Alumni News & Announcements

  • Five Faculty Win Awards for Mentoring

    Oct 27, 2021

    RAND recently recognized five Pardee RAND faculty members — one of whom is also an alum — for their valuable contributions in mentoring junior researchers and advising colleagues.

  • A U.S. flag and flowers on the 9/11 memorial in New York City, New York, January 25, 2020, photo by Nicolas Economou/Reuters

    The Guilt I Carry Over 9/11 Drives Me to Help Others

    Sep 13, 2021

    Alum and U.S. military veteran Jonathan Wong (cohort '12) reflects on how the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks have influenced how he has lived his life since that day.

  • ‘Federal Service Is Incredibly Fulfilling’: Q&A with Alum David Howell

    Aug 31, 2021

    Looking at the career of alum David Howell (cohort '03), it might seem like he was helping the United States prepare for the COVID-19 pandemic since he graduated. He spoke with us about his experience in the federal government, working on pandemic preparedness and response, and more.

  • Close up of a police car at a nighttime traffic stop, photo by RichLegg/Getty Images

    Can Novel 'Swift-Certain-Fair' Programs Work Outside of Pioneering Jurisdictions?

    Jul 20, 2021

    South Dakota's 24/7 Sobriety Program requires individuals charged or convicted of alcohol-involved offenses to avoid alcohol and submit to frequent testing. Alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) and Prof. Beau Kilmer say this successful program appears to be making a difference in Montana as well.

  • A patient recieves a vaccination at a COVID-19 caccination clinic at Bethlehem Baptist Church in McKeesport, Allegheny County. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/51101479562/in/album-72157718930676885/">Photo</a> by Dan Zampogna / <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>

    Vulnerability, Inequity, and COVID-19: A Portrait of the Pandemic in Allegheny County

    Jul 19, 2021

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on vulnerable communities. Student Pedro Nascimento de Lima (cohort '19), alum Jordan Fischbach ('04), and RAND colleagues developed an interactive tool that shows how rates of testing, cases, and deaths, and the ability to practice social distancing, has differed across neighborhoods and populations in Pennsylvania's Allegheny County.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong-un inspects a long-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 in an undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency, May 15, 2017, photo by KCNA via Reuters

    North Korean Nuclear Weapons Pose an Existential Threat to China

    Jul 13, 2021

    Despite the current border closures between their two countries, China and North Korea remain resolutely pledged to a “blood-alliance.” But alum Bruce Bennett and student Diana Myers argue this partnership has vastly different implications depending on which side of the border you consider.

  • Twelve Alumni Present Career Talks

    Jun 14, 2021

    Alumni near and far shared their experiences with current students this spring through interactive Career Services webinars and discussions, taking advantage of one silver lining of our virtual world.

  • An elderly black woman doing gardening at an outdoor table, surrounded by green plants. Photo by SolStock / Getty Images

    Societal Impact of Research Funding for Women's Health

    Apr 22, 2021

    An examination of the impact of increased funding for research on Alzheimer's disease and Alzheimer's disease-related dementias in women, conducted by students Annie Chen and Hamad Al-Ibrahim, and alum Denise Quigley, showed that small investments in women's health research can yield large gains, including benefits above investing in general research.

  • Empty beds in a hospital ward, photo by  onurdongel/Getty Images

    Reducing Hospital Spending: Three Policy Options

    Apr 21, 2021

    Alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), student Nabeel Qureshi ('18), and colleagues summarize the spending impact of policy options to reduce hospital prices paid by private health plans, outlining design choices and effectiveness levels for each approach.

  • Still from a documentary by a North Korean TV station, titled “The efforts and sacrifices (of the Chairman of the North Korean State Affairs Committee, Kim Jong-un) for the people in 2020,” broadcast February 1, 2021, photo by KCTV via / Latin America News Agency/Reuters

    COVID-19 Exacerbates North Korea's Bad Choices

    Apr 20, 2021

    Recently, Kim Jong-un admitted that North Korea is facing a dire situation. It was surprising that he would admit circumstances which at face value suggest major failures on his part. Alum Bruce Bennett asks, Why is Kim admitting that such circumstances are developing in the North now?

  • Reed, Hodgson Discuss Election Security for the Future

    Mar 15, 2021

    Record high U.S. election turnout in November 2020 was matched with record low confidence in vote's accuracy. Harper Reed, a member of Pardee RAND’s Board of Governors, sat down (virtually) with Prof. Quentin Hodgson to discuss the election and how the United States can ensure cyber and physical security—and trust—in future elections.

