Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Five Myths About American Obesity

    Mar 13, 2017

    Two in three Americans are overweight or obese. There are popular theories about what's causing the obesity epidemic but research does not support them. What is clear, write alum Ruopeng An (cohort '08) and professor Roland Sturm, is that most U.S. adults eat too many calories.

  • On 'Hidden Figures' and Being the Only Woman in the Room

    Mar 12, 2017

    A new film tells the true story of talented women who experienced racial and gender discrimination at NASA in the early 1960s. Like many women, they gained acceptance over time by being great at what they do. Dean Susan Marquis writes that women at RAND have also been pioneers in their fields and are familiar with being the only woman in the room.

  • Winter 2017 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Mar 10, 2017

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about the Charles Wolf memorial, our distinguished visiting professors, a new tech lab and design studio, an upcoming APPAM student conference, and more.

  • Alumni Evaluate the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan

    Mar 9, 2017

    The Jinan Municipal Water Resources Bureau, with support from the Shandong Provincial Department of Water Resources, asked RAND to evaluate potential effects of demand and climate uncertainties on investments recently undertaken according to the Jinan City Water Ecological Development Implementation Plan. The research team, which included alumni David Groves (cohort '01) and Zhimin Mao (cohort '11) as well as professors Debra Knopman and Nidhi Kalra, also assessed the potential of new investments and management strategies to help Jinan meet its long-term water resources goals.

  • Death by Nerve Gas: Two Arrests, Many Questions in Attack in Malaysia

    Mar 7, 2017

    Details about the murder of Kim Jong-Un's half-brother are still being uncovered. If a firm connection to North Korea can be made, others in the region should react strongly. writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75). Otherwise, Kim may conclude that further provocations are worth it.

  • Innovation in the Bay Area: Q&A with Nidhi Kalra

    Mar 7, 2017

    Prof. Nidhi Kalra discusses what Silicon Valley startups and policy researchers have in common, whether test-driving autonomous vehicles could really prove their safety, and more.

  • Assessing the Needs of Massachusetts' Veterans

    Mar 7, 2017

    Student Erin Duffy (cohort '15) and fellow researchers assessed the needs of Massachusetts veterans to help inform state investments in services and guide efforts to remedy barriers to access.

  • Four Alumni Visit to Discuss Careers

    Mar 6, 2017

    Thanks to the efforts of the Career Services Advisory Committee, four alumni — Loren Yager (cohort '87), Ying Liu ('04), Eric Jesse ('08), and Jon Wong ('12) — visited Pardee RAND during the winter quarter to discuss their varied careers.

  • Distinguished Visiting Professors Inspire Students

    Mar 6, 2017

    Winter Quarter brought three dynamic minds to Pardee RAND — NYU's Paul Light, Harvard's Martin Feldstein, and Stanford's Alain Enthoven — as well as discussions of government reform and its effects, income growth and distribution, and systems analysis and design.

  • U.S.-Japan Defense Relations Under Trump

    Mar 3, 2017

    U.S.–Japan relations appear to be stabilizing after a successful visit by Defense Secretary James Mattis to Tokyo that reaffirmed the alliance, followed by an equally successful visit by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to the U.S. Next, asks prof. Scott Harold, will the Trump administration articulate goals for the region?

  • What Data Is the Government Keeping About You?

    Mar 1, 2017

    Governments are amassing a wealth of data on citizens, a trend that will continue as technology advances. But with no reliable way to ensure that the data is accurate, notes professor Brian Jackson, risks abound. In the criminal justice system, for example, poor quality data could affect individual freedoms and employability.

  • What It Takes to Deter Russian Aggression in the Baltics

    Mar 1, 2017

    The United States and NATO face several challenges in deterring Russia in the Baltics. Solving these is vital to achieving core U.S. objectives in Europe. The first step, says professor David Shlapak, is to ensure that NATO can stay in the game and deny Moscow an easy strategic victory.

