Blog Posts by Pardee RAND Faculty

  • Oscar-winning actress Jennifer Lawrence has contacted authorities to investigate who stole and posted nude images of her online, part of a reported mass hacking of celebrities' intimate photos

    Hackerazzi: How Naked Celebrities Might Make the Cloud Safer

    Sep 8, 2014

    Lillian Ablon

    Despite data breach after data breach that lays bare the personal information of millions of people, leading to only incremental changes by the hacked company, it seems it only takes a handful of celebrity nude selfies to bring issues like cloud security and multi-factor authentication to the fore causing immediate changes, writes Professor Lillian Ablon.

  • Yes and no boxes on a clipboard

    If You Want Ex-Cons to Be 'Productive Members of Society,' Ban the Box

    When an inmate is released, you often hear Americans say that he's “paid his debt” and can now become “a productive member of society.” But, Professor Lois Davis writes, the reality is ex-cons pay for their crimes long after sentences end. On the outside, the stigma of incarceration makes it extremely difficult to land a job.

  • A Pro-Russian separatist stands near the damaged war memorial at Savur-Mohyla, east of the city of Donetsk, Ukraine

    A Dispatch from the Ukrainian Front

    If Putin sought advice about what NATO is thinking, his Russian Western Front Military commander might say that given its current political indecisiveness and lack of military readiness, NATO lacks the capability to launch a credible intervention, but they should watch for changes in the alliance posture, writes Professor Terrence Kelly.

  • Members of Kurdish Peshmerga force stand guard at Sulaiman Pek front line, August 31, 2014. Iraqi security forces backed by Shi'ite militias on Sunday broke the two-month siege of Amerli by Islamic State militants.

    A Broad Approach to Countering the Islamic State

    Recent analysis about how to defeat the Islamic State tends to be based on no more than intuition, a general sense of history, or a small number of cases of questionable comparability. A study of 71 historical cases of counterinsurgencies by Professor Chris Paul and colleagues should help provide empirical evidence to this important debate.

  • U.S. currency wrapped around prescription bottle

    The Winding Path to Effective Bundled Payment

    It's not unusual for a demonstration to fall short of its original objectives, writes Professor Peter Hussey. Learning from such cases is part of the innovation process. This is especially worthwhile for bundled payment, which has many potential benefits for patients, providers, and payers.

  • People walk along the street soon after, what locals say, was recent shelling by Ukrainian forces, in Donetsk on August 20, 2014

    Make Russia an Offer on Ukraine It Can't Refuse

    An international initiative that does not appear to emanate from NATO or the EU could help bring Russia to the table, in part by accepting that Moscow, too, has a role. Professor Keith Crane writes, an international peacekeeping force could open the way for a negotiated end to the conflict.

  • Food court signs in Las Vegas

    Always Hungry? Here's the Real Reason Why

    The problem of obesity cannot be attributed to a single dietary or physiological factor, like too much sugar, too much fat, or even factors like viruses, bacteria, and endocrine disrupters. Professor Deborah Cohen says the real problem is that Americans now live in a food swamp and there is just too much food easily available.

  • Displaced people from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing violence from the Islamic State, walk towards the Syrian border, on the outskirts of Sinjar mountain, August 11, 2014

    What's Going on in Iraq?

    Aug 14, 2014

    Karl P. Mueller

    While the United States could embark on a much wider war in Iraq, there's little reason to think it will rush to do so or that using airpower to help defend the Kurds will make such an escalation inevitable, writes Professor Karl Mueller.

  • Pickpocket stealing a woman's wallet

    The Silicon Valley Tech Industry Can Help Crime Victims

    Aug 11, 2014

    Nelson Lim

    A broader approach is needed to better address the needs of millions of American victims of crimes like sexual assault, family violence, financial exploitation, gun violence, identity theft, burglary and stalking. And that's where Silicon Valley's tech community can step up, writes Professor Nelson Lim.

  • Stethoscope on woman's chest

    Should You Get Screened for Heart Disease?

    Many think of cardiovascular disease (CVD) primarily as a male problem, writes Professor Chloe Bird. But one in three adult women has some form of CVD, which has killed more American women than men every year since 1984. Cardiovascular risk assessments can help women understand their current risk and health behaviors.

  • Shi'ite volunteers, who've joined the Iraqi army against militants from the radical Islamic State, take part in weapons training, July 18, 2014

    Defeating the Islamic State: Crafting a Regional Approach

    While ISIL may achieve temporary tactical gains from declaring the caliphate, it made the strategic error of declaring all other Sunni political actors illegitimate, writes Professor Terrence Kelly. This may provide an opening to build a coalition that can create and implement a regional strategy to attack ISIL.

  • Woman sitting at a desk looking at her watch

    "I'm Too Busy for Exercise...I Just Don't Have the Time."

    As hard as it can be to make time for exercise, failing to do so isn't a time-saver, writes Professor Chloe Bird. It might seem so for a day or two, but you will feel the result of not exercising in the reductions in your energy, ability to focus and cope, and in your quality of sleep.

  • Detainees sleep in a holding cell at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility, June 18, 2014

    With Child Migrants Set to Become Students, Educators Must Prepare

    Between 70,000 and 90,000 unaccompanied children are expected to cross the U.S.-Mexico border by year's end, writes Professor Robert Bozick. Lost in an intensifying debate over U.S. immigration policy is the possibility that this wave will spill from shelters to schools. To best respond to this reality, policymakers and educators should consider what research says about educating migrant children.

