Alumni News & Announcements

  • Detroit police line up next to an armored vehicle following a rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Detroit, Michigan, June 1, 2020, photo by Rebecca Cook/Reuters

    Alum: How to Reform Military Gear Transfers to Police

    Jul 13, 2020

    Police officers equipped like soldiers have appeared on the streets of American cities amid recent protests over George Floyd's killing. Alum Jack Riley (cohort '88) asks, how should lawmakers reform a program that makes use of excess equipment and is popular with police departments, but that also raises substantial concerns about the militarization of policing?

  • An Airman with the 238th Air Support Operations Squadron prepares for a close air support exercise during Southern Strike 2020 at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, MS,  February 3, 2020, photo by Staff Sgt. Izabella Workman/U.S. Air Force

    Book Review: 'The Kill Chain: Defending America in the Future of High-Tech Warfare' by Christian Brose

    Jul 2, 2020

    As the Pentagon and commercial technologists continue to explore the potential of commercial technologies for the military and work towards greater adoption, Alum Jon Wong (cohort '12) says they may wish to focus not only on lowering bureaucratic barriers but also on managing expectations about what technologies will be most beneficial and how they will be used.

  • A radio telescope in front of a field of stars

    Alums Suggest Opportunities for Including Information Environment in USMC Wargames

    Jul 1, 2020

    Research by alumnae Yuna Wong (cohort '00) and Ellie Bartels ('15) finds wargaming is enjoying renewed prominence in the defense community, but the information environment remains underdeveloped and underrepresented in U.S. Marine Corps wargames.

  • A woman blowing into a breath monitor, photo by aijohn784/Getty Images

    Revoking the 'License to Drink': Emerging Evidence on Mandatory Sobriety

    Jun 29, 2020

    After counties in South Dakota implemented a 24/7 sobriety program, repeat arrests for impaired driving decreased in the counties by an average of 12%. North Dakota implemented a similar program and also saw decreases in impaired driving. Alum Greg Midgette and Prof. Beau Kilmer ask, Can the same results be achieved outside of the Dakotas?

  • Profile of Black Emergency Doctors Features Alum

    Jun 8, 2020

    Janice Blanchard (cohort '98) was one of three DC-area black emergency physicians featured by local NPR station WAMU. "I think as a black doctor, it’s my responsibility to do everything in my power to make sure that a black patient is getting fair treatment," she said.

  • Bowman Honored as NM 40 Under Forty

    Jun 2, 2020

    As chief information and strategy officer for Albuquerque Public Schools, New Mexico's largest school district, alum Richard Bowman (cohort '06) is quite busy these days. But the recipient of a 2020 "New Mexico 40 Under Forty" award was happy to make some time for an interview.

  • Alum Describes Results of USC Antibody Study

    May 28, 2020

    Neeraj Sood (cohort '99) joined KTLA-TV live via Skype to talk about the results of the COVID-19 Antibody Study led by his team at the University of Southern California and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

  • A health insurance application on a tablet, photo by grinvalds/Getty Images

    Alum: How Would a Public Option on Health Insurance Affect Costs and Coverage?

    May 28, 2020

    Interest in a government-sponsored health insurance plan with publicly determined provider rates is growing. An analysis by Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and RAND colleagues looked at four such "public option" plans and found that lower provider payment rates would lower premiums. But the impact on enrollees would also depend on tax credits, and changes to the number of uninsured would be small.

  • Clear piggy bank with coins and red medical case, photo by Altayb/Getty Images

    Alum and Prof Present Options for Designing a Public Option

    May 28, 2020

    State and federal policymakers are considering adding state-backed public options to the individual market in an effort to expand health coverage and improve affordability. Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner analyzed what would happen if public options became available in U.S. health insurance exchanges.

  • Lazy boy on couch watching TV, photo by Tracy King/Adobe Stock

    Alum Finds Pandemic May Led to Increased Childhood Obesity

    May 27, 2020

    ​The childhood obesity rate in the United States may increase by 2.4% if school closures continue into December, according to a new study by Ruopeng An (cohort '08), an assistant professor at the Brown School at Washington University who studies obesity and social determinants of health.

