Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news and announcements; here we present a complete compilation of ALL the news that's fit to share.

  • 2019 Faculty Leaders Program participants, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Pardee RAND Welcomes New Cohort of Faculty Leaders

    Jul 22, 2019

    Educators from 15 universities are on campus this week for Pardee RAND's seventh annual Faculty Leaders Program, a week-long policy analysis intensive that arms attendees with new tools to effect change in their communities and to inspire their students to consider careers and advanced study in public policy analysis.

  • Elderly couple looking at sticky notes on a wall, photo by MonicaNinker/Getty Images

    Is Canada Prepared to Meet Demand for Alzheimer's Treatment?

    Jul 18, 2019

    If a treatment to slow the progression of Alzheimer's became available in 2021, hundreds of thousands of patients in Canada could progress to Alzheimer's dementia while on wait lists unless health care capacity is increased. Student Sangita Baxi (cohort '17) and alumni Jodi Liu ('12) and Jakub Hlavka ('14) explore challenges and suggest potential solutions.

  • Newborn hand holding the finger of an adult hand, photo by deng qiufeng/Getty Images

    Improving the Child Welfare System to Respond to the Needs of Substance-Exposed Infants

    Jul 17, 2019

    To realize the gains envisioned by recent legislation, alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) says the Administration and Congress should prioritize additional funding to modernize our child welfare system to meet the unique needs of families affected by substance misuse.

  • Smart car 3D rendering, photo by Production Perig/Adobe Stock

    When an Autonomous Vehicle Is Hacked, Who Is Liable?

    Jul 12, 2019

    Hacks on autonomous vehicles could lead to deaths, property destruction, ransomware attacks, or data theft. Maya Buenaventura and Pavan Katkar (both cohort '14) worked with RAND colleagues to explore several scenarios that illustrate the policy challenges facing the civil legal system, insurers, and others.

  • Equations and formulas behind scales of justice, images by monsitj and DNY59/Getty Images

    Addressing the Challenges of Algorithmic Equity

    Jul 11, 2019

    Social institutions increasingly use algorithms for decisionmaking purposes. Luke Irwin (cohort 16) and colleagues explored how different perspectives on equity or fairness inform the use of algorithms in the context of auto insurance pricing, job recruitment, and criminal justice.

  • People play Pokémon Go at El Olivar park in the San Isidro district of Lima, Peru, September 2, 2016, photo by Mariana Bazo/Reuters

    Augmented Reality on the Playground

    Jul 10, 2019

    As children's screen time increases, their time spent outdoors decreases. Prof. Deborah Cohen asks, how might new technologies merge with nature to help kids get outside and be more active?

  • Arthur Brooks, author and Pardee RAND alumnus, discussing his new book at RAND's headquarters in Santa Monica, California, May 17, 2019, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Alum Arthur Brooks Tells Americans to Answer Hate with Love

    Jul 8, 2019

    Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) spoke at a RAND event to discuss his new book, Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt. He stressed that we don't have to disagree less, but we do have to disagree better.

  • A teacher helping students draw with colored pencils, photo by Jack F/Adobe Stock

    Do Educators Have What They Need to Teach Students with Disabilities?

    Jun 27, 2019

    To serve students with high-incidence disabilities, teachers need a supportive school culture, collaboration and planning time, resources and training, access to data, and tools for using data. Rachel Perera (cohort '16) and colleagues analyzed survey data that sheds light on the extent to which these supports are available to general and special educators in U.S. schools.

  • Australia technology of internet of things IOT big data cloud computing, conceptual 3D render by immimagery/AdobeStock

    Designing a Capability Development Framework for Australian Home Affairs

    Jun 24, 2019

    Australia's Department of Home Affairs is responsible for domestic security, law enforcement, migration, and the movement of goods across Australia’s borders. Alum Jon Wong (cohort '12) and colleagues analyzed which capability development lifecycle management framework best suits the department's needs for an enterprise-level approach to investment decisions.

  • NATO flag against a background of binary numbers, photo by robsonphoto/Adobe Stock

    Cyberspace as a Military Domain: Lessons for NATO

    Jun 20, 2019

    In 2016, NATO identified cyberspace as a new operational domain. Bilyana Lilly (cohort '16) and RAND colleagues asked what steps the alliance has taken since then to bolster its cyber capabilities and what are the greatest challenges that still lie ahead.

  • p201702_01, lecture, breakfast, briefing, event, susan marquis, martin feldstein

    In Remembrance: Martin Feldstein, Pardee RAND Distinguished Visitor

    Jun 19, 2019

    Martin Feldstein passed away in June 2019 at the age of 79, and was a distinguished visitor and frequent Pardee RAND speaker.

  • Magnifying glass and pen atop pages of graphs

    Reviewing Funding Formulas for State Grants

    Jun 19, 2019

    Students Meg Chamberlin (cohort '14) and Nima Shahidinia ('16) worked with RAND researchers to analyze the formulas for distributing funds to states under three block grants for services related to mental health, substance abuse, and homelessness (unchanged since 1992), to determine whether they should be modified.