  • Employees stock their shelves with 2-gram packages of marijuana at Cannabis City during the first day of legal retail marijuana sales in Seattle, Washington July 8, 2014

    Taking a Sober Look at Legalizing Marijuana

    California and a handful of other states will probably vote on legal pot in 2016. Whether it passes will depend on the quality of the proposal, how much money is involved in the campaigns, and how things play out in Colorado, Washington, and other places that have legalized production and sales, writes Professor Beau Kilmer.

  • Young woman texting in car

    What if Distracted Driving Was Safe?

    According to consumer research, the ability to consume media, write an email, or even sleep during transport is a key selling point for self-driving cars, which could be available in the near future. Autonomous vehicle technology could also produce a wide range of public benefits, writes Professor James Anderson.

  • Mehdi Army fighters loyal to a Shi'ite cleric march during a military-style training in Najaf, June 18, 2014

    A Long-Term Strategy for a Democratic Iraq

    Jun 30, 2014

    Ben Connable

    Unfortunately, no strategic option for a unified, democratic Iraq has a good chance of success. But any well-considered option that doesn't involve ineffective killing or risking U.S. lives is preferable to simply allowing Iraq to disintegrate and feed broader regional instability, writes Professor Ben Connable.

  • EPA administrator Gina McCarthy announces steps under the Clean Air Act to cut carbon pollution from power plants during a news conference on June 2, 2014

    New Coal Plant Rules Need Sustained Support to Succeed

    Stopping climate change will require the U.S. and the rest of the world to virtually eliminate emissions over the course of the 21st century, write Professors Rob Lempert and Steven Popper. Getting anywhere close to zero emissions demands sustained political and public support, driven by an energy production sector given enough incentives.

  • Man proposing to a surprised woman with a ring

    Are Youth Putting Off Marriage Because of Their Student Loan Debt?

    Jun 26, 2014

    Robert Bozick

    Women with higher loan balances may be less likely to get married than their peers with lower or no loan balances. But as time goes on, Professor Robert Bozick notes, young adults adjust to their post-college financial situation and eventually get promotions, earn raises, obtain other assets, and get married.

  • two firemen responding to an emergency

    An Enduring Need for Better Measures of Emergency Preparedness

    Jun 25, 2014

    Brian A. Jackson

    In an era of fiscal austerity, the need for measurement and assessment becomes manifold, writes Professor Brian Jackson. Tied to good government goals and responsible stewardship of public funds, measurements are also necessary to educate the public about what it should—and should not—reasonably expect when disaster strikes.

  • Northrop Grumman test pilots with arm-mounted controllers after successfully launching a drone combat aircraft on the USS George H. W. Bush, May 14, 2013

    Will U.S. Air Power Work in Iraq?

    Jun 18, 2014

    Karl P. Mueller

    There are many key questions regarding deployment of U.S. air power to Iraq to halt the progress of the Islamic State. Professor Karl Mueller asks, how effective would it be? Would it cause a lot of civilian casualties? Is air power alone enough to achieve U.S. objectives?

  • A child receives polio vaccination during an anti-polio campaign on the outskirts of Jalalabad, Afghanistan

    An Outbreak of Outbreaks

    Jun 11, 2014

    Melinda Moore, Andrew M. Parker, et al.

    Lately, stories about outbreaks seem to be spreading faster than the diseases themselves, writes Professor Melinda Moore. An outbreak of measles in Ohio is just part of an 18-year high of U.S. cases. Meanwhile, polio continues to circulate in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nigeria, while spreading to other countries.

  • Benjamin Lesczynski, 8, of New York, takes a sip of a "Big Gulp" while protesting the proposed "soda ban" suggested by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, July 9, 2012

    Let's Regulate Food Like We Do Alcohol

    To help people avoid overeating, Professor Deborah Cohen says the kinds of policies effective in controlling alcohol consumption should be applied to food—standardizing portion sizes, limiting impulse marketing and reducing the convenience and salience of foods most closely associated with obesity and chronic diseases.

  • A computer-generated image of objects in Earth orbit that are currently being tracked, 95% of which is orbital debris

    Debris Poses Increased Threat to Exploration

    Every satellite launch and maneuver is carefully coordinated because some orbits are strewn with the space-based equivalent of blown tires, abandoned vehicles, loose gravel and, of course, other traffic. Earth's orbit is littered with hundreds of thousands of debris objects, write Professors Bill Welser and Dave Baiocchi.

  • 415 Superscooper aircraft

    Fighting Fires From Above

    A newly deployed airborne firefighting resource is helping the United States Forest Service (USFS) battle wildfires, while at the same time providing valuable lessons on the utility and cost effectiveness of water-dropping scooper aircraft, writes Professor Edward Keating.

  • a worried-looking woman paying for her prescription at a pharmacy

    What Drives the Market for Orphan Drugs?

    May 14, 2014

    Susan M. Gates

    The 1983 Orphan Drug Act appears to be successful in promoting development of new treatments for relatively rare conditions. But an unintended consequence of its success is the high cost of specialty drugs, writes Pardee RAND professor Susan Gates.