Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Another Nepal Earthquake Makes Disaster Relief Planning Even More Important

    May 13, 2015

    Leadership, coordination, communication, and involvement of local stakeholders are critical to an informed response to natural disasters, writes Prof. Melinda Moore. Improved disaster management in Nepal could help limit the suffering of impacted communities and help secure a more successful recovery in the long run.

  • NEJM Study Shows Gay Youth Bullied More than Straight Youth

    May 8, 2015

    A study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that young people who later identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual are bullied more than their peers as early as 5th grade. Alum Mark Schuster (cohort '91), Chief of General Pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, led the study and discusses his findings.

  • As Ebola Declines, Lessons Emerge

    May 7, 2015

    Lessons learned through the analysis of this most recent Ebola outbreak, as well as other disease outbreaks, can have far-reaching consequences, helping authorities to both improve the continuing, ongoing response and plan for the best possible response to future threats. In this commentary, RAND president Michael Rich highlights several toolkits developed by Pardee RAND students and faculty.

  • Peacetime Fuel 'Tankering' Could Save $25 Million Per Year

    May 4, 2015

    Fuel tankering is carrying excess fuel on an aircraft when flying from origins where fuel is less expensive than at the destination. Tankering fuel to a conflict zone like Afghanistan is almost always cost-effective, writes Prof. Christopher Mouton, but the story is more complex elsewhere due to how fuel is purchased and resold within the DoD itself.

  • Pardee RAND Awards Funding for Internships

    Apr 20, 2015

    It is always exciting to see our students put their knowledge to work outside of RAND and experience what it's like to work in organizations in their fields of interest. To that end, Pardee RAND is happy to announce funding for three external fellowships.

  • South Korea's Missile-Defense System Decision: Q&A with Bruce Bennett

    Apr 3, 2015

    Chinese pressure on South Korea not to allow deployment of a terminal high-altitude air defense (THAAD) defense missile system has become a major regional security issue. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) answers a Q&A on what might it mean if the U.S. deploys it anyway.

  • What's at Stake in Nigeria's Elections

    Mar 27, 2015

    Next to ethnic and religious predilections, security is by far the biggest issue for Nigerians in Saturday's election, writes Tobi Oluwatola (cohort '12). For more than 50 years, since Nigeria's independence from British rule, its military has played an important role in peacekeeping across the continent. Paradoxically, the country has struggled with an insurgency within its own borders.

  • Interactive Map Highlights Research Related to Global Human Progress

    Mar 25, 2015

    Through the Pardee Initiative, Pardee RAND students and RAND researchers conduct extensive work and write about issues of global human development around the world. An interactive map allows users to learn more about—and more easily access—that research.

  • Assessing the Feasibility of Analysing Foreign Funding of Islamic Institutions

    Mar 13, 2015

    The Netherlands Research and Documentation Centre (WODC) asked RAND Europe to assess the feasibility of conducting a full analysis of the size, scope and potential influence of foreign funding to Islamic institutions in the Netherlands. Pardee RAND student Gursel Aliyev (cohort '13) helped work on this project as part of his on-the-job training with RAND.

  • UK and Europe Are Behind the Times for Single Mothers and Their Children

    Mar 11, 2015

    Single parents head 10.4 percent of households with children across Europe — 20.4 percent in the UK — and the socioeconomic gap between single- and two-parent households continues to grow. Accessible and flexible work policies are needed to improve employment conditions for single parents, especially mothers.

  • Mental Health Care in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and Opportunities

    Mar 10, 2015

    Depression is the leading cause of disability throughout the world and is especially prevalent among low-income African countries, where 75 percent of the people who suffer from mental illness do not have easy access to the mental health care they need, writes Mahlet A. Woldetsadik (cohort '13).

  • Progress After Ferguson? Good Ideas Need Good Implementation

    Mar 9, 2015

    President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing has done a great service by providing dozens of sound recommendations—good ideas that could help avoid another Ferguson. Now we need good implementation to go along with them.

  • For Ukraine, the Battle to Bolster a Crashing Economy Is as Dire as Combat in the East

    Mar 9, 2015

    Ukraine's struggle to keep afloat economically has been daunting, as its parliament has fallen into disarray and failed to enact major economic reforms. Ukrainian lawmakers could help by dealing better with the national budget but their recent deliberations inspired little public confidence, writes Olena Bogdan (cohort '12).