  • A row of lockers in a high school, photo by Monkey Business Images/Getty Images

    Secondary Educators Consider Discipline Reform a Priority

    Jun 13, 2019

    One quarter of principals and 31 percent of teachers surveyed identified discipline reform as one of the top three most important interventions needed in their secondary schools, according to research by Rachel Perera (cohort '16). Principals and teachers in high-poverty schools were more likely than those in low-poverty schools to do so.

  • Picture of a crowd of people holding and raising rainbow flags during an LGBT parade, photo by BalkansCat.

    Sexual Minority Disparities in Opioid Misuse

    Jun 12, 2019

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults, particularly bisexual women, are at significantly higher risk than heterosexuals for prescription opioid misuse and heroin use, according to research by alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). Disparities in rates of opioid misuse among LGB adults are concerning given elevated risks of overdose.

  • College student using a laptop, photo by jacoblund/Getty Images

    Federal Policy Might Encourage Innovation to Cut the Cost of College

    Jun 5, 2019

    A big factor in the rise of college costs is the traditional seat-time model requiring undergraduate students to spend a specified amount of time in classrooms, frequently with doctorally qualified faculty. Prof. Charles Goldman argues that alternative models such as online education could enable colleges and universities to offer degrees more efficiently and affordably.

  • Findings Highlights Donors, Scholars, and Transitions

    Jun 5, 2019

    The spring issue of our quarterly newsletter showcases the many ways we support our students, alumni, and faculty. From scholarships to mentoring, and networking opportunities to continuing education — even summer reading recommendations for fun and personal development — Pardee RAND has it all.

  • A homeless man in southern California, photo by ArtyAlison/Getty Images

    Local Effort Reduces Homelessness and Use of City Services

    Jun 5, 2019

    A program that provided people experiencing chronic homelessness with housing, health care, and other services helped them get off the streets and reduced spending on public services, such as emergency medical care. Student Karishma Patel (cohort '17) helped to evaluate the program.

  • An illustration of a human's moral compass, image by Trifonov_Evgeniy/Getty Images

    Ethics in Scientific Research

    Jun 5, 2019

    An analysis by student Carlos Ignacio Gutierrez (cohort '13), Prof. Tepring Piquado, and several RAND colleagues examines how ethics are created, monitored, and enforced, finds which ethical principles are common across scientific disciplines, explores how these ethics might vary geographically, and discusses how emerging topics are shaping future ethics.

  • Professors Reflect on Brown Faculty Chair Residencies

    Jun 3, 2019

    Jeffrey Wasserman, Malcolm Williams, and Tepring Piquado each spent a month in residence at Pardee RAND this academic year, meeting with and mentoring students both in academic settings and through social activities. They reflected on their experiences afterwards.

  • Inaugural Brunch Honors Donors and Scholars

    May 20, 2019

    Dean Susan Marquis and RAND president and CEO Michael Rich hosted an inaugural brunch in May to recognize scholarship and dissertation award recipients and to celebrate the philanthropic supporters whose generosity has helped make their education possible.

  • Close-up of a person reading/texting on their smartphone, photo by sam thomas/Getty Images

    Three Takeaways from RAND's Analysis of News in the Digital Age

    May 14, 2019

    How has the rise of digital technology shaped the way that news is presented? Student Mahlet Tebeka (cohort '17), alum Steve Davenport ('15), and professors Jennifer Kavanagh and Bill Marcellino conducted an empirical study to find out. Here's what you need to know from their findings.

  • Newspapers and social media terms in LED display, photos by artisteer/Getty Images and phive2015/Adobe Stock

    Facts vs. Opinions: How the News Is Changing in the Digital Age

    May 14, 2019

    Technology has transformed how people get information. But it has also affected the way that information is produced, shared, and disseminated. Students Steven Davenport (cohort '15), Shawn Smith ('17), and Mahlet Tebeka ('17) worked with professors Jennifer Kavanagh and William Marcellino to investigate how much the presentation of news has actually changed over the last three decades.

  • Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) honor guards at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, April 28, 2019, photo by Parker Song/Reuters

    Getting to Know the Competition

    May 13, 2019

    Americans are facing a new reality in global great power relations that will define the trajectory of U.S. foreign policy for the foreseeable future. Prof. Cortez Cooper argues that understanding China's threat perceptions, while remaining clear-eyed regarding differences in objectives, is essential to developing strategies to deter conflict.

  • College students in silhouette tossing caps in the air, photo by Rawpixel Ltd/Getty Images

    Addressing the College Completion Problem

    May 9, 2019

    More than half of students who enter college end up dropping out without ever completing a degree or certificate. Time and money are wasted without the benefits of a degree. Alum Lindsey Daugherty argues that, while colleges are experimenting with novel techniques to boost completion rates, strategic support from the federal government could further these efforts.

  • dave baiocchi, angela omahoney

    Academics, Diversity, and Mentoring: Staff Transitions, New Positions

    May 3, 2019

    Pardee RAND recently announced three faculty transitions. Angel O'Mahony is the new assistant dean for academic affairs, Tepring Piquado is the new inclusion, diversity, and equity advisor (IDEA), and Dave Baiocchi is a second-year advisor who will help the school develop mentoring programs.