Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Fatal Crash Shouldn't Kill Self-Driving Cars

    Jul 16, 2016

    The first known fatality in an autonomous vehicle occurred on May 7 and raises important questions. It does not, however, mean that self-driving cars are less safe than human drivers or that development of the technology should be stopped, writes Prof. Nidhi Kalra.

  • Commencement Issue of Findings Features New Alumni

    Jul 7, 2016

    Eight students joined the ranks of Pardee RAND alumni since the last issue of Findings went to press; they and 37 others (a total of 45 Ph.D. grads and 46 additional M.Phil. recipients) are celebrated in this Commencement issue of our quarterly alumni newsletter.

  • Should Some Californians Lose Their 'License to Drink'?

    Jul 6, 2016

    In California, many efforts to reduce repeat drunken driving focus on the driving. Prof. Beau Kilmer asks, What if the state targeted the “drunk” aspect instead?

  • Revisiting Restrictions on Blood Donations from Gay and Bisexual Men

    Jul 5, 2016

    The FDA does not accept blood from male donors who have had sex with a man in the previous 12 months. This has led to an ongoing debate about whether this restriction is supported by scientific evidence or, as some have argued, related to lingering stigma and discrimination related to HIV/AIDS, writes Prof. Sarah MacCarthy.

  • Grasping the Brexit Moment for Free Trade

    Jul 1, 2016

    The United Kingdom's surprising vote to exit the EU turned another tricky day into a possible social crisis. But where there is crisis, there is also opportunity, and the vote presents an opening for another step forward of global trade and investment liberalization, writes Prof. Howard Shatz.

  • Young Workers Without College Degrees Face Uncomfortable Truths

    Jun 23, 2016

    Young Americans without a college education suffer from high unemployment, low earnings, and delayed adulthood with a limited ability to buy a home. To help them, policymakers need to remind themselves that workforce training and labor policy must focus on the technology-driven jobs of tomorrow, writes student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15).

  • Don't Learn the Wrong Lessons from Rapid Acquisition

    Jun 23, 2016

    Rapid acquisition practices that worked during recent wars may not easily translate to peacetime endeavors. Enthusiasm for rapid acquisition must be tempered by an understanding of the circumstances that made it work and the downsides that were accepted in wartime, writes alum Jon Wong (cohort '12).

  • Brooks Receives Third Biennial Leadership Award

    Jun 20, 2016

    Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) received the Pardee RAND Alumni Leadership Award during the 2016 Commencement Weekend in June.

  • Countering Extremism: Early Childhood Education Forgotten

    Jun 8, 2016

    Global attention has turned to education as a way to counter extremism, but what has been missing from these conversations is a focus on learning in children's first years, when much brain development occurs, writes Prof. Rita Karam. In the Middle East and North Africa, government underinvestment in formal programs for young children is the norm.

  • China's Yuan as a Reserve Currency: Boon or Bane for the Dollar?

    Jun 3, 2016

    Establishing a system in which two reserve currencies compete with each other to affect global decisions about reserve holdings may lead to greater financial stability than the present dollar-dominated system, writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • ISIS and Dirty Bombs

    Jun 3, 2016

    There has been growing concern that terrorists might use radiological sources to create a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). Prof. Gregory Jones explains that calculations have shown that an attack would be unlikely to produce radioactive contamination sufficient to kill or even injure anyone, but there would be psychological and economic effects.

  • RAND's Lillian Ablon Presents 'Lessons from a Hacker'

    Jun 1, 2016

    Prof. Lillian Ablon, a cybersecurity and emerging technologies researcher, spoke at a RAND Policy Circle Conversation on the world's expanding cyber vulnerability, those who are out there to take advantage of those vulnerabilities, as well as consumer attitudes toward breaches.

  • Good (Fast) Food as a Vehicle for Social Change

    Jun 1, 2016

    Neighborhood by neighborhood, a few dozen jobs at a time, two celebrity chefs are tackling complex and persistent public policy problems. They could succeed in their own way in communities where generations of government programs and charity have had limited impact, writes Dean Susan Marquis.

