Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Oregon's Options for Financing Health Care

    Jan 19, 2017

    Federal health care reform had just begun in 2013 when Oregon authorized a study to improve how the state pays for health care. A comparison of the projected impacts and feasibility of four options—developed by alum Jodi Liu (cohort '12), professors Chapin White and Christine Eibner, and several RAND colleagues—can help Oregon's stakeholders choose the option that best suits their needs.

  • Taking Stock of the U.S. Rebalance and the Contest for Influence in Asia

    Jan 19, 2017

    Since 2011, the U.S. has carried out measures designed to bolster its influence in Asia, a region that is projected to play a central role in driving global economic growth. Prof. Timothy Heath writes that, despite steady progress, with increased diplomatic outreach to China and its neighbors, doubts about the U.S. pivot to Asia have persisted.

  • No Company Should Be Able to Keep You from Checking Your Government's Math

    Jan 18, 2017

    Data and computer models are becoming more and more important for making policy decisions on everything from prison sentences to tax bills. Prof. Brian Jackson argues that citizens should be able to “check the math” on decisions that affect them.

  • Trump's Marijuana Options

    Jan 17, 2017

    The new administration will have at least six options for addressing marijuana — they are not mutually exclusive and each comes with tradeoffs, writes Prof. Beau Kilmer. Importantly, they are all compatible with a federal approach that encourages and supports discussions about marijuana prohibition and its alternatives.

  • The Wrong Terrorism Narrative

    Jan 15, 2017

    Solving the problem of homegrown terrorism in the U.S. requires understanding the true nature of the complex problem of violent extremism. Prof. Henry Willis says that, with such knowledge, authorities and communities will be better able to develop strategies to prevent the next tragic terrorist killing.

  • Faculty Leaders Program Applications Now Being Accepted

    Jan 12, 2017

    Want to up your game in policy analysis? Learn more about the Pardee RAND Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development program to augment your existing teaching and research. Applications are being accepted through March 15.

  • Improving MACRA's Chances of Success

    Jan 9, 2017

    Starting in 2019, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act will integrate and potentially simplify performance measurement by combining a number of measures and programs. Research on performance measurement provides a good deal of insight on how to avoid several pitfalls in MACRA's rollout, writes prof. Peter Hussey.

  • Trump Should Confront Kim Over ICBM Tests

    Jan 6, 2017

    Whether successful or not, an ICBM test by North Korea would be very much against U.S. interests and President-elect Trump should act to counter it as early as possible. A turn to the basics of deterrence would be the path most likely to succeed, writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75).

  • Improving HIV and Mental Health Care in Uganda

    Jan 5, 2017

    A small team of RAND researchers, including two Pardee RAND professors, has spent years working with local clinics in Uganda to help people not just survive HIV, but learn to live with it, and even thrive.

  • Can a Continuous Coverage Requirement Produce a Healthy Insurance Market?

    Jan 4, 2017

    A continuous coverage requirement is intended to discourage individuals from waiting until they become sick to purchase insurance. Student Erin Duffy (cohort '15) says such a requirement works well in theory to maintain a healthy marketplace, but there is little evidence on how well it might work in practice.

  • Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Service Members

    Jan 4, 2017

    Prescription drug misuse is of critical concern for the military because of its potential impact on the health and well-being of personnel, military readiness, and associated health care costs. Alumni Janice Blanchard (cohort '98) and Jennifer Walters (cohort '11) worked with RAND colleagues to offer ideas for addressing the problem.

  • RAND Celebrates Alum Rick Fallon's Career

    Jan 4, 2017

    Pardee RAND alum Rick Fallon (cohort '75) retired from RAND in January 2017 after two decades of service. As CFO and VP of Finance & Administration, Fallon worked on critical business decisions, performance measures, and initiatives that have increased the agility of RAND's operations.

