Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • Newspapers and social media terms in LED display, photos by artisteer/Getty Images and phive2015/Adobe Stock

    Facts vs. Opinions: How the News Is Changing in the Digital Age

    May 14, 2019

    Technology has transformed how people get information. But it has also affected the way that information is produced, shared, and disseminated. Students Steven Davenport (cohort '15), Shawn Smith ('17), and Mahlet Tebeka ('17) worked with professors Jennifer Kavanagh and William Marcellino to investigate how much the presentation of news has actually changed over the last three decades.

  • Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) honor guards at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, April 28, 2019, photo by Parker Song/Reuters

    Getting to Know the Competition

    May 13, 2019

    Americans are facing a new reality in global great power relations that will define the trajectory of U.S. foreign policy for the foreseeable future. Prof. Cortez Cooper argues that understanding China's threat perceptions, while remaining clear-eyed regarding differences in objectives, is essential to developing strategies to deter conflict.

  • College students in silhouette tossing caps in the air, photo by Rawpixel Ltd/Getty Images

    Addressing the College Completion Problem

    May 9, 2019

    More than half of students who enter college end up dropping out without ever completing a degree or certificate. Time and money are wasted without the benefits of a degree. Alum Lindsey Daugherty argues that, while colleges are experimenting with novel techniques to boost completion rates, strategic support from the federal government could further these efforts.

  • dave baiocchi, angela omahoney

    Academics, Diversity, and Mentoring: Staff Transitions, New Positions

    May 3, 2019

    Pardee RAND recently announced three faculty transitions. Angel O'Mahony is the new assistant dean for academic affairs, Tepring Piquado is the new inclusion, diversity, and equity advisor (IDEA), and Dave Baiocchi is a second-year advisor who will help the school develop mentoring programs.

  • Interactive Map Highlights Social and Economic Policy Research Around the World

    Apr 25, 2019

    Pardee RAND students and RAND researchers conduct extensive work and write about social and economic policy issues in nearly every country around the world. An interactive map lists and links to that research by country, making the content more accessible.

  • Moderator Sale Lilly (standing) with panelists Stephanie Herder, Bhaskar Krishnamachari, and Matt Smith, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Blockchain: The Second Decade

    Apr 16, 2019

    Blockchain, which was invented in 2008, is now in its second decade. To help students and alumni understand the implications of this disruptive technology, Career Services welcomed four experts in a discussion of potential commercial and regulatory approaches.

  • Pardee RAND 2018 Commencement Weekend - Saturday commencement ceremony reception, p201806_05e, graduation, commencement, ceremony, reception, gery ryan

    Students, Alumni Thank Gery Ryan

    Apr 12, 2019

    Gery Ryan stepped down in March after more than five years as assistant dean for academic affairs. Students and alumni were quick to express their appreciation for his support of their academic careers and progress. (They are also glad Ryan will continue to teach several courses and offer snacks to office visitors.)

  • Supporters of a "Medicare for All" plan gather on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., September 13, 2017, photo by Yuri Gripas/Reuters

    Spending Estimates Under Medicare for All

    Apr 10, 2019

    Under a Medicare for All plan similar to some proposals being discussed in Congress, alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner calculate that total health expenditures would be an estimated 1.8 percent higher in 2019, relative to the status quo. While this is a small change in national spending, the federal government's health spending would increase substantially, rising by an estimated 221 percent.

  • Used Narcan (naloxone hydrochloride) containers and syringes sit in a case, after paramedics revived a man in his 40s, who was found unresponsive, after overdosing on opioids in Salem, Massachusetts, August 9, 2017, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    (Grey's) Anatomy of an Opioid Crisis

    Apr 8, 2019

    More than 130 Americans die every day after overdosing on opioids. So when one of the most popular shows on network television made opioid misuse a major plotline, alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) and Prof. Sarah MacCarthy paid especially rapt attention to how the show would present this public health crisis. How closely would it mirror reality? Pretty closely, for the narrow slice of the opioid crisis it addressed.

  • A principal meeting with teachers, photo by Claire Holt/The Wallace Foundation

    Principal Pipelines Benefit Students and Reduce Principal Turnover

    Apr 8, 2019

    Six urban districts implemented principal pipelines, a strategic approach to the hiring, preparation, evaluation, and support of school leaders. Student Emilio R. Chavez-Herrerias (cohort '14) found that the efforts were feasible, affordable, and effective. The schools not only outperformed comparison schools in both math and reading, but they also improved principal retention.

  • A medical bill showing balance due, photo by DNY59/Getty Images

    Addressing Surprise Medical Bills Without Raising the Cost of Health Care

    Apr 1, 2019

    Patients who try to stay within their insurers' networks can be hit with surprise bills when they unknowingly receive care from out-of-network physicians. Erin Duffy (cohort '15) and Profs. Chapin White and Mark Friedberg ask how much a physician should be paid for providing a service that is critical but rendered without the patient's ready ability to choose an in-network provider.

  • Petty Officer 1st Class Krystyna Duffy, a boatswain's mate assigned to Coast Guard Station Golden Gate in San Francisco, drives a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat near the Golden Gate Bridge, February 8, 2018, photo by PO3 Sarah Wi/U.S. Coast Guard

    Alum Examines Why Women Leave the Coast Guard, and What Could Encourage Them to Stay

    Mar 29, 2019

    Women leave the Coast Guard at higher rates than men. Through focus groups, alum David Schulker (cohort '07) uncovered concerns about work environment, career issues, and personal life matters. More inclusive personnel policies could help the Coast Guard address these concerns and retain more women.

