Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • CERP Projects in Afghanistan Proved Effective

    Oct 13, 2016

    Projects under the Commander's Emergency Response Program in Afghanistan ranged from rehabilitating a local well to hydro dam and reservoir restoration. The ability of the U.S. military to provide humanitarian relief and reconstruction services enhanced the operational effectiveness of U.S. forces there, according to research by student Kathleen Loa (cohort '12), professor Daniel Egel, and RAND colleagues.

  • Andreyeva Examines Health Impact of Government Food Programs

    Oct 13, 2016

    Participants in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) assistance program have increased their purchase of healthy food items since the program's revision in 2009, according to research by alum Tatiana Andreyeva (cohort '01) published in the journal Preventive Medicine.

  • Q&A with Thorpe on NCDs in India

    Oct 11, 2016

    Alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80), chairman of the Partnership to Fight Chronic Diseases, discussed the economic and overall burden of non-communicable diseases and low expenditure on public health in India.

  • Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mindfulness Meditation for Chronic Pain

    Oct 7, 2016

    Using mindfulness meditation to treat chronic pain improves pain symptoms, depression, and quality of life, according to a study by students Eric Apaydin and Benjamin Colaiaco (both cohort '11) and professors Susanne Hempel and Sydne Newberry. More research is necessary, however, to determine the degree of effectiveness.

  • Evaluating Meditation Interventions for Posttraumatic Stress

    Oct 7, 2016

    Meditation appears to be effective in treating PTSD and depression symptoms, but more research is necessary, according to a systematic review by students Benjamin Colaiaco and Eric Apaydin (both cohort '11) and professor Susanne Hempel.

  • Announcing the 2016-17 Dissertation Awards

    Oct 6, 2016

    The Dean and the Dissertation Award Selection Committee recently announced the Pardee RAND Dissertation Award recipients for academic year 2016-17. Thanks to the School's generous supporters and friends, Pardee RAND was able to provide 26 awards totaling nearly $350,000 across a range of important policy topics.

  • How to Rethink Data Privacy

    Oct 5, 2016

    Society benefits from the exchange of large-scale data in many ways. Anonymization is the usual mechanism for addressing the privacy of data subjects. Unfortunately, according to professors Osonde Osoba and John Davis, anonymization is broken.

  • Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Fall Prevention Intervention

    Oct 5, 2016

    Alum Daniel A. Waxman (cohort '10) and student Xiaoyu Nie (cohort '14) evaluated a fall prevention intervention but found no significant reduction in costs or emergency room visits.

  • Security Sector Reform in Ukraine

    Oct 5, 2016

    The 2014 Maidan revolution created an opportunity for change in a system that had resisted it for 25 years. Jakub Hlavka and Andriy Bega (both cohort '14) contributed to a report that found the Ukrainian security establishment has progressed since then, but its efforts have been insufficient to address the threats now facing the nation.

  • How to Be Safer in the Arctic

    Oct 3, 2016

    The Arctic is more accessible than it once was, but it's still a formidable place to travel. An emergency involving a cruise ship or a downed plane could stress the search-and-rescue system. But modest investments and planning measures can make a big difference, write alum Timothy Smith (cohort '13) and prof. Abbie Tingstad.

  • Workers' Compensation Reforms Helped Replace Wages and Offset Earnings Losses After the Great Recession

    Sep 27, 2016

    California workers' compensation law is likely succeeding in providing additional benefits for permanently disabled workers, and has helped to offset the impact of the Great Recession, according to research by alum Ujwal Kharel (cohort '11).

  • Estimating the Impacts of the Trump and Clinton Health Plans

    Sep 23, 2016

    An analysis by Prof. Christine Eibner of the proposed health care plans of the two major parties' presidential candidates estimated the likely effects of each policy relative to the ACA in 2018 on the number of people covered, consumer out-of-pocket spending, and the federal deficit.

  • Physicians with Waivers to Prescribe Buprenorphine for Opioid Addiction Have Capacity to Treat More Patients

    Sep 20, 2016

    Many American physicians who prescribe buprenorphine to treat individuals addicted to opioids are prescribing substantially below the patient limits allowed by law, according to research by alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97). More than 20 percent of waivered physicians treated only three or fewer patients.

  • How to Prevent Drones Colliding in Crowded Skies

    Sep 14, 2016

    The federal government should work with private firms to develop drone traffic management systems and test drone designs, write professors Kenneth Kuhn, William Welser, and Jia Xu. This could help stimulate the development of drone aviation. It could also help modernize the air traffic control system.

  • Central Bank Perversity: The Downside to Aggressive Monetary Policy

    Sep 13, 2016

    Aggressive monetary policy has negative effects on retirees, on income inequality, and on market stability—both domestically and globally—writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • Your Questions About Marijuana Legalization, Answered

    Sep 13, 2016

    At least five states will vote on legal recreational marijuana this November. Drug policy expert and Pardee RAND professor Beau Kilmer hosted an “Ask Me Anything” session on Reddit to shed light on this and other issues.

  • The Precarious State of Syrian Refugee Women, Children in Lebanon

    Sep 13, 2016

    While the gendered impact of political conflict on women and children has been well-documented in other conflicts, much less is known about the effect the Syrian civil war is having on women and children displaced by the conflict, writes Mahlet Atakilt Woldetsadik (cohort '13).

  • Which Countries Could Become Disease Hot Spots?

    Sep 12, 2016

    Identifying and focusing on vulnerable countries that could become hot spots for infectious disease could help in the fight against future outbreaks. Students Bill Gelfeld (cohort '14) and Yemi Okunogbe (cohort '13) teamed up with professors Melinda Moore and Chris Paul to do just that.

  • Summer 2016 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Sep 8, 2016

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about our successful Be the Answer campaign, new courses for the new school year, CoCom efforts to support students, our latest Brown Faculty Fellow, and more.

  • Little Research Exists on UK Service Leavers’ Transition to Civilian Life

    Sep 8, 2016

    The Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) supports families of UK Service leavers as they transition to civilian life. Research by Brent Anderson (cohort '14) and Prof. Agnes Schafer found that to help the FiMT, more research is needed in the areas of family engagement, family breakdown, housing and spousal employment.

  • Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching: Interim Report on Student Outcomes

    Sep 7, 2016

    Through 2013-2014, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching initiative had a limited impact. But the recent upward trajectory in student outcomes suggests that reforms implemented as part of the study might be on the way to having a positive effect, according to research by Gabriel Weinberger (cohort '13) and professor Italo Gutierrez.

  • Zanini Quantifies Cost of Excess Management

    Sep 6, 2016

    According to research by alum Michele Zanini (cohort '96) published in the Harvard Business Review, "bureaucracy creates a significant drag on productivity and organizational resilience and innovation" and costs the United States $3 trillion per year.

  • How 'Star Trek' Inspired a Boy to Become a Scientist

    Aug 26, 2016

    Prof. William Marcellino discusses how “Star Trek” convinced him at an early age that science and the advancement of human knowledge could make the world a better place.

  • Using High-Performance Computing to Support Water Resource Planning

    Aug 25, 2016

    Alum David Groves (cohort '01) and Prof. Rob Lempert, along with researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, tested five different water management portfolios such as conservation, groundwater and seawater desalination, and water reuse, against thousands of scenarios reflecting uncertainty about future climate change and development patterns.

  • Engineering a Roadmap for Health Information Technology in Chile

    Aug 25, 2016

    Emilio Chavez-Herrerias (cohort '14) and Fernando Hoces de la Guardia (cohort '13) worked with RAND colleagues to develop a roadmap with five objectives for the Chilean government to expand its health information technology capabilities over the next ten years.