Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Cracks in the Chinese Powerhouse

    Dec 19, 2016

    Like most countries that have experienced rapid development, China is struggling to transition from a highly successful but unsustainable economic model. Beijing faces the additional challenge of executing difficult reforms in the face of an inhospitable global economy, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Pardee RAND Celebrates Season with Festive Party

    Dec 19, 2016

    Students, alumni, faculty, and staff rang in the 2016 holiday season in true Pardee RAND style on December 8. Students Etienne Rosas (cohort '14) and Claire O'Hanlon (cohort 13), alum Eric Larson (cohort '89) and executive assistant Jennifer Prim provided live musical entertainment for the many attendees.

  • Insuring Younger Adults Through the ACA's Marketplaces: Options to Expand Enrollment

    Dec 16, 2016

    Whether or not the Affordable Care Act is repealed, having young adults participate in the individual health insurance market remains critical to achieving affordable premiums for everyone, writes Prof. Christine Eibner.

  • Remembering Our Founding Dean, Charles Wolf, Jr.

    Dec 16, 2016

    Charles Wolf, Jr. passed away on October 24, 2016. He was 92. Over his 60 years at RAND, Wolf was a teacher, mentor, and friend to countless students, alumni, staff, and professors. He has left behind a tremendous legacy that is greatly missed.

  • Support for Postsecondary Education in Prison

    Dec 15, 2016

    Correctional educational programs can reduce incarceration costs and recidivism. But it's critical that former inmates can connect with reentry services in the community to complete their education, writes professor Lois Davis.

  • The Future of Artificial Intelligence

    Dec 14, 2016

    In this Events @ RAND podcast, three Pardee RAND professors discuss the role AI is playing in society, including the incredible promise and pressing concerns.

  • Improving School Leadership Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

    Dec 13, 2016

    School leadership is acknowledged as a valid target of educational-improvement activities in the Every Student Succeeds Act, allowing funds to be spent on strengthening it. An updated analysis by students Aziza Arifkhanova, Andriy Bega, Emilio Chavez-Herrerias, Eugene Han and RAND colleagues provides education policymakers with guidance on the use of research-based school leadership programs.

  • Making American Education Great Will Require More Than Charter Schools

    Dec 13, 2016

    The nomination of Betsy DeVos for U.S. Secretary of Education has shone a spotlight on charter schools, writes professor Darleen Opfer. While charters could become an important part of a great education system, this burst of attention poses a risk that other issues will be ignored.

  • The Risks of an Accelerating Rivalry Between China and Japan

    Dec 12, 2016

    China and Japan have a long history of antagonism but their competition for influence in Asia has recently expanded in the economic, diplomatic, and security domains. The U.S., although a staunch ally of Japan, has served as a mediator. Weakening the U.S. role could aggravate Sino-Japanese tensions to a destabilizing degree, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • How States and Districts Can Leverage the Every Student Succeeds Act to Improve School Leadership

    Dec 12, 2016

    The Every Student Succeeds Act provides states and districts with new chances to invest in school leadership. A review of interventions can serve as a starting point to enact relevant solutions and build the evidence base for what works, writes professor Susan Gates.

  • Putting Health into the Health Care Debate

    Dec 10, 2016

    How much return is the United States getting for spending over 17 percent of its gross domestic product on health care? Not nearly enough, says professor and alum Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85), vice president and director of RAND Health. The health care debate should focus on improving population health and ensuring the country is getting the biggest bang for its bucks.

  • Investing in Infrastructure? Don't Forget the Electric Grid

    Dec 7, 2016

    To maximize the potential benefits of a multibillion-dollar smart grid investment, student Kathleen Loa (cohort '12) and professor Aimee Curtright say a closer examination of technology and policy is needed. First, weigh the preferences and constraints of the various stakeholders and how technology can or cannot meet their objectives.

  • Changes to Kids' Menus May Help Curb Childhood Obesity

    Dec 5, 2016

    Most kids' menu items at the top 200 U.S. restaurant chains exceed the calorie counts recommended by nutrition experts, according to research by student Cameron Wright (cohort '12) and professor Deborah Cohen. The restaurant industry can embrace calorie guidelines to promote children's health and reduce childhood obesity.

