Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Self-Driving Vehicles Offer Potential Benefits, Policy Challenges for Lawmakers

    Jan 6, 2014

    Student Tobi Oluwatola (cohort '12) contributed to research that shows self-driving vehicles offer the promise of significant benefits to society but raise several policy challenges. Among these challenges are the need to update insurance liability regulations and privacy concerns such as who will control the data generated by this technology.

  • Five Myths About Obesity

    Dec 27, 2013

    Although the obesity epidemic has generated a lot of attention and calls for solutions, it also has served up its share of myths and misunderstandings. Pardee RAND faculty Deb Cohen illustrates some important policy implications.

  • Faculty member Ed Keating: Investing in Firefighting

    Dec 23, 2013

    A 2012 RAND report advised the U.S. Forest Service to transition to scooper aircraft; in this commentary, he evaluates the changes that have happened since the recommendation.

  • Professor Stijn Hoorens' Long-Term View for the EU: The Health of Nations

    Dec 18, 2013

    A new report advocates that by shifting the strategic focus beyond growth and jobs, the successor of the current Europe 2020 Strategy should aim to invest in human capital and avoid sluggish productivity growth achieved at the expense of social inclusion, public health, education and skills, security or freedom.

  • Auerbach: Is There Really a Physician Shortage?

    Dec 5, 2013

    Faculty member David Auerbach examines the reignited concerns about physician shortages resulting from coverage expansions under the ACA, and finds the models do not necessarily imply that intervening to boost physician supply would be worth the investment.

  • Seth Jones and Keith Crane: Afghanistan After the Drawdown

    Nov 27, 2013

    The United States should maintain roughly 8,000–12,000 troops in Afghanistan after 2014 to manage the complex political, security, and economic challenges that will accompany the reduction in forces, say Seth Jones and Keith Crane.

  • Quick Takes: The Convenience Revolution in the Treatment of Minor Health Problems

    Nov 26, 2013

    Convenient options for treating minor health problems are an important new feature of the health care landscape. Pardee RAND professor Ateev Mehrotra discusses these options and their implications for the medical marketplace.

  • Dubowitz and Chandra: Here's to Our Health

    Nov 24, 2013

    Pardee RAND Faculty Anita Chandra and Tamara Dubowitz salute Pittsburgh's new mayor and his mission to make Pittsburgh healthier. They advocate using scientific and medical evidence to shape an integrated, citywide, health-policy framework.

  • Agrarian Development and Public Policy in West Bengal, India

    Nov 22, 2013

    From 1980-2000, West Bengal was affected by land reform policies that gave surplus land to the landless, protected tenants, and provided cheap credit, seeds and fertilizer. In this IDSS podcast, Dilip Mookherjee of Boston University looks at the effects of these policies and what the future may hold.

  • Bruce Bennett Discusses North Korea on Reddit.com

    Nov 14, 2013

    To shed some light on Kim Jong-un's possible motivations—and to discuss what might happen if the North Korean government suddenly collapsed the way East Germany's did—Pardee RAND alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) took part in a question and answer session on Reddit.com.

  • Tool Helps Defense Planners Match Priorities for Security Cooperation

    Nov 6, 2013

    PRGS student Jessica Yeats (cohort '10) worked with PRGS professor Christopher Paul and other RAND researchers to develop a tool for U.S. defense planners to augment their strategic planning efforts as they evaluate current and proposed security cooperation efforts.

  • Robust Decision Making Enables Colorado River Planners to Ensure Water Reliability

    Nov 5, 2013

    Pardee RAND student Evan Bloom (cohort '09), professors/alumni David Groves (cohort '01) and Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04), and professors Rob Lempert and Debra Knopman worked with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to evaluate the resiliency of the Colorado River system over the next 50 years.

  • Applying Robust Decision Making: Planning for Water and Flood Risk Management

    Nov 5, 2013

    Robust Decision Making is used in a wide range of applications, most critically in water and flood risk management. Here, Pardee RAND professors Robert Lempert and David Groves (cohort '01) discuss two key projects where RAND applied RDM to look at potential futures: the Colorado River Basin, and Ho Chi Minh City.

