Blog Posts by Pardee RAND Faculty

  • People work out at an outdoor exercise area at Macombs Dam Park in the Bronx, New York City, September 13, 2012

    Putting Health into the Health Care Debate

    Dec 10, 2016

    Jeffrey Wasserman

    How much return is the United States getting for spending over 17 percent of its gross domestic product on health care? Not nearly enough, says professor and alum Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85), vice president and director of RAND Health. The health care debate should focus on improving population health and ensuring the country is getting the biggest bang for its bucks.

  • Digital silhouettes of people

    How to Rethink Data Privacy

    Society benefits from the exchange of large-scale data in many ways. Anonymization is the usual mechanism for addressing the privacy of data subjects. Unfortunately, according to professors Osonde Osoba and John Davis, anonymization is broken.

  • Sailors and members of the Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station clear ice from the hatch of the Seawolf-class submarine USS Connecticut in the Arctic Ocean, March 19, 2011

    How to Be Safer in the Arctic

    The Arctic is more accessible than it once was, but it's still a formidable place to travel. An emergency involving a cruise ship or a downed plane could stress the search-and-rescue system. But modest investments and planning measures can make a big difference, write alum Timothy Smith (cohort '13) and prof. Abbie Tingstad.

  • An Australia Post drone is pictured during a delivery trial in Melbourne, April 15, 2016

    How to Prevent Drones Colliding in Crowded Skies

    Sep 14, 2016

    Kenneth Kuhn, William Welser IV, et al.

    The federal government should work with private firms to develop drone traffic management systems and test drone designs, write professors Kenneth Kuhn, William Welser, and Jia Xu. This could help stimulate the development of drone aviation. It could also help modernize the air traffic control system.

  • Federal Reserve Building in Washington, D.C.

    Central Bank Perversity: The Downside to Aggressive Monetary Policy

    Sep 13, 2016

    Charles Wolf, Jr.

    Aggressive monetary policy has negative effects on retirees, on income inequality, and on market stability—both domestically and globally—writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • A grower holds a plant for sale at the medical marijuana farmers market at the California Heritage Market in Los Angeles, California, July 11, 2014

    Your Questions About Marijuana Legalization, Answered

    Sep 13, 2016

    At least five states will vote on legal recreational marijuana this November. Drug policy expert and Pardee RAND professor Beau Kilmer hosted an “Ask Me Anything” session on Reddit to shed light on this and other issues.

  • Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock

    How 'Star Trek' Inspired a Boy to Become a Scientist

    Aug 26, 2016

    William Marcellino

    Prof. William Marcellino discusses how “Star Trek” convinced him at an early age that science and the advancement of human knowledge could make the world a better place.

  • Guo Shengkun, China's Minister of Public Security, speaks during the Second U.S.-China High-Level Joint Dialogue on Cybercrime and Related Issues in Beijing, China, June 14, 2016

    The U.S.-China Cyber Agreement: A Good First Step

    China's apparent compliance with the cyber agreement might represent little more than a temporary shift in tactics. Prof. Scott Harold says the U.S. should make clear that indictments may once again be sought if Chinese hackers resume cyber espionage against U.S. firms.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin arrives for a personal send-off for members of the Russian Olympic team at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, July 27, 2016

    How to Counter Putin's Subversive War on the West

    Russian cybercrime, Olympics doping, and other active measures have one thing in common: Moscow admits no wrongdoing. These scandals exacerbate the frigid relations between Moscow and the West. Diplomacy sometimes works slowly, but it helps, writes prof. Martin Libicki.

  • Three college students walking to class

    The High Cost of Free College

    Aug 1, 2016

    Trey Miller

    Subsidies may make institutions inclined to raise tuition since the government would foot the bill. One way to address this issue, writes prof. Trey Miller, is to develop and implement policies that encourage greater productivity from higher education institutions.

  • The interior of a Tesla Model S is shown in autopilot mode in San Francisco, California, April 7, 2016

    Fatal Crash Shouldn't Kill Self-Driving Cars

    Jul 16, 2016

    Nidhi Kalra

    The first known fatality in an autonomous vehicle occurred on May 7 and raises important questions. It does not, however, mean that self-driving cars are less safe than human drivers or that development of the technology should be stopped, writes Prof. Nidhi Kalra.

  • A police officer holds a pen and conducts a field sobriety test on a motorist

    Should Some Californians Lose Their 'License to Drink'?

    In California, many efforts to reduce repeat drunken driving focus on the driving. Prof. Beau Kilmer asks, What if the state targeted the “drunk” aspect instead?

  • A nurse prepares a man to donate blood

    Revisiting Restrictions on Blood Donations from Gay and Bisexual Men

    Jul 5, 2016

    Sarah MacCarthy

    The FDA does not accept blood from male donors who have had sex with a man in the previous 12 months. This has led to an ongoing debate about whether this restriction is supported by scientific evidence or, as some have argued, related to lingering stigma and discrimination related to HIV/AIDS, writes Prof. Sarah MacCarthy.