  • School Introduces Design Studio and a Tech Lab

    Feb 27, 2017

    As Pardee RAND continues to expand and reimagine the curriculum, two exciting initiatives are currently underway. The winter session saw the pilot of our first design studio course, and the spring will see the launch of a Tech Lab to serve as a hub of innovation and experimentation for both students and faculty.

  • Uncertainty and Complexity: Biomass Can Help on the Path to Deep Decarbonization

    Feb 24, 2017

    While biomass will almost certainly never become the dominant fuel for the electricity sector in the United States, it is still worth including as part of a menu of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, write student Sara Turner (cohort '15) and prof. Aimee Curtright.

  • Does the Court System Know as Much About ESI as Your Teenager? It Should.

    Feb 21, 2017

    Electronically stored information (ESI) from smart appliances, fitness trackers, and other devices is making its way into the U.S. court system. Judges and lawyers need to better understand this evidence so they can challenge it or rule on its admissibility in court, writes Prof. Brian Jackson.

  • Community Colleges Can Be 'First Responders' in Retraining Displaced Workers

    Feb 16, 2017

    Many of the occupations with the most career opportunities require two-year degrees or certificates, such as those in health care and technology. Alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05) says community colleges play a key role in training students for these jobs, and offer an environment that is supportive of displaced and dissatisfied workers.

  • Should the Definition of Health Include a Measure of Tolerance?

    Feb 15, 2017

    Involving the medical community in helping to measure and increase tolerance could help make individuals and communities healthier. Since hate is both deadly and contagious, now is the time to engage the medical profession in eradicating it, writes Prof. Robert Brook.

  • Assessment of the Civilian Acquisition Workforce Personnel Demonstration Project

    Feb 15, 2017

    Student Cameron Wright (cohort '12), alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), and professor Laura Werber joined forces with RAND colleagues to assess DoD's AcqDemo, finding several aspects of the program that are performing well but also areas that could be improved.

  • Realizing Autonomous Vehicle Safety

    Feb 14, 2017

    Autonomous vehicles hold enormous promise for transportation safety, said professor Nidhi Kalra in her testimony to Congress. But feasible, sound methods of testing need to be developed. In the meantime, policymakers should work to foster the development of self-driving vehicles while lowering their risks.

  • Trends in Inequality and the World's Eight Richest Men

    Feb 10, 2017

    While Oxfam reports have done a good job of bringing attention to the problem of inequality, they may give the false impression that global inequality has been rising instead of falling, writes Prof. Ernesto Amaral. Global inequality has actually been on the decline while inequality within the developed world is increasing.

  • Mattis' Mission in Asia

    Feb 6, 2017

    U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis made his first overseas trip this week, visiting Japan and South Korea. Prof. Scott Harold says Mattis reassured them that U.S. alliances in East Asia will remain strong, while also clarifying Washington's expectations.

  • How to Counter Transnational Criminal Networks

    Jan 27, 2017

    Transnational criminal networks have expanded their global reach. In some cases, they have even converged with terrorist groups. Research by alum Gregory Midgette (cohort '09) and RAND colleagues examines how these networks threaten U.S. interests and what can be done to combat them.

  • What 32 Million Tweets Tell Us About Health and the Twitterverse

    Jan 26, 2017

    Health-related posts and conversations on Twitter shed light on the public's views on obesity, exercise and fitness, safe sex, alcohol, and mental health. Prof. Douglas Yeung asks, will such discussion increase in communities where health and wellness programs are put in place?

  • Helping Soldiers Use Army Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities in Civilian Jobs

    Jan 24, 2017

    Some veterans struggle to find jobs after they leave the Army. Alum Michael Shanley (cohort '79) helped to identify a broad range of high-quality civilian jobs that match Army KSAs.

  • China Stressed a Growing Interest in Global Trade and Governance at Davos

    Jan 24, 2017

    President Xi Jinping became the first Chinese leader to appear at the annual gathering of the World Economic Forum last week. He gave a keynote speech that defended global trade and criticized protectionism. Prof. Timothy Heath says his speech reflected, in part, the reality that China has profited enormously from decades of globalization.