Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Brooks Says Donald Trump Filled the Dignity Deficit

    Nov 9, 2016

    "Tuesday’s election results stunned pollsters and pundits. But to observers who have been watching deeper trends across America, the outcome was hardly incomprehensible," writes alum Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) in the Wall Street Journal.

  • Students Advise Big Blue Bus as Part of Client-Oriented Policy Analysis Course

    Nov 6, 2016

    Julia Pollak (cohort '12), Andrew Cady and Jakub Hlavka (both cohort '14) helped to optimize local transit connectivity by developing a robust set of performance measures for first- and last-mile bus services to the seven new Expo Light Rail stations on L.A.'s Westside.

  • Romero Suggests a Novel Way to Fund Health Insurance: Revenue Bonds

    Nov 3, 2016

    Health reformers talk of 'bending the cost curve': cutting medical inflation, which has long been several times overall inflation. ... If you can’t bend the cost curve, bend the curve on the cost of funding. Financing techniques can fund health care without deficits, writes alum Philip Romero (cohort '83) in the Portland Business Journal.

  • Pardee RAND Partners with Eisenhower Fellows Program

    Oct 27, 2016

    In conjunction with Eisenhower Fellowships’ inaugural Africa Program, EF sent eight Fellows to Pardee RAND Graduate School in Santa Monica, California for three days of intensive skill-building, leadership training and transformative knowledge development, October 24-26, 2016.

  • CVD Prevention Important in Breast Cancer Patients

    Oct 13, 2016

    Mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major competing risk in women with early-stage breast cancer, according to findings by alum Geoffrey Anderson (cohort '83) and University of Toronto colleagues, published in JAMA Cardiology.

  • The Hot Spots of the World

    Oct 13, 2016

    Scarcity of food, energy, and water endangers the lives of millions. So Pardee RAND professors and students created a tool with the potential to help make aid initiatives more effective.

  • Andreyeva Examines Health Impact of Government Food Programs

    Oct 12, 2016

    Participants in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) assistance program have increased their purchase of healthy food items since the program's revision in 2009, according to research by alum Tatiana Andreyeva (cohort '01) published in the journal Preventive Medicine.

  • Q&A with Thorpe on NCDs in India

    Oct 10, 2016

    Alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80), chairman of the Partnership to Fight Chronic Diseases, discussed the economic and overall burden of non-communicable diseases and low expenditure on public health in India.

  • How to Rethink Data Privacy

    Oct 5, 2016

    Society benefits from the exchange of large-scale data in many ways. Anonymization is the usual mechanism for addressing the privacy of data subjects. Unfortunately, according to professors Osonde Osoba and John Davis, anonymization is broken.

  • How to Be Safer in the Arctic

    Oct 3, 2016

    The Arctic is more accessible than it once was, but it's still a formidable place to travel. An emergency involving a cruise ship or a downed plane could stress the search-and-rescue system. But modest investments and planning measures can make a big difference, write alum Timothy Smith (cohort '13) and prof. Abbie Tingstad.

  • Estimating the Impacts of the Trump and Clinton Health Plans

    Sep 23, 2016

    An analysis by Prof. Christine Eibner of the proposed health care plans of the two major parties' presidential candidates estimated the likely effects of each policy relative to the ACA in 2018 on the number of people covered, consumer out-of-pocket spending, and the federal deficit.

  • How to Prevent Drones Colliding in Crowded Skies

    Sep 14, 2016

    The federal government should work with private firms to develop drone traffic management systems and test drone designs, write professors Kenneth Kuhn, William Welser, and Jia Xu. This could help stimulate the development of drone aviation. It could also help modernize the air traffic control system.

  • Central Bank Perversity: The Downside to Aggressive Monetary Policy

    Sep 13, 2016

    Aggressive monetary policy has negative effects on retirees, on income inequality, and on market stability—both domestically and globally—writes Prof. Charles Wolf.

  • Your Questions About Marijuana Legalization, Answered

    Sep 13, 2016

    At least five states will vote on legal recreational marijuana this November. Drug policy expert and Pardee RAND professor Beau Kilmer hosted an “Ask Me Anything” session on Reddit to shed light on this and other issues.

  • The Precarious State of Syrian Refugee Women, Children in Lebanon

    Sep 13, 2016

    While the gendered impact of political conflict on women and children has been well-documented in other conflicts, much less is known about the effect the Syrian civil war is having on women and children displaced by the conflict, writes Mahlet Atakilt Woldetsadik (cohort '13).

  • Zanini Quantifies Cost of Excess Management

    Sep 5, 2016

    According to research by alum Michele Zanini (cohort '96) published in the Harvard Business Review, "bureaucracy creates a significant