  • A British flag flutters in front of a window in London, Britain, June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU BREXIT referendum.

    Grasping the Brexit Moment for Free Trade

    The United Kingdom's surprising vote to exit the EU turned another tricky day into a possible social crisis. But where there is crisis, there is also opportunity, and the vote presents an opening for another step forward of global trade and investment liberalization, writes Prof. Howard Shatz.

  • The aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis approaches the fast combat support ship USNS Rainier during a replenishment at sea in the South China Sea, March 4, 2016

    South China Sea Spat a Symptom of U.S.-China Jockeying for Advantage

    Jun 27, 2016

    Timothy R. Heath

    A spate of high-profile diplomatic feuds and military actions related to the South China Sea has raised concern about the direction of U.S.-China relations. Neither country is well-positioned politically or economically to engage in a long-term, antagonistic relationship, let alone a major conflict, writes Prof. Timothy Heath.

  • Boys study with a shared book at their school in a village outside Sanaa, Yemen, February 2, 2016

    Countering Extremism: Early Childhood Education Forgotten

    Global attention has turned to education as a way to counter extremism, but what has been missing from these conversations is a focus on learning in children's first years, when much brain development occurs, writes Prof. Rita Karam. In the Middle East and North Africa, government underinvestment in formal programs for young children is the norm.

  • A man is seen next to signs of Chinese yuan and U.S. dollar at a foreign exchange store in Shanghai, January 8, 2016

    China's Yuan as a Reserve Currency: Boon or Bane for the Dollar?

    Establishing a system in which two reserve currencies compete with each other to affect global decisions about reserve holdings may lead to greater financial stability than the present dollar-dominated system, writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • Brazilian Army soldiers take part in a simulation of decontamination of multiple victims during a training against chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear attacks ahead of the 2016 Rio Olympics, March 11, 2016

    ISIS and Dirty Bombs

    Jun 3, 2016

    Gregory S. Jones

    There has been growing concern that terrorists might use radiological sources to create a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). Prof. Gregory Jones explains that calculations have shown that an attack would be unlikely to produce radioactive contamination sufficient to kill or even injure anyone, but there would be psychological and economic effects.

  • Chefs Daniel Patterson (left) and Roy Choi (center) celebrate during a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the restaurant Locol in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California

    Good (Fast) Food as a Vehicle for Social Change

    Neighborhood by neighborhood, a few dozen jobs at a time, two celebrity chefs are tackling complex and persistent public policy problems. They could succeed in their own way in communities where generations of government programs and charity have had limited impact, writes Dean Susan Marquis.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama attends a press conference with Vietnam's President Tran Dai Quang at the Presidential Palace Compound in Hanoi, Vietnam, May 23, 2016

    Why Has Obama Lifted the Arms Sales Ban on Vietnam?

    The lifting of the Vietnam arms embargo needs to be understood as part of the long process of normalizing relations with a former U.S. enemy and building toward a more cooperative, economically dynamic, and strategic future-oriented relationship, writes Prof. Scott Harold.

  • Veterans waiting for their appointments at the VA Medical Center in El Paso, Texas

    Did We Improve Veterans Health Care? It's Unclear

    The Veterans Choice program was designed to expedite veterans' access to health care and relieve pressure on the VA system. Before making the program permanent, writes Prof. Susan Hosek, the VA should better understand its effectiveness.

  • Doves fly over the Peace Memorial Park with a view of the gutted A-bomb dome at a ceremony in Hiroshima, Japan

    5 Things That Should Happen When Obama Visits Hiroshima

    On May 27, President Barack Obama will be the first sitting U.S. president to visit the city of Hiroshima. As Prof. Scott Harold writes, the visit is a sign of respect and friendship between the American and Japanese people, and should make the two countries' ties even stronger.

  •  Graduates wearing caps and gowns

    Making the 'Gap Year' More Inclusive and Purposeful

    May 19, 2016

    Louay Constant

    High schools and universities should work together, with the support of policymakers, to develop programs that would provide a wider spectrum of U.S. students with the opportunity to take a purposeful gap year—and enter college with some real-world adult experience behind them, writes Prof. Louay Constant.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong-un presides over a rally and parade in Pyongyang's main ceremonial square, North Korea, May 10, 2016

    Behind North Korea's Bid for a 'Peace Treaty'

    By insisting on a peace treaty with America, North Korea is probably seeking war, writes professor and alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75). Its leaders likely hope a treaty would lead to a withdrawal of U.S. forces from South Korea, setting the stage for an invasion by the North.

  • High school student talking to a teacher near lockers

    The Hidden Costs of Pension Plan Reform

    While there are many policy options that may decrease pension liabilities for Chicago and cities and states in similar situations, writes Prof. Jim Hosek, some options being considered may also have serious consequences for the public sector workforce, now and in the future.