  • Monopoly and Micro-Irrigation in Smallholder Water Markets

    Oct 30, 2013

    Many rural agricultural areas around the world are facing severely depleted groundwater resources, which farmers rely on for irrigation. This dissertation explores the changes that would follow a move to formalize water markets and establish tradable water rights.

  • Capacity Management and Changing Requirements - Cost Effective Decision Making in an Uncertain World

    Oct 30, 2013

    Currently, the Air Force faces a problem of excess capacity with the fleet able to provide more airlift than needed under the requirement provided by MCRS-16. In response to the excess capability, policy makers have decided to retire C-5As with remaining service life.

  • Rising Cost of Flood Insurance Will Create Serious Challenges for New York City

    Oct 25, 2013

    Research by Pardee RAND student David Manheim and RAND colleagues indicates some New York City residents may face increases of up to $10,000 annually in their flood insurance premiums as a result of major changes occurring in the National Flood Insurance Program and the redrawing of flood maps that expand the areas at risk.

  • Mark Schuster Elected to the Institute of Medicine

    Oct 25, 2013

    Pardee RAND alum Dr. Mark Schuster (cohort '91) has been elected to the Institute of Medicine. He is an adjunct researcher at RAND and the William Berenberg Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Chief of General Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Health Policy in the Department of Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital.

  • Student Assesses Partisan Geographic Sorting in California

    Oct 23, 2013

    After examining microgeographic voting and party registration data from California, PRGS student Jesse Sussell (cohort '10) found that Republicans and Democrats are becoming increasingly geographically segregated from one another. His research was published in PS, the journal of the American Political Science Association.

  • The Role of Economic Development Zones in National Development Strategies: The Case of China

    Oct 18, 2013

    Based on a systematic review of the historical data and policies for economic development zones in China, this dissertation creates a unique classification system for the development path of these zones and identified four distinct phases.

  • Policy Impacts on Wind and Solar Innovation

    Oct 16, 2013

    Predicting the effects of climate policies on energy use and the economy requires understanding how they will affect innovation. This study helps fill research gaps by using the number of relevant academic journal articles published per month as a proxy for innovation in wind and solar energy.

  • Quality of Patient Care Drives Physician Satisfaction; Doctors Have Concerns About Electronic Health Records

    Oct 9, 2013

    Being able to provide high-quality health care is a primary driver of job satisfaction among physicians, and obstacles to quality patient care are a source of stress for them. For example, the systems for electronic health records in use today are cumbersome to operate and contribute to their dissatisfaction, according to research by PRGS student John Caloyeras (cohort '09) and RAND colleagues.

  • Opt-In, Opt-Out; Why Not Forced Choice?

    Oct 8, 2013

    By default, browsers generally are set to automatically allow online tracking, but there may be a better way to make sure consumers decide whether or not they want to allow advertisers to sniff at their digital footprints, writes PRGS student Steven Isley (cohort '10).

  • Ringel Honored with Huddleson Outstanding Teacher Award

    Sep 24, 2013

    Students selected Pardee RAND professor Jeanne Ringel as the Huddleson Award recipient for a core course and Annie Boustead (cohort '11) as the Outstanding TA Award recipient for 2013. Students in the 2011 and 2012 cohorts voted on the Huddleson Award recipient, and all students were eligible to vote for the Outstanding TA Award.

  • Assessing China's Foreign Aid and Government-Sponsored Investment Activities

    Sep 18, 2013

    With the world's second largest economy, China has the capacity to engage in substantial programs of development assistance and government investment in any and all of the emerging-market countries. PRGS students Xiao Wang (cohort '08) and Eric Warner (cohort '10), as well as professor Charles Wolf Jr., assessed the scale, trends, and composition of these programs in 93 countries in six regions.

  • To Stop Prisons' Revolving Door

    Sep 16, 2013

    If California wants to reduce its prison population, it needs to address recidivism, and the best way to do this is through education and job training, writes PRGS professor Lois Davis. Cutting education and vocational training may seem like a tempting way to plug short-term budget gaps, but it actually ends up costing the system more over time.