Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Does the Court System Know as Much About ESI as Your Teenager? It Should.

    Feb 21, 2017

    Electronically stored information (ESI) from smart appliances, fitness trackers, and other devices is making its way into the U.S. court system. Judges and lawyers need to better understand this evidence so they can challenge it or rule on its admissibility in court, writes Prof. Brian Jackson.

  • Community Colleges Can Be 'First Responders' in Retraining Displaced Workers

    Feb 16, 2017

    Many of the occupations with the most career opportunities require two-year degrees or certificates, such as those in health care and technology. Alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05) says community colleges play a key role in training students for these jobs, and offer an environment that is supportive of displaced and dissatisfied workers.

  • Should the Definition of Health Include a Measure of Tolerance?

    Feb 15, 2017

    Involving the medical community in helping to measure and increase tolerance could help make individuals and communities healthier. Since hate is both deadly and contagious, now is the time to engage the medical profession in eradicating it, writes Prof. Robert Brook.

  • Assessment of the Civilian Acquisition Workforce Personnel Demonstration Project

    Feb 15, 2017

    Student Cameron Wright (cohort '12), alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), and professor Laura Werber joined forces with RAND colleagues to assess DoD's AcqDemo, finding several aspects of the program that are performing well but also areas that could be improved.

  • Realizing Autonomous Vehicle Safety

    Feb 14, 2017

    Autonomous vehicles hold enormous promise for transportation safety, said professor Nidhi Kalra in her testimony to Congress. But feasible, sound methods of testing need to be developed. In the meantime, policymakers should work to foster the development of self-driving vehicles while lowering their risks.

  • Trends in Inequality and the World's Eight Richest Men

    Feb 10, 2017

    While Oxfam reports have done a good job of bringing attention to the problem of inequality, they may give the false impression that global inequality has been rising instead of falling, writes Prof. Ernesto Amaral. Global inequality has actually been on the decline while inequality within the developed world is increasing.

  • Mattis' Mission in Asia

    Feb 6, 2017

    U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis made his first overseas trip this week, visiting Japan and South Korea. Prof. Scott Harold says Mattis reassured them that U.S. alliances in East Asia will remain strong, while also clarifying Washington's expectations.

  • How to Counter Transnational Criminal Networks

    Jan 27, 2017

    Transnational criminal networks have expanded their global reach. In some cases, they have even converged with terrorist groups. Research by alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) and RAND colleagues examines how these networks threaten U.S. interests and what can be done to combat them.

  • What 32 Million Tweets Tell Us About Health and the Twitterverse

    Jan 26, 2017

    Health-related posts and conversations on Twitter shed light on the public's views on obesity, exercise and fitness, safe sex, alcohol, and mental health. Prof. Douglas Yeung asks, will such discussion increase in communities where health and wellness programs are put in place?

  • Helping Soldiers Use Army Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities in Civilian Jobs

    Jan 24, 2017

    Some veterans struggle to find jobs after they leave the Army. Alum Michael Shanley (cohort '79) helped to identify a broad range of high-quality civilian jobs that match Army KSAs.

  • China Stressed a Growing Interest in Global Trade and Governance at Davos

    Jan 24, 2017

    President Xi Jinping became the first Chinese leader to appear at the annual gathering of the World Economic Forum last week. He gave a keynote speech that defended global trade and criticized protectionism. Prof. Timothy Heath says his speech reflected, in part, the reality that China has profited enormously from decades of globalization.

  • Oregon's Options for Financing Health Care

    Jan 19, 2017

    Federal health care reform had just begun in 2013 when Oregon authorized a study to improve how the state pays for health care. A comparison of the projected impacts and feasibility of four options—developed by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), professors Chapin White and Christine Eibner, and several RAND colleagues—can help Oregon's stakeholders choose the option that best suits their needs.

