of democracy.

  • Principals Generally Satisfied with Teach For America Corps Members

    Jan 17, 2018

    Students Amanda Edelman (cohort '13) and Rachel Perera ('16) surveyed principals about Teach For America corps members at their schools. The responses were mostly positive, but the principals did express concern with corps members' classroom management skills and limited two-year commitment.

  • How Federal Policy Could Help Water and Wastewater Utilities

    Jan 16, 2018

    The federal government could address the root causes of infrastructure problems more effectively than just spending money with the hope that it might do some good, write student David Catt (cohort '16) and Prof. Debra Knopman. A better approach might be to devote scarce resources to fixing what actually isn't working well in the nation's approach to managing, funding and financing infrastructure.

  • How to Incentivize Employers to Hire Ex-Offenders

    Jan 15, 2018

    People with criminal records are marginalized in the labor market. Student Lisa Jonsson (cohort '14) and colleagues examine policies that might incentivize employers to hire them. Some options include tax credits and replacement guarantees if an ex-offender proves to be unsuitable once hired.