  • A man carries food donated by Alianza Ecuatoriana International at a food pantry in Queens, New York, May 16, 2020, photo by Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

    Alum and Prof: Emergency COVID-19 Aid Helps College Students with Food and Housing

    May 26, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic has expanded the pool of cash-strapped college students, but many were already struggling. Alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05) and Prof. Drew Anderson say the crisis could draw attention to food and housing insecurity among college students, and give college leaders a chance to consider how to address these needs more systematically over the long-term.

  • Kim Jong-un attends the completion of a fertilizer plant north of Pyongyang, in this image released by KCNA on May 2, 2020, photo by KCNA/Reuters

    Alum: North Korean Provocations, Not Denuclearization

    May 8, 2020

    Kim Jong-un's reappearance raises questions about the course of U.S.–North Korea relationships in the coming year, writes Bruce Bennett (cohort '75). What should we expect? What can we learn from the past?

  • Yuna Wong standing behind a wargame, photo by Dori Walker/RAND Corporation

    The Serious Side of Gaming: Q&A with Yuna Wong

    May 8, 2020

    Alum Yuna Wong (cohort '00), codirector of RAND's Center for Gaming, didn't expect to make gaming a focus of her career. In this interview, she discusses what drew her to the field, what makes a good wargame, and her latest research on the dangers of putting too much trust in artificial intelligence.

  • Glass of whiskey with scales of justice in the background

    Alum and Prof Evaluate 24/7 Sobriety Program at Individual Level

    May 7, 2020

    24/7 Sobriety combines frequent alcohol testing with swift, certain, and modest sanctions for those who test positive for alcohol or miss a test. Alum Greg Midgette and Prof. Beau Kilmer used an instrumental variables approach for this study and found 24/7 reduced the probability a participant was rearrested or had probation revoked at 12 months by 49%.

  • Glass of alcohol, keys, and handcuffs on top of an arrest record with fingerprints, photo by TheCrimsonRibbon/Getty Images

    A Natural Experiment to Test the Effect of Sanction Certainty and Celerity on Substance-Impaired Driving: North Dakota's 24/7 Sobriety Program

    May 7, 2020

    Over half of participants ordered to abstain from substance use complete 24/7 Sobriety without a detected substance use event. At the county level, the program is associated with a 9% reduction in substance-impaired driving arrests.

  • A TV reporter wearing a mask, photo by brightstars/Getty Images

    Alum: Don't Make the Pandemic Worse with Poor Data Analysis

    May 6, 2020

    The need for immediate answers in the face of severe public health and economic distress may create a temptation to relax statistical standards, write David Groves (cohort '01) and five fellow codirectors of RAND's Methods Centers. But urgency should not preclude expert analysis and honest assessments of uncertainty. Mistaken assumptions could lead to counterproductive actions.

  • A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, February 6, 2018, photo by Thom Baur/Reuters

    Alum: Protecting the U.S. Supply on Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles

    May 6, 2020

    Bonnie Triezenberg (cohort '14) writes that her recent RAND report (with student Moon Kim, '18) on the global heavy lift launch market highlights the potential for a near term shortage of launch vehicles. An inability to launch U.S. defense and intelligence satellites in times of need could compromise national security.

  • Data center technician performing server maintenance, photo by Tatyana Aksenova/Adobe Stock

    Alum: IT Modernization Rolls on Amid the Coronavirus

    May 1, 2020

    Federal Drive interviewed Gordon Bitko (cohort '02), former FBI CIO, for a podcast about the strain that the pandemic has placed on the federal information technology infrastructure, which has highlighted the need for IT modernization.

  • Volunteer delivers groceries, photo by SkyLine/Adobe Stock

    Alum: The Government Can't Make You Happy

    May 1, 2020

    While arguing that "government is best at lowering the sources of unhappiness," Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) said in an interview that COVID-19 has created "an opportunity for personal spiritual transcendence and a laboratory for good ideas and public policy," in the near future.

  • Alum Jeremy Ghez Discusses His "Toolbox for Managers"

    Apr 30, 2020

    "If it wasn’t the pandemic, it would have been something else. Unless you accept the need for constant evolution and even reinvention, you’re unlikely to do well,” said Jeremy Ghez (cohort '06) in a Q&A with the website Poets&Quants about his recent book, Architects of Change: Designing Strategies for a Turbulent Business Environment. Ghez is a professor of economics and decision sciences at HEC Paris.