Alumni News & Announcements

  • Books in prison, concept of freedom of thought, photo by tapui/AdobeStock

    Alumni Event: Expanding Education and Employment Opportunities for Inmates and Ex-offenders

    Sep 21, 2019

    Contributions to the Alumni Impact Fund are helping RAND researchers advance education opportunities and career prospects for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals. All alumni are welcome to join us for a brunch discussion with Professors Lois Davis and Priscillia Hunt and other current AIF recipients.

  • Healthcare, opioid epidemic and drug abuse concept with the map of USA filled with oxycodone and hydrocodone pharmaceutical pills on the American flag, photo by Victor Moussa/AdobeStock

    Alumni Event: Solving the Opioid Crisis

    Sep 12, 2019

    Alum Brad Stein (cohort '97), Prof. Beau Kilmer, and other RAND experts discussed their efforts to model the comprehensive opioid ecosystem and help reverse the tide of this critical challenge. Dean Susan Marquis moderated the discussion.

  • Cocaine, cannabis leaf, and syringe, photos by Bits and Splits, underworld, and Leonid/Adobe Stock

    How Big Is the U.S. Market for Cannabis, Cocaine, Heroin, and Meth?

    Aug 20, 2019

    Americans spent about $150 billion on cannabis, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine in 2016, according to research by alum Greg Midgette (cohort '09), student Steve Davenport ('15), and professor Beau Kilmer. The cannabis market was roughly the size of the cocaine and meth markets combined.

  • Group of medical practitioners in a circle, talking, seen from above, photo by Cecilie_Arcurs/Getty Images

    Identifying High-Performing Health Systems

    Jul 24, 2019

    When it comes to identifying high-performing health systems, alum Cheryl Damberg (cohort '89) finds, what you measure and how you measure it matters.

  • Elderly couple looking at sticky notes on a wall, photo by MonicaNinker/Getty Images

    Is Canada Prepared to Meet Demand for Alzheimer's Treatment?

    Jul 18, 2019

    If a treatment to slow the progression of Alzheimer's became available in 2021, hundreds of thousands of patients in Canada could progress to Alzheimer's dementia while on wait lists unless health care capacity is increased. Student Sangita Baxi (cohort '17) and alumni Jodi Liu ('12) and Jakub Hlavka ('14) explore challenges and suggest potential solutions.

  • Newborn hand holding the finger of an adult hand, photo by deng qiufeng/Getty Images

    Improving the Child Welfare System to Respond to the Needs of Substance-Exposed Infants

    Jul 17, 2019

    To realize the gains envisioned by recent legislation, alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) says the Administration and Congress should prioritize additional funding to modernize our child welfare system to meet the unique needs of families affected by substance misuse.

  • Smart car 3D rendering, photo by Production Perig/Adobe Stock

    When an Autonomous Vehicle Is Hacked, Who Is Liable?

    Jul 12, 2019

    Hacks on autonomous vehicles could lead to deaths, property destruction, ransomware attacks, or data theft. Maya Buenaventura and Pavan Katkar (both cohort '14) worked with RAND colleagues to explore several scenarios that illustrate the policy challenges facing the civil legal system, insurers, and others.

  • Arthur Brooks, author and Pardee RAND alumnus, discussing his new book at RAND's headquarters in Santa Monica, California, May 17, 2019, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Alum Arthur Brooks Tells Americans to Answer Hate with Love

    Jul 8, 2019

    Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) spoke at a RAND event to discuss his new book, Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt. He stressed that we don't have to disagree less, but we do have to disagree better.

  • Australia technology of internet of things IOT big data cloud computing, conceptual 3D render by immimagery/AdobeStock

    Designing a Capability Development Framework for Australian Home Affairs

    Jun 24, 2019

    Australia's Department of Home Affairs is responsible for domestic security, law enforcement, migration, and the movement of goods across Australia’s borders. Alum Jon Wong (cohort '12) and colleagues analyzed which capability development lifecycle management framework best suits the department's needs for an enterprise-level approach to investment decisions.

  • RAND & Pardee RAND Alumni Summer Reunion

    Jun 20, 2019

    Come reunite with alumni from all eras. The summer reunion in Santa Monica is a chance for RAND and Pardee RAND alumni to connect with colleagues past and present, reminisce with friends, and meet the newest members of the community.

  • Picture of a crowd of people holding and raising rainbow flags during an LGBT parade, photo by BalkansCat.

    Sexual Minority Disparities in Opioid Misuse

    Jun 12, 2019

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults, particularly bisexual women, are at significantly higher risk than heterosexuals for prescription opioid misuse and heroin use, according to research by alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). Disparities in rates of opioid misuse among LGB adults are concerning given elevated risks of overdose.

  • Findings Highlights Donors, Scholars, and Transitions

    Jun 5, 2019

    The spring issue of our quarterly newsletter showcases the many ways we support our students, alumni, and faculty. From scholarships to mentoring, and networking opportunities to continuing education — even summer reading recommendations for fun and personal development — Pardee RAND has it all.

  • Arthur Brooks Shares Life Lessons in Book Talk

    May 21, 2019

    The problem in American public life today isn't excessive anger, said alum Arthur Brooks (cohort '96), at his book talk last month; it's a culture of contempt. His book Love Your Enemies explores how we can find love in our hearts — not just civility and tolerance — for those with whom we disagree.