  • Taking Stock of the U.S. Rebalance and the Contest for Influence in Asia

    Jan 19, 2017

    Since 2011, the U.S. has carried out measures designed to bolster its influence in Asia, a region that is projected to play a central role in driving global economic growth. Prof. Timothy Heath writes that, despite steady progress, with increased diplomatic outreach to China and its neighbors, doubts about the U.S. pivot to Asia have persisted.

  • No Company Should Be Able to Keep You from Checking Your Government's Math

    Jan 18, 2017

    Data and computer models are becoming more and more important for making policy decisions on everything from prison sentences to tax bills. Prof. Brian Jackson argues that citizens should be able to “check the math” on decisions that affect them.

  • Trump's Marijuana Options

    Jan 17, 2017

    The new administration will have at least six options for addressing marijuana — they are not mutually exclusive and each comes with tradeoffs, writes Prof. Beau Kilmer. Importantly, they are all compatible with a federal approach that encourages and supports discussions about marijuana prohibition and its alternatives.

  • The Wrong Terrorism Narrative

    Jan 15, 2017

    Solving the problem of homegrown terrorism in the U.S. requires understanding the true nature of the complex problem of violent extremism. Prof. Henry Willis says that, with such knowledge, authorities and communities will be better able to develop strategies to prevent the next tragic terrorist killing.

  • Faculty Leaders Program Applications Now Being Accepted

    Jan 12, 2017

    Want to up your game in policy analysis? Learn more about the Pardee RAND Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development program to augment your existing teaching and research. Applications are being accepted through March 15.

  • Improving MACRA's Chances of Success

    Jan 9, 2017

    Starting in 2019, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act will integrate and potentially simplify performance measurement by combining a number of measures and programs. Research on performance measurement provides a good deal of insight on how to avoid several pitfalls in MACRA's rollout, writes prof. Peter Hussey.

  • Trump Should Confront Kim Over ICBM Tests

    Jan 6, 2017

    Whether successful or not, an ICBM test by North Korea would be very much against U.S. interests and President-elect Trump should act to counter it as early as possible. A turn to the basics of deterrence would be the path most likely to succeed, writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75).

  • Improving HIV and Mental Health Care in Uganda

    Jan 5, 2017

    A small team of RAND researchers, including two Pardee RAND professors, has spent years working with local clinics in Uganda to help people not just survive HIV, but learn to live with it, and even thrive.

  • Can a Continuous Coverage Requirement Produce a Healthy Insurance Market?

    Jan 4, 2017

    A continuous coverage requirement is intended to discourage individuals from waiting until they become sick to purchase insurance. Student Erin Duffy (cohort '15) says such a requirement works well in theory to maintain a healthy marketplace, but there is little evidence on how well it might work in practice.

  • Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Service Members

    Jan 4, 2017

    Prescription drug misuse is of critical concern for the military because of its potential impact on the health and well-being of personnel, military readiness, and associated health care costs. Alumni Janice Blanchard (cohort '98) and Jennifer Walters (cohort '11) worked with RAND colleagues to offer ideas for addressing the problem.

  • RAND Celebrates Alum Rick Fallon's Career

    Jan 4, 2017

    Pardee RAND alum Rick Fallon (cohort '75) retired from RAND in January 2017 after two decades of service. As CFO and VP of Finance & Administration, Fallon worked on critical business decisions, performance measures, and initiatives that have increased the agility of RAND's operations.

  • Uncertainty Ahead: Defense Technology and Acquisition Trends in 2017

    Jan 3, 2017

    Prof. Cynthia Cook writes that the change in administration, coupled with the new management structure being imposed by Congress on the Department of Defense's acquisition enterprise, is creating a shifting and unpredictable landscape for 2017.

  • Walking Away from One-China Policy Imperils Taiwan

    Dec 22, 2016

    The U.S. One-China policy has helped keep the peace for decades. Abandoning it now could result in stiffer Chinese resolve. Such a strategy may even backfire by triggering an otherwise avoidable crisis, writes prof. Michael Chase.