Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Investing in Infrastructure? Don't Forget the Electric Grid

    Dec 7, 2016

    To maximize the potential benefits of a multibillion-dollar smart grid investment, student Kathleen Loa (cohort '12) and professor Aimee Curtright say a closer examination of technology and policy is needed. First, weigh the preferences and constraints of the various stakeholders and how technology can or cannot meet their objectives.

  • Fall 2016 Findings Features New Look, New Students

    Dec 5, 2016

    In our quarterly alumni newsletter, we feature our new cohort, a new design, and a look back at the life of our beloved founding dean, who passed away in October.

  • Distinguished Professors to Visit Campus

    Nov 29, 2016

    Pardee RAND will welcome four Distinguished Visiting Professors next quarter. Stanford's Alain Enthoven, Harvard and NBER's Martin Feldstein, and NYU's Paul Light will each be in residence at Pardee RAND this winter. The Ohio State University's Ann Pendleton-Jullian will be visiting until June.

  • Thorpe Says Schools Can End America’s Health Crisis

    Nov 17, 2016

    Schools are uniquely situated to whip kids into shape, writes alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80), chairman of the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease. Children spend most days at school — and typically have at least one meal there. So teachers and administrators could provide students with the resources to stay healthy.

  • To Increase Diversity in Tech, We Need to Rethink What 'Tech' Is

    Nov 17, 2016

    The tech sector is a driving force for high-skill, high-wage job creation in the United States, but too few women and minorities reap the gains. Rethinking what defines today's tech jobs, along with greater investment in public-private partnerships, could go a long way toward bridging the diversity gap, writes student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15).

  • Ghez: U.S. Tech Giants Might Not Dominate the World After All

    Nov 16, 2016

    In Forbes, alum Jeremy Ghez (cohort '06) writes that Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon are each trying to impose the most long-lasting business model that will lock in consumers for an extended period of time. But they are not infallible.

  • Montoya Seeks Deeds, Not Words, to Help Countries Measure Learning

    Nov 16, 2016

    Looking at Sustainable Development Indicators, alum Silvia Montoya (cohort '06), director of the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, says the good news is that education is among the areas in best shape. But there is still work to be done when it comes to learning outcomes.

  • Brooks Says Donald Trump Filled the Dignity Deficit

    Nov 9, 2016

    "Tuesday’s election results stunned pollsters and pundits. But to observers who have been watching deeper trends across America, the outcome was hardly incomprehensible," writes alum Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) in the Wall Street Journal.

  • Students Advise Big Blue Bus as Part of Client-Oriented Policy Analysis Course

    Nov 6, 2016

    Julia Pollak (cohort '12), Andrew Cady and Jakub Hlavka (both cohort '14) helped to optimize local transit connectivity by developing a robust set of performance measures for first- and last-mile bus services to the seven new Expo Light Rail stations on L.A.'s Westside.

  • Romero Suggests a Novel Way to Fund Health Insurance: Revenue Bonds

    Nov 3, 2016

    Health reformers talk of 'bending the cost curve': cutting medical inflation, which has long been several times overall inflation. ... If you can’t bend the cost curve, bend the curve on the cost of funding. Financing techniques can fund health care without deficits, writes alum Philip Romero (cohort '83) in the Portland Business Journal.

  • Pardee RAND Partners with Eisenhower Fellows Program

    Oct 27, 2016

    In conjunction with Eisenhower Fellowships’ inaugural Africa Program, EF sent eight Fellows to Pardee RAND Graduate School in Santa Monica, California for three days of intensive skill-building, leadership training and transformative knowledge development, October 24-26, 2016.

  • CVD Prevention Important in Breast Cancer Patients

    Oct 13, 2016

    Mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major competing risk in women with early-stage breast cancer, according to findings by alum Geoffrey Anderson (cohort '83) and University of Toronto colleagues, published in JAMA Cardiology.

  • The Hot Spots of the World

    Oct 13, 2016

    Scarcity of food, energy, and water endangers the lives of millions. So Pardee RAND professors and students created a tool with the potential to help make aid initiatives more effective.

  • Andreyeva Examines Health Impact of Government Food Programs

    Oct 12, 2016

    Participants in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) assistance program have increased their purchase of healthy food items since the program's revision in 2009, according to research by alum Tatiana Andreyeva (cohort '01) published in the journal Preventive Medicine.

  • Q&A with Thorpe on NCDs in India

    Oct 10, 2016

    Alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80), chairman of the Partnership to Fight Chronic Diseases, discussed the economic and overall burden of non-communicable diseases and low expenditure on public health in India.

  • How to Rethink Data Privacy

    Oct 5, 2016

    Society benefits from the exchange of large-scale data in many ways. Anonymization is the usual mechanism for addressing the privacy of data subjects. Unfortunately, according to professors Osonde Osoba and John Davis, anonymization is broken.

  • How to Be Safer in the Arctic

    Oct 3, 2016

    The Arctic is more accessible than it once was, but it's still a formidable place to travel. An emergency involving a cruise ship or a downed plane could stress the search-and-rescue system. But modest investments and planning measures can make a big difference, write alum Timothy Smith (cohort '13) and prof. Abbie Tingstad.

  • Estimating the Impacts of the Trump and Clinton Health Plans

    Sep 23, 2016

    An analysis by Prof. Christine Eibner of the proposed health care plans of the two major parties' presidential candidates estimated the likely effects of each policy relative to the ACA in 2018 on the number of people covered, consumer out-of-pocket spending, and the federal deficit.

  • How to Prevent Drones Colliding in Crowded Skies

    Sep 14, 2016

    The federal government should work with private firms to develop drone traffic management systems and test drone designs, write professors Kenneth Kuhn, William Welser, and Jia Xu. This could help stimulate the development of drone aviation. It could also help modernize the air traffic control system.

  • Central Bank Perversity: The Downside to Aggressive Monetary Policy

    Sep 13, 2016

    Aggressive monetary policy has negative effects on retirees, on income inequality, and on market stability—both domestically and globally—writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • Your Questions About Marijuana Legalization, Answered

    Sep 13, 2016

    At least five states will vote on legal recreational marijuana this November. Drug policy expert and Pardee RAND professor Beau Kilmer hosted an “Ask Me Anything” session on Reddit to shed light on this and other issues.

  • The Precarious State of Syrian Refugee Women, Children in Lebanon

    Sep 13, 2016

    While the gendered impact of political conflict on women and children has been well-documented in other conflicts, much less is known about the effect the Syrian civil war is having on women and children displaced by the conflict, writes Mahlet Atakilt Woldetsadik (cohort '13).

  • Summer 2016 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Sep 8, 2016

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about our successful Be the Answer campaign, new courses for the new school year, CoCom efforts to support students, our latest Brown Faculty Fellow, and more.

  • Zanini Quantifies Cost of Excess Management

    Sep 5, 2016

    According to research by alum Michele Zanini (cohort '96) published in the Harvard Business Review, "bureaucracy creates a significant drag on productivity and organizational resilience and innovation" and costs the United States $3 trillion per year.

  • How 'Star Trek' Inspired a Boy to Become a Scientist

    Aug 26, 2016

    Prof. William Marcellino discusses how “Star Trek” convinced him at an early age that science and the advancement of human knowledge could make the world a better place.