Alumni News & Announcements

  • Children in line at school cafeteria

    Middle School Intervention Program Leads to Long-Term BMI Reduction

    May 23, 2016

    A five-week obesity prevention program helped obese seventh grade students lose weight over a long-term period, according to research by alum Mark Schuster (cohort '91) and RAND colleagues. The average reduction in body mass index two years later when they entered high school translated into about nine pounds lower bodyweight.

  • Globe on a chessboard

    How Can Gaming Help Test Your Theory?

    May 18, 2016

    The act of designing a game will force you to articulate your theory or to be more specific about it. It will also require you to operationalize your variables and theoretical constructs of interest into a specific context, and prompt you to anticipate the ways in which it may play out in that scenario.

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong-un presides over a rally and parade in Pyongyang's main ceremonial square, North Korea, May 10, 2016

    Behind North Korea's Bid for a 'Peace Treaty'

    May 18, 2016

    By insisting on a peace treaty with America, North Korea is probably seeking war, writes professor and alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75). Its leaders likely hope a treaty would lead to a withdrawal of U.S. forces from South Korea, setting the stage for an invasion by the North.

  • Man wearing half civilian suit and half military uniform

    Santa Monica Event: Soldiers and Civilian Jobs

    May 14, 2016

    More than 2.8 million men and women have served in the military since 9/11, and more than 50 percent face a period of unemployment when they leave. Jeff Wenger will explain how a tool developed by RAND can reduce veteran unemployment and job turnover for veterans who do find jobs.

  • Man taking pills out of a medicine cabinet

    Alum Offers a Sobering Look at the Opioid Epidemic

    May 13, 2016

    Opioid overdoses were the greatest cause of accidental death in America in 2014. Alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) participated in a panel discussion at RAND that addressed the epidemic, including societal attitudes toward pain and addiction, poor understanding of the mechanics of addiction itself, economic drivers, legal responses, and treatment approaches.

  • Shira Efron

    RAND Corporation Appoints Special Advisor on Israel with the Center for Middle East Public Policy

    Apr 21, 2016

    Alum Shira Efron (cohort '11) has been named a special advisor on Israel at the RAND Corporation Center for Middle East Public Policy, to continue to develop relationships with Israeli institutions and attract support for further Israel-related public policy research.

  • Construction cranes in the city of Erbil in Kurdistan - Iraq

    Calculating the Gross Regional Product of the Kurdistan Region — Iraq

    Mar 22, 2016

    The annual calculation of the gross regional product (GRP) is a critical indicator as the Kurdistan Regional Government seeks to develop comprehensive and reliable statistics on the Kurdistan Region — Iraq (KRI) as it charts a course toward peace and prosperity. Alum Shmuel Abramzon (cohort '10), student Nelly Mejia (cohort '11), and several professors worked together to develop that calculation.

  • Bradley Stein interviewed on CCTV

    Alum Discusses U.S. Drug Addiction and Drug Abuse Problem

    Mar 9, 2016

    Alum Bradley D. Stein (cohort '97) is interviewed by CCTV about drug addiction and drug abuse in America.

  • Gold dollar signs surrounding a map of the United States

    Small Ideas for Saving Big Health Care Dollars

    Mar 8, 2016

    Big proposals to rein in health care spending in the United States have encountered stiff political and organizational resistance. But adopting a combination of smaller ideas could save the U.S. health care system a total of up to $26 billion a year.

  • A Navy guard patrols Camp Delta's detainee recreation yard during the early morning at Guantánamo Bay naval base on July 7, 2010

    How to Fix Guantanamo's Broken Justice

    Mar 7, 2016

    Replacing military judges with federal judges would expedite the process of resolving the Guantánamo cases in ways that would reflect better on the credibility and legitimacy of the U.S. justice system, while serving the interests of Congress, the president, survivors, and victims' families, writes alum Jack Riley (cohort '88).

  • Winter Issue of Findings Features Many New Alumni Positions

    Mar 3, 2016

    Twelve Pardee RAND alumni have started new jobs or roles as since the last issue of Findings hit the web. This issue also features some exciting OJT work, lots of reports and commentaries, three alumni who recently visited campus, and a Q&A with the alumni representative to the Board of Governors.

  • Flood wall construction along the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet, New Orleans, Louisiana

    Analysis to Support Louisiana's Flood Risk and Resilience Program and Application to the National Disaster Resilience Competition

    Mar 1, 2016

    Pardee RAND alumni David Groves (cohort '01), Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04), and David R. Johnson (cohort '08) helped Louisiana develop an application for the Natural Disaster Resilience Competition. The team performed a quantitative analysis of flood risk reduction under different amounts of flood mitigation investment in three Louisiana parishes.

  • U.S. military police guard detaintees in Guantanamo Bay

    Observations from Guantanamo

    Mar 1, 2016

    In this Call with the Experts, Alum Jack Riley (cohort '88) discusses the likelihood of Guantanamo Bay detention camp closing before the end of President Obama's term, as well as recommendations on how to fairly and transparently expedite the trials.

  • Hui Wang, Dick Neu and Elizabeth Brown at the RAND event commemorating  life and legacy of Henry "Harry" Rowen RAND's 2nd President on February 17, 2016.