  • The Hoover Dam on the Colorado River on the border of Arizona and Nevada, photo by stryjek / Adobe Stock

    Water Planning for the Uncertain Future

    Mar 8, 2021

    James Syme (cohort '18) and alumni David Groves ('01) and Edmundo Molina-Perez ('11) conducted seven case studies focusing on the western United States and Mexico to develop an interactive tool that provides information about decisionmaking under deep uncertainty (DMDU) methods—specifically, Robust Decision Making (RDM).

  • The emergency room entrance at Essentia Health, a 133-bed hospital in Fargo, North Dakota, October 25, 2020, photo by Bing Guan/Reuters

    Setting U.S. Hospital Prices Could Cut Overall Health Spending by Billions

    Feb 18, 2021

    Price regulations face political obstacles and have been strongly opposed by medical providers. But alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and student Nabeel Qureshi ('18) find that setting prices for all commercial health care payers could reduce hospital spending by $61.9 billion to $236.6 billion a year if the rates were set at 100 to 150 percent of the amounts paid by Medicare.

  • Intricate real life-like models in a wargame at Marine Corps Base Quantico in Quantico, Virginia, August 23, 2017, photo by Frances Seybold/U.S. Marine Corps

    Wargames as an Educational Tool

    Feb 8, 2021

    The benefits of games for military education are well documented, writes alum Ellie Bartels (cohort '15). But harnessing the potential of games to foster innovation may require a commitment to sustain gaming over the years needed to explore a problem space and develop and stress-test new ideas.

  • A woman stands on a ruined building after Hurricane Eta, in Wawa Bar, a Miskito indigenous community in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, November 23, 2020, photo by Katlyn Holland/CRS /Latin America News Agency/Reuters

    Previous Disasters Provide Important Lessons for Central America's Recovery from Hurricanes

    Jan 11, 2021

    As the global community works together to assist Central America in recovering from the disastrous 2020 hurricane season, alum David Groves (cohort '01) and colleagues write, experiences from other recent disaster recovery efforts offer some helpful lessons both for the governments of the region as well as outsiders providing resources and support.

  • U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptors from 94th Fighter Squadron landed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Aug. 10, 2017, photo by Staff Sgt. Carlin O. Leslie/U.S. Air Force

    Bad Idea: Overly Focusing on Development and Acquisition Speed

    Dec 16, 2020

    The Pentagon has in recent years turned its attention to the need for speed in weapons system development and acquisition. Alum Jon Wong (cohort '12) writes that, while shortening the timeline for program development and fielding is important for Defense Department acquisition leaders, overly prioritizing speed can lead to issues with program management, sustainment, and other areas.

  • Beyond 2020: What Lies Ahead for the Biden-Harris Administration?

    Dec 10, 2020

    Dean Susan Marquis, journalist Soledad O’Brien, and professors Debra Knopman and Howard Shatz discussed the changes we can expect from the incoming U.S. administration on issues from energy and climate change to economic policy and COVID-19 response and recovery efforts.

  • Student Ellie Bartels guides members of the Board of Governors in a strategic game

    For These Alumnae, Games Are Hard Work

    Dec 1, 2020

    Games are more than just theoretical to alumnae Ellie Bartels (cohort '15), Claire O'Hanlon ('13), and Yuna Wong ('00). Bartels is the new director of the RAND Center for Gaming, O'Hanlon recently launched an online version of her card game ControVersus, and Wong helped create RAND's first publicly available board game, Hedgemony.

  • APPAM Fall Conference Goes Online

    Dec 1, 2020

    The 42nd annual fall APPAM Research Conference may have been virtual, but that didn't stop Pardee RAND students, alumni, and faculty (and RAND researchers) from having a real presence.

  • The hydroelectric dam Cachi in Ujarras de Cartago, 60 miles of San Jose, Costa Rica, May 25, 2007, photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

    The Benefits and Costs of Decarbonizing Costa Rica's Economy

    Nov 24, 2020

    Costa Rica set the ambitious goal of becoming carbon-neutral by 2050. Alumni David Groves and Edmundo Molina-Perez, with students James Syme and Carlos Calvo Hernandez, evaluated the benefits and costs of its National Decarbonization Plan and found that under most plausible assumptions about the future, the plan would achieve or nearly achieve its goals and do so at a net economic benefit.