  • Engineers are using this specially constructed five-story building to study how high-value buildings, such as hospitals and data centers, can remain operational after an earthquake, in San Diego, California, April 17, 2012, photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

    Seismic Safety Upgrades May Cost California Hospitals Billions

    Mar 28, 2019

    David Catt (cohort '16) worked with alum Daniel Waxman ('10) and several professors to estimate the cost to California hospitals of seismic retrofitting. The upgrades could cost between $34 billion and $143 billion statewide, but one-third of hospitals are already in some form of financial distress.

  • Five glasses of water, with dirty water in the center, photo by hdere/Getty Images

    How to Ensure Quality Drinking Water Service for All? One Option Is Fewer Utilities.

    Mar 26, 2019

    California's Human Right to Water Bill declares that “every human being has the right to safe, clean, affordable, and accessible water.” Student David Catt and professors Miriam Marlier and Michelle Miro say one clear barrier to reaching this target is the sheer number of small water utilities that pose service sustainability and public health risks to their customers.

  • Department of Water and Power employees assess the damage from a broken 30-inch water main on Sunset Boulevard, next to the UCLA campus in the Westwood section of Los Angeles, July 30, 2014, photo by Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

    Lessening Leakages: How Water Systems Can Learn From Smart Electric Grids

    Mar 22, 2019

    As drought and population growth place increasing pressure on water supply, the need to save and efficiently manage Southern California's water resources becomes increasingly critical. Student Jalal Awan (cohort 17) and professors Miriam Marlier and Michelle Miro suggest that a single information and communication technology platform could go a long way toward moving water utilities from reactive to proactive maintenance practices.

  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands ahead of their talks at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China, March 21, 2017, photo by Etienne Oliveau/Reuters/Pool

    How Has the Israel-China Relationship Evolved?

    Mar 21, 2019

    Since the early 2000s, relations between China and Israel have expanded in areas like diplomacy, trade, investment, construction, educational partnerships, scientific cooperation, and tourism. Alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) and student Emily Haskel ('16) examine what challenges the relationship poses for Israel and the United States.

  • Oil barrel leaking oil grass, photo by RuslanDashinsky/Getty Images

    Increasing Groundwater Reliance in L.A. County Means Dealing with Extensive Contamination

    Mar 12, 2019

    Advances in the information available on groundwater quality and contamination could help community water systems avoid health hazards and better ensure a safe drinking water supply, write Alexandra Huttinger (cohort '17) and professors Michelle Miro and Miriam Marlier.

  • Los Angeles skyline at night, photo by Joecho-16/Getty Images

    Building a Capacity Framework for U.S. City Diplomacy

    Mar 11, 2019

    As U.S. cities are home to two thirds of the population, the practice of city diplomacy has become essential for local communities to thrive in a globalized society. Sohaela Amiri (cohort '16) asks, What are the necessary skills, capabilities, and resources required to craft an effective global engagement strategy?

  • Pardee RAND Joins Network to Advance Public Interest Technology

    Mar 11, 2019

    Pardee RAND is proud to be a charter member of the Public Interest Technology University Network, a partnership of 21 colleges and universities dedicated to building the nascent field of public interest technology and growing a new generation of civic-minded technologists.

  • An aerial view of the San Francisco Bay delta, photo by Andrei / Adobe Stock

    Decision Support Tool for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Levees Investment Strategy

    Mar 7, 2019

    The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta faces complex and varied flood risks. Possible investments to mitigate these risks are numerous, and they will affect Delta risks differently. A decision support tool developed by alum David Groves (cohort '01) and student James Syme ('18) aided the Delta Stewardship Council in developing a Delta Levees Investment Strategy.

  • Kathryn Bouskill, a social scientist at RAND, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    What the Speed of Life Means for Security and Society

    Mar 6, 2019

    Dozens of technologies with the power to transform human life, from 3D printing to cognitive implants, could become as ordinary as a cellphone by 2040. Prof. Casey Bouskill says society will have to adapt, on the fly, in ways it never has. The speed of life itself could pose a security challenge.

  • Doctor sitting at his desk in his office, photo by SolStock/Getty Images

    Rural Physicians' Perspectives on the Medicare Quality Payment Program

    Mar 5, 2019

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently launched its Quality Payment Program (QPP), which changes how physicians are paid under Medicare. Student Nabeel Qureshi (cohort '18) and colleagues interviewed rural physicians to determine if their practices could successfully participate and how the program could be modified to support small rural practices.

  • Findings Highlights Importance of Leadership

    Mar 5, 2019

    The winter issue of our quarterly newsletter features students and alumni holding lead roles in APPAM, the school taking the lead in reinventing the policy Ph.D., and a new leadership team in Pardee RAND's Development office. Also: a new course in engaging communities in research, and hands-on research exploring the benefits of local air quality data.

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    Course Examines How to Engage Communities in Research

    Mar 4, 2019

    In many research fields, involving community members not only improves the quality of the research but also can increase its ability to result in local change and policy action. A new course this winter helped students acquire the skills to conduct this research.

  • Can Hyperlocal Air Quality Data Improve Policy?

    Mar 1, 2019

    A Tech and Narrative Lab project funded by the Cazier Initiative has brought together a team of Pardee RAND students, faculty, and RAND staff to explore whether having access to easily intelligible localized air quality data promotes better policy and personal decisions.