  • One-Stop Social Services Efforts May Improve Community College Outcomes

    Nov 30, 2016

    Students participating in programs that provide a comprehensive range of support services are more likely to persist in attending community college, according to research by alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05).

  • Distinguished Professors to Visit Campus

    Nov 30, 2016

    Pardee RAND will welcome four Distinguished Visiting Professors next quarter. Stanford's Alain Enthoven, Harvard and NBER's Martin Feldstein, and NYU's Paul Light will each be in residence at Pardee RAND this winter. The Ohio State University's Ann Pendleton-Jullian will be visiting until June.

  • Building a More Sustainable U.S. Blood System

    Nov 28, 2016

    Medical advances have dramatically reduced demand for blood, putting financial stress on blood centers. Student Jakub Hlavka (cohort '14) and colleagues examine how policymakers can ensure the safety and sustainability of the blood supply.

  • Thorpe Says Schools Can End America’s Health Crisis

    Nov 18, 2016

    Schools are uniquely situated to whip kids into shape, writes alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80), chairman of the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease. Children spend most days at school — and typically have at least one meal there. So teachers and administrators could provide students with the resources to stay healthy.

  • To Increase Diversity in Tech, We Need to Rethink What 'Tech' Is

    Nov 17, 2016

    The tech sector is a driving force for high-skill, high-wage job creation in the United States, but too few women and minorities reap the gains. Rethinking what defines today's tech jobs, along with greater investment in public-private partnerships, could go a long way toward bridging the diversity gap, writes student Diana Gehlhaus Carew (cohort '15).

  • Ghez: U.S. Tech Giants Might Not Dominate the World After All

    Nov 17, 2016

    In Forbes, alum Jeremy Ghez (cohort '06) writes that Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon are each trying to impose the most long-lasting business model that will lock in consumers for an extended period of time. But they are not infallible.

  • Montoya Seeks Deeds, Not Words, to Help Countries Measure Learning

    Nov 17, 2016

    Looking at Sustainable Development Indicators, alum Silvia Montoya (cohort '06), director of the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, says the good news is that education is among the areas in best shape. But there is still work to be done when it comes to learning outcomes.

  • Evaluating Policy Options to Increase Primary Care in Washington State

    Nov 15, 2016

    Xiaoyu Nie (cohort '14), Simon Hollands (cohort '15) and fellow RAND researchers evaluated several policy options under consideration by the Washington State legislature to address a possible shortage of primary care physicians.

  • Brooks Says Donald Trump Filled the Dignity Deficit

    Nov 10, 2016

    "Tuesday’s election results stunned pollsters and pundits. But to observers who have been watching deeper trends across America, the outcome was hardly incomprehensible," writes alum Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) in the Wall Street Journal.

  • Students Advise Big Blue Bus as Part of Client-Oriented Policy Analysis Course

    Nov 7, 2016

    Julia Pollak (cohort '12), Andrew Cady and Jakub Hlavka (both cohort '14) helped to optimize local transit connectivity by developing a robust set of performance measures for first- and last-mile bus services to the seven new Expo Light Rail stations on L.A.'s Westside.

  • Romero Suggests a Novel Way to Fund Health Insurance: Revenue Bonds

    Nov 4, 2016

    Health reformers talk of 'bending the cost curve': cutting medical inflation, which has long been several times overall inflation. ... If you can’t bend the cost curve, bend the curve on the cost of funding. Financing techniques can fund health care without deficits, writes alum Philip Romero (cohort '83) in the Portland Business Journal.

  • Pardee RAND Partners with Eisenhower Fellows Program

    Oct 28, 2016

    In conjunction with Eisenhower Fellowships’ inaugural Africa Program, EF sent eight Fellows to Pardee RAND Graduate School in Santa Monica, California for three days of intensive skill-building, leadership training and transformative knowledge development, October 24-26, 2016.