Alumni News & Announcements

  • Testing the Scenario Hypothesis via an Experimental Comparison

    Mar 16, 2017

    Alumni Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) and Zhimin Mao (cohort '11), along with professor Robert Lempert and other RAND researchers, undertook an experimental comparison of scenarios and forecasts to see which was most useful in a complex decision environment. The results offer lessons for designing decision support tools.

  • Five Myths About American Obesity

    Mar 13, 2017

    Two in three Americans are overweight or obese. There are popular theories about what's causing the obesity epidemic but research does not support them. What is clear, write alum Ruopeng An (cohort '08) and professor Roland Sturm, is that most U.S. adults eat too many calories.

  • Winter 2017 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Mar 10, 2017

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about the Charles Wolf memorial, our distinguished visiting professors, a new tech lab and design studio, an upcoming APPAM student conference, and more.

  • Alumni Evaluate the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan

    Mar 9, 2017

    Alumni David Groves (cohort '01) and Zhimin Mao (cohort '11) as well as professors Debra Knopman and Nidhi Kalra, evaluated potential effects of demand and climate uncertainties on investments recently undertaken by the Jinan Municipal Water Resources Bureau according to the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan, and assessed the potential of new investments and management strategies to help Jinan meet its long-term water resources goals.

  • Death by Nerve Gas: Two Arrests, Many Questions in Attack in Malaysia

    Mar 7, 2017

    Details about the murder of Kim Jong-Un's half-brother are still being uncovered. If a firm connection to North Korea can be made, others in the region should react strongly. writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75). Otherwise, Kim may conclude that further provocations are worth it.

  • Four Alumni Visit to Discuss Careers

    Mar 6, 2017

    Thanks to the efforts of the Career Services Advisory Committee, four alumni — Loren Yager (cohort '87), Ying Liu ('04), Eric Jesse ('08), and Jon Wong ('12) — visited Pardee RAND during the winter quarter to discuss their varied careers.

  • Community Colleges Can Be 'First Responders' in Retraining Displaced Workers

    Feb 16, 2017

    Many of the occupations with the most career opportunities require two-year degrees or certificates, such as those in health care and technology. Alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05) says community colleges play a key role in training students for these jobs, and offer an environment that is supportive of displaced and dissatisfied workers.

  • Assessment of the Civilian Acquisition Workforce Personnel Demonstration Project

    Feb 15, 2017

    Student Cameron Wright (cohort '12), alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), and professor Laura Werber joined forces with RAND colleagues to assess DoD's AcqDemo, finding several aspects of the program that are performing well but also areas that could be improved.

  • How to Counter Transnational Criminal Networks

    Jan 27, 2017

    Transnational criminal networks have expanded their global reach. In some cases, they have even converged with terrorist groups. Research by alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) and RAND colleagues examines how these networks threaten U.S. interests and what can be done to combat them.

  • Helping Soldiers Use Army Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities in Civilian Jobs

    Jan 24, 2017

    Some veterans struggle to find jobs after they leave the Army. Alum Michael Shanley (cohort '79) helped to identify a broad range of high-quality civilian jobs that match Army KSAs.

  • Oregon's Options for Financing Health Care

    Jan 19, 2017

    Federal health care reform had just begun in 2013 when Oregon authorized a study to improve how the state pays for health care. A comparison of the projected impacts and feasibility of four options—developed by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), professors Chapin White and Christine Eibner, and several RAND colleagues—can help Oregon's stakeholders choose the option that best suits their needs.

  • Trump Should Confront Kim Over ICBM Tests

    Jan 6, 2017

    Whether successful or not, an ICBM test by North Korea would be very much against U.S. interests and President-elect Trump should act to counter it as early as possible. A turn to the basics of deterrence would be the path most likely to succeed, writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75).

  • Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Service Members

    Jan 4, 2017

    Prescription drug misuse is of critical concern for the military because of its potential impact on the health and well-being of personnel, military readiness, and associated health care costs. Alumni Janice Blanchard (cohort '98) and Jennifer Walters (cohort '11) worked with RAND colleagues to offer ideas for addressing the problem.

  • RAND Celebrates Alum Rick Fallon's Career

    Jan 4, 2017

    Pardee RAND alum Rick Fallon (cohort '75) retired from RAND in January 2017 after two decades of service. As CFO and VP of Finance & Administration, Fallon worked on critical business decisions, performance measures, and initiatives that have increased the agility of RAND's operations.

  • Approaching Future Offsets

    Dec 21, 2016

    Grand strategy, acquisitions, and technological considerations may shape the debate about the future of the U.S. military for some time to come. Only where all three elements align are future offsets likely to succeed, writes alum Yuna Huh Wong (cohort '00).

  • Toward a Learning Behavioral Health Care System

    Dec 20, 2016

    New technologies for capturing and sharing data have begun to transform the way providers practice medicine in the United States. Expanding these technologies to behavioral health care could enhance the delivery of services and improve outcomes for millions of Americans, writes alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97).

  • Putting Health into the Health Care Debate

    Dec 10, 2016

    How much return is the United States getting for spending over 17 percent of its gross domestic product on health care? Not nearly enough, says professor and alum Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85), vice president and director of RAND Health. The health care debate should focus on improving population health and ensuring the country is getting the biggest bang for its bucks.

  • One-Stop Social Services Efforts May Improve Community College Outcomes

    Nov 30, 2016

    Students participating in programs that provide a comprehensive range of support services are more likely to persist in attending community college, according to research by alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05).

  • Fulton Talks with Students During Career Development Lunch

    Oct 21, 2016

    Alum Brent Fulton (cohort ’01) returned to Pardee RAND on October 18 as part of the Career Development program. He discussed his role as associate director of the Nicholas C. Petris Center on Health Care Markets and Consumer Welfare at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health.

  • Dean Dines with Alumni in Boston and Berkeley

    Oct 14, 2016

    Dean Marquis met with five alumni (including Jenn Walters, cohort '11) in Berkeley, and five others in Boston, during her trips this fall. Make sure the Development Office knows how to reach you so we can invite you to dinners and other events in your area!

  • Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Fall Prevention Intervention

    Oct 5, 2016

    Alum Daniel A. Waxman (cohort '10) and student Xiaoyu Nie (cohort '14) evaluated a fall prevention intervention but found no significant reduction in costs or emergency room visits.

  • How to Be Safer in the Arctic

    Oct 3, 2016

    The Arctic is more accessible than it once was, but it's still a formidable place to travel. An emergency involving a cruise ship or a downed plane could stress the search-and-rescue system. But modest investments and planning measures can make a big difference, write alum Timothy Smith (cohort '13) and prof. Abbie Tingstad.

  • Workers' Compensation Reforms Helped Replace Wages and Offset Earnings Losses After the Great Recession

    Sep 27, 2016

    California workers' compensation law is likely succeeding in providing additional benefits for permanently disabled workers, and has helped to offset the impact of the Great Recession, according to research by alum Ujwal Kharel (cohort '11).

  • Physicians with Waivers to Prescribe Buprenorphine for Opioid Addiction Have Capacity to Treat More Patients

    Sep 20, 2016

    Many American physicians who prescribe buprenorphine to treat individuals addicted to opioids are prescribing substantially below the patient limits allowed by law, according to research by alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). More than 20 percent of waivered physicians treated only three or fewer patients.

  • Targeting Palliative and End-of-Life Care

    Sep 12, 2016

    Pursuing effective models for palliative care and focusing on patients with cancer, dementia, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may improve outcomes.