  • Europe Must Spend More on Arms to Deter Putin

    Mar 3, 2015

    Demonstrations in Greece and elsewhere suggest that the European public may have little sympathy for governments not devoting most efforts to domestic discontent and foreign indebtedness, writes Professor Steven Popper. But the longtime downward trends in European defense spending matter now that Russia has chosen to flex its military might, diminished though it may be.

  • Is Geographic Clustering Driving Political Polarization?

    Mar 3, 2015

    The ideological gap separating the Republican and Democratic parties in Congress has grown dramatically wider in recent decades, write Alum Jesse Sussell (cohort '10) and former RAND president James Thomson. An analysis of the presidential vote in congressional districts over the last 60 years finds that the degree to which most districts are different from the “average” district has grown, supporting the theory that polarization stems from geographic clustering.

  • Future of Coastal Flooding

    Feb 25, 2015

    President Obama's executive order that directs federal agencies to plan and build for higher flood levels as they construct new projects in flood-prone regions will affect hundreds of billions of dollars of future public works projects. In an ideal world, write Pardee RAND faculty Debra Knopman and Rob Lempert, and alum Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04), planners would estimate the benefits and costs for each project, taking into account everything from the details of the local landscape to the potential for adaptive responses over time.

  • Last Week Tonight's Jeff the Diseased Lung Is No Joke

    Feb 20, 2015

    John Oliver's “Jeff the Diseased Lung,” a cross between a warning label on cigarette packs in Australia and the Marlboro Man, has gone viral, writes alumnus/professor Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85). Meanwhile, research shows cigarettes are responsible for even more premature deaths than previously thought.

  • Singer Describes Research for Annals of Internal Medicine

    Feb 9, 2015

    Despite national efforts to improve end-of-life care, proxy reports of pain and other alarming symptoms in the last year of life increased from 1998 to 2010. Adam Singer (cohort '11) describes his research, which was published in the February issue, in a video as well as author Q&A.

  • Premium Tax Credits and the Affordable Care Act: The Potential Ramifications of King v. Burwell

    Feb 3, 2015

    In this February 2015 Congressional Briefing, Christine Eibner discusses the role of premium tax credits in ensuring stability in the individual health insurance marketplace and the ramifications of King v. Burwell on the Affordable Care Act.

  • U.S.-India Relations: Will the Obama-Modi Personal Chemistry Suffice?

    Feb 3, 2015

    U.S. President Barack Obama's visit with Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India has generated generally positive reactions from analysts, writes Gulrez Shah Azhar (cohort '14). These judgments will be reinforced if the leaders' current chemistry changes Indo-U.S. policy for the better.

  • Growth Versus Equality: Striking the Right Balance

    Jan 30, 2015

    There's a difficult trade-off between income equality and the growth that comes from successful innovation. But one doesn't have to overwhelm the other.

  • Recommendations for ESEA Reauthorization That Support Innovation

    Jan 27, 2015

    As lawmakers consider the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, it is critical that in meeting their objectives they do not create unnecessary obstacles to the productive innovations being explored at schools, such as personalized learning.

  • Insights About Marijuana Legalization in the United States

    Jan 21, 2015

    In this January 2015 Congressional Briefing, Professor Beau Kilmer and RAND researcher Jonathan Caulkins present an overview of their new report, Considering Marijuana Legalization: Insights for Vermont and Other Jurisdictions.

  • Cost of College in the United States

    Jan 16, 2015

    For middle- to lower-income families in the U.S., in particular, the costs associated with attending a four-year university are becoming nearly impossible to bear, notes Marlon Graf (cohort '12). More and more students are ending up with significant debt after graduating from college, putting financial pressure on them at the outset of their professional careers.

  • Domestic Violence as a Way of Life: The Reality for Papua New Guinea's Women

    Dec 31, 2014

    Violence against women is a persistent problem around the world. That's particularly true of Papua New Guinea, writes Mahal Woldetsadik (cohort '13), where abuse of women by domestic partners, gang members, and members of law enforcement is widespread, drawing comparisons to conditions in conflict zones.