  • Close-up of a person reading/texting on their smartphone, photo by sam thomas/Getty Images

    Three Takeaways from RAND's Analysis of News in the Digital Age

    May 14, 2019

    How has the rise of digital technology shaped the way that news is presented? Student Mahlet Tebeka (cohort '17), alum Steve Davenport ('15), and professors Jennifer Kavanagh and Bill Marcellino conducted an empirical study to find out. Here's what you need to know from their findings.

  • College students in silhouette tossing caps in the air, photo by Rawpixel Ltd/Getty Images

    Addressing the College Completion Problem

    May 9, 2019

    More than half of students who enter college end up dropping out without ever completing a degree or certificate. Time and money are wasted without the benefits of a degree. Alum Lindsey Daugherty argues that, while colleges are experimenting with novel techniques to boost completion rates, strategic support from the federal government could further these efforts.

  • Moderator Sale Lilly (standing) with panelists Stephanie Herder, Bhaskar Krishnamachari, and Matt Smith, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Blockchain: The Second Decade

    Apr 16, 2019

    Blockchain, which was invented in 2008, is now in its second decade. To help students and alumni understand the implications of this disruptive technology, Career Services welcomed four experts in a discussion of potential commercial and regulatory approaches.

  • Supporters of a "Medicare for All" plan gather on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., September 13, 2017, photo by Yuri Gripas/Reuters

    Spending Estimates Under Medicare for All

    Apr 10, 2019

    Under a Medicare for All plan similar to some proposals being discussed in Congress, alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12) and Prof. Christine Eibner calculate that total health expenditures would be an estimated 1.8 percent higher in 2019, relative to the status quo. While this is a small change in national spending, the federal government's health spending would increase substantially, rising by an estimated 221 percent.

  • Used Narcan (naloxone hydrochloride) containers and syringes sit in a case, after paramedics revived a man in his 40s, who was found unresponsive, after overdosing on opioids in Salem, Massachusetts, August 9, 2017, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    (Grey's) Anatomy of an Opioid Crisis

    Apr 8, 2019

    More than 130 Americans die every day after overdosing on opioids. So when one of the most popular shows on network television made opioid misuse a major plotline, alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) and Prof. Sarah MacCarthy paid especially rapt attention to how the show would present this public health crisis. How closely would it mirror reality? Pretty closely, for the narrow slice of the opioid crisis it addressed.

  • Petty Officer 1st Class Krystyna Duffy, a boatswain's mate assigned to Coast Guard Station Golden Gate in San Francisco, drives a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat near the Golden Gate Bridge, February 8, 2018, photo by PO3 Sarah Wi/U.S. Coast Guard

    Alum Examines Why Women Leave the Coast Guard, and What Could Encourage Them to Stay

    Mar 29, 2019

    Women leave the Coast Guard at higher rates than men. Through focus groups, alum David Schulker (cohort '07) uncovered concerns about work environment, career issues, and personal life matters. More inclusive personnel policies could help the Coast Guard address these concerns and retain more women.

  • Engineers are using this specially constructed five-story building to study how high-value buildings, such as hospitals and data centers, can remain operational after an earthquake, in San Diego, California, April 17, 2012, photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

    Seismic Safety Upgrades May Cost California Hospitals Billions

    Mar 28, 2019

    David Catt (cohort '16) worked with alum Daniel Waxman ('10) and several professors to estimate the cost to California hospitals of seismic retrofitting. The upgrades could cost between $34 billion and $143 billion statewide, but one-third of hospitals are already in some form of financial distress.

  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands ahead of their talks at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China, March 21, 2017, photo by Etienne Oliveau/Reuters/Pool

    How Has the Israel-China Relationship Evolved?

    Mar 21, 2019

    Since the early 2000s, relations between China and Israel have expanded in areas like diplomacy, trade, investment, construction, educational partnerships, scientific cooperation, and tourism. Alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) and student Emily Haskel ('16) examine what challenges the relationship poses for Israel and the United States.

  • An aerial view of the San Francisco Bay delta, photo by Andrei / Adobe Stock

    Decision Support Tool for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Levees Investment Strategy

    Mar 7, 2019

    The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta faces complex and varied flood risks. Possible investments to mitigate these risks are numerous, and they will affect Delta risks differently. A decision support tool developed by alum David Groves (cohort '01) and student James Syme ('18) aided the Delta Stewardship Council in developing a Delta Levees Investment Strategy.

  • Findings Highlights Importance of Leadership

    Mar 5, 2019

    The winter issue of our quarterly newsletter features students and alumni holding lead roles in APPAM, the school taking the lead in reinventing the policy Ph.D., and a new leadership team in Pardee RAND's Development office. Also: a new course in engaging communities in research, and hands-on research exploring the benefits of local air quality data.

  • Skyline of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, illustration by Malte Muller

    Resilience and Adaptation Strategies Can Address the Impacts of Climate Change

    Feb 26, 2019

    Climate change is already generating storms, heat waves, and droughts beyond historical norms and local governments need to do more to prepare. A decisionmaking framework developed by Pardee RAND faculty, including alum Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04), allows communities to stress-test ideas, weigh the trade-offs, and plan for a range of possible futures.

  • Coast to Coast, Alumni Dine with Dean

    Feb 8, 2019

    Dean Susan Marquis, our "Foodie-in-Chief," loves grabbing a meal with alumni (and off-site students) when she travels. In this quarter alone, she's hosted events in Palo Alto and Berkeley, CA, and in Washington, D.C.