    Q&A with Hui Wang, Alumni Representative to the Pardee RAND Board of Governors

    Mar 1, 2016

    Since leaving Pardee RAND in 1992, alum Hui Wang (cohort '88) has had a dynamic and extensive career. We recently asked Wang a few questions about his time at Pardee RAND and how his degree has impacted his career.

  • A North Korean long-range rocket is launched at the Sohae launch site in North Korea, February 7, 2016

    North Korea Rocket Launch: Why Did Kim Fire a Missile Now?

    Feb 8, 2016

    Kim Jong-un is probably seeking clear successes before his important Seventh Party Congress in May, when he wants to appear to be the all-powerful leader of North Korea, writes Prof. (and alum) Bruce Bennett (cohort '75).

  • U.S. Navy LTJG Mike Gibson instructs the Ethiopian National Defense Force engineers on daily operations for engineering teams in Fiche, Ethiopia, December 19, 2012

    Defense Institution Building in Africa

    Jan 4, 2016

    Effective defense institution building (DIB) requires close coordination at every level. Improved coordination, planning, and implementation should enable DIB to advance U.S. defense objectives in Africa more effectively, according to research by alum Chaoling Feng (cohort '09) and RAND colleagues.

  • Doctor consulting with female patient

    Examining Employer, Insurer, and Industry Perspectives on Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research

    Jan 4, 2016

    Alum Robert Dubois (cohort '87) teamed up with profs Tom Concannon and Dmitry Khodyakov to examine what three key stakeholder groups think about the comparative effectiveness research done by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) and what the institute can do to increase stakeholder awareness and interest.

  • Environmentalists hold a banner which reads in part, "For the Climate," near the Eiffel Tower during the World Climate Change Conference 2015

    COP21: Ambition and Momentum

    Dec 17, 2015

    Negotiators in Paris last week achieved a historic breakthrough by adopting a fundamentally different, and likely more effective, institutional framework to address climate change, write alum Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) and Prof. Rob Lempert. The framework builds on two concepts missing from past attempts to forge a global treaty: voluntary participation and adaptive policymaking.

  • Smart phone in woman's hand.

    Electronic Surveillance of Mobile Devices for Law Enforcement

    Dec 10, 2015

    Mobile phones collect and retain enormous amounts of information that can be useful in criminal investigations. However, state and local law enforcement face substantial challenges when accessing these data, according to research by professors Edward Balkovich and Don Prosnitz, student Anne Boustead (cohort '11), and alum Steven C. Isley (cohort '10).

  • Kid with skateboard sitting on the curb with friends and family in the background

    Health Implications of Social Networks for Children Living in Public Housing

    Dec 3, 2015

    Research by alum Susan Burkhauser (cohort '09) and professors Heather Schwartz, David Kennedy, and Harold Green, social networks are significantly associated with alcohol consumption among teens living in public housing and with mental distress among girls, underscoring the potential importance of networks for the health of vulnerable children.

  • Fall Issue of Findings Highlights Pardee RAND's Legacy

    Dec 2, 2015

    With features on Charles Wolf, Harold Brown, and Harry Rowen, "This issue of Findings highlights the specific blessing we have in the school's history and legacy," remarks Dean Susan Marquis. Other news includes the new cohort, APPAM 2015 presentations, and lots of alumni news.

  • Honduran boys helped by Feed My Starving Children

    Peer Nutrition Counseling Reduces Food Insecurity Among HIV+ Hondurans

    Nov 24, 2015

    A peer-delivered nutritional counseling intervention for Hondurans living with HIV was associated with improvements in dietary quality and reduced food insecurity among a population of diverse nutritional statuses, according to research by alum Kartika Palar (cohort '06), student Melissa Felician (cohort '13), and professors Kathryn Derose and Bing Han. The authors suggest that future research should examine if such an intervention can improve adherence among people on ART.

  • The famous In-N-Out Burger at the corner of Gayley and Le Conte in Westwood, Los Angeles near the UCLA campus, designed by Kanner Architects

    Neighborhood Food Environment Minimally Affects Obesity in L.A.

    Nov 19, 2015

    In Los Angeles, the number of fast-food restaurants in a 3.0-mile radius is positively associated with fast-food consumption, and the number of convenience stores in a walkable, 0.25-mile radius distance is negatively associated with obesity, according to research by alum Ricardo Basurto-Davila (cohort '03), student Nelly Mejia-Gonzalez (cohort '11), and professor Roland Sturm.

  • Over 5,000 weapons confiscated from criminals in Los Angeles County and collected through a gun buyback program were  melted and reformed as steel in Rancho Cucamonga, California, July 2013

    Gun Violence: Where Is the Research That Might Save Lives?

    Nov 5, 2015

    Gun violence is an important public health problem that accounts for more than 33,000 deaths each year in the United States but in 1996, Congress stripped the CDC of funding for any research that could be associated with gun control advocacy. The lack of CDC funding has deterred researchers, writes Prof. (and alum) Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85).

  • Shasta Lake is 100 feet below its normal levels January 23, 2014

    California's Drought and Water Policy

    Sep 30, 2015

    California has implemented numerous policy changes to cope with a record-breaking, four-year drought. In this Events @ RAND podcast, a panel of experts—including Professor (and alum) David Groves (cohort '01)—discuss what government agencies can do to better manage water resources, what methods are most effective at encouraging citizens to use water wisely, and how leaders can better plan for future climate crises.