  • Why Has Obama Lifted the Arms Sales Ban on Vietnam?

    May 25, 2016

    The lifting of the Vietnam arms embargo needs to be understood as part of the long process of normalizing relations with a former U.S. enemy and building toward a more cooperative, economically dynamic, and strategic future-oriented relationship, writes Prof. Scott Harold.

  • Did We Improve Veterans Health Care? It's Unclear

    May 24, 2016

    The Veterans Choice program was designed to expedite veterans' access to health care and relieve pressure on the VA system. Before making the program permanent, writes Prof. Susan Hosek, the VA should better understand its effectiveness.

  • 5 Things That Should Happen When Obama Visits Hiroshima

    May 23, 2016

    On May 27, President Barack Obama will be the first sitting U.S. president to visit the city of Hiroshima. As Prof. Scott Harold writes, the visit is a sign of respect and friendship between the American and Japanese people, and should make the two countries' ties even stronger.

  • Want Better Health Coverage? Change Your ZIP Code

    May 23, 2016

    Medicare's reliance on private contractors to run the program exacerbates the nation's health disparities by denying Americans in certain states access to life-saving medical advances, writes alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80).

  • Making the 'Gap Year' More Inclusive and Purposeful

    May 19, 2016

    High schools and universities should work together, with the support of policymakers, to develop programs that would provide a wider spectrum of U.S. students with the opportunity to take a purposeful gap year—and enter college with some real-world adult experience behind them, writes Prof. Louay Constant.

  • How Can Gaming Help Test Your Theory?

    May 18, 2016

    The act of designing a game will force you to articulate your theory or to be more specific about it, writes Yuna Wong (cohort '00). It will also require you to operationalize your variables and theoretical constructs of interest into a specific context, and prompt you to anticipate the ways in which it may play out in that scenario.

  • Behind North Korea's Bid for a 'Peace Treaty'

    May 18, 2016

    By insisting on a peace treaty with America, North Korea is probably seeking war, writes professor and alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75). Its leaders likely hope a treaty would lead to a withdrawal of U.S. forces from South Korea, setting the stage for an invasion by the North.

  • The Hidden Costs of Pension Plan Reform

    May 18, 2016

    While there are many policy options that may decrease pension liabilities for Chicago and cities and states in similar situations, writes Prof. Jim Hosek, some options being considered may also have serious consequences for the public sector workforce, now and in the future.

  • Partitioning Iraq: Make a Detailed Case, or Cease and Desist

    May 16, 2016

    The mostly non-Iraqi voices who want to divide the country into three ethno-sectarian cantonments—Shi'a, Sunni, and Kurd—owe the Iraqi people extensive, detailed clarification. If neither the Iraqi Arab polity nor Iraq's most powerful political factions seek three-way partition, writes Prof. Ben Connable, then the case should be closed.

  • What Are the Public Health Consequences of Legalizing Marijuana?

    May 16, 2016

    Legalizing and allowing profit-maximizing firms to produce, sell, and advertise recreational marijuana would likely increase marijuana consumption. Prof. Beau Kilmer considers how this increased consumption would influence the use of other substances.

  • Alum Offers a Sobering Look at the Opioid Epidemic

    May 13, 2016

    Opioid overdoses were the greatest cause of accidental death in America in 2014. Alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97) participated in a panel discussion at RAND that addressed the epidemic, including societal attitudes toward pain and addiction, poor understanding of the mechanics of addiction itself, economic drivers, legal responses, and treatment approaches.

  • Interactive Map Highlights Research Related to Global Human Progress

    May 13, 2016

    Through the Pardee Initiative, Pardee RAND students and RAND researchers conduct extensive work and write about global human development efforts in more than 75 countries around the world. An interactive map allows users to learn more about—and more easily access—that research.