  • Uncertainty Ahead: Defense Technology and Acquisition Trends in 2017

    Jan 3, 2017

    Prof. Cynthia Cook writes that the change in administration, coupled with the new management structure being imposed by Congress on the Department of Defense's acquisition enterprise, is creating a shifting and unpredictable landscape for 2017.

  • Walking Away from One-China Policy Imperils Taiwan

    Dec 22, 2016

    The U.S. One-China policy has helped keep the peace for decades. Abandoning it now could result in stiffer Chinese resolve. Such a strategy may even backfire by triggering an otherwise avoidable crisis, writes prof. Michael Chase.

  • Approaching Future Offsets

    Dec 21, 2016

    Grand strategy, acquisitions, and technological considerations may shape the debate about the future of the U.S. military for some time to come. Only where all three elements align are future offsets likely to succeed, writes alum Yuna Huh Wong (cohort '00).

  • Carrier Deal Does Not Carry the Day for American Workers

    Dec 21, 2016

    Despite the good intentions, pressuring companies like Carrier to keep jobs in the U.S. addresses only the smaller part of the problem, globalization. Professors Krishna Kumar and Lynn Karoly suggest a long-term solution would be to upgrade the education and training system so students graduate with skills for life-long learning.

  • Toward a Learning Behavioral Health Care System

    Dec 20, 2016

    New technologies for capturing and sharing data have begun to transform the way providers practice medicine in the United States. Expanding these technologies to behavioral health care could enhance the delivery of services and improve outcomes for millions of Americans, writes alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97).

  • Cracks in the Chinese Powerhouse

    Dec 19, 2016

    Like most countries that have experienced rapid development, China is struggling to transition from a highly successful but unsustainable economic model. Beijing faces the additional challenge of executing difficult reforms in the face of an inhospitable global economy, writes professor Timothy Heath.

  • Pardee RAND Celebrates Season with Festive Party

    Dec 19, 2016

    Students, alumni, faculty, and staff rang in the 2016 holiday season in true Pardee RAND style on December 8. Students Etienne Rosas (cohort '14) and Claire O'Hanlon (cohort 13), alum Eric Larson (cohort '89) and executive assistant Jennifer Prim provided live musical entertainment for the many attendees.

  • Insuring Younger Adults Through the ACA's Marketplaces: Options to Expand Enrollment

    Dec 16, 2016

    Whether or not the Affordable Care Act is repealed, having young adults participate in the individual health insurance market remains critical to achieving affordable premiums for everyone, writes Prof. Christine Eibner.

  • Remembering Our Founding Dean, Charles Wolf, Jr.

    Dec 16, 2016

    Charles Wolf, Jr. passed away on October 24, 2016. He was 92. Over his 60 years at RAND, Wolf was a teacher, mentor, and friend to countless students, alumni, staff, and professors. He has left behind a tremendous legacy that is greatly missed.

  • Support for Postsecondary Education in Prison

    Dec 15, 2016

    Correctional educational programs can reduce incarceration costs and recidivism. But it's critical that former inmates can connect with reentry services in the community to complete their education, writes professor Lois Davis.

  • The Future of Artificial Intelligence

    Dec 14, 2016

    In this Events @ RAND podcast, three Pardee RAND professors discuss the role AI is playing in society, including the incredible promise and pressing concerns.

  • Improving School Leadership Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

    Dec 13, 2016

    School leadership is acknowledged as a valid target of educational-improvement activities in the Every Student Succeeds Act, allowing funds to be spent on strengthening it. An updated analysis by students Aziza Arifkhanova, Andriy Bega, Emilio Chavez-Herrerias, Eugene Han and RAND colleagues provides education policymakers with guidance on the use of research-based school leadership programs.

  • Making American Education Great Will Require More Than Charter Schools

    Dec 13, 2016

    The nomination of Betsy DeVos for U.S. Secretary of Education has shone a spotlight on charter schools, writes professor Darleen Opfer. While charters could become an important part of a great education system, this burst of attention poses a risk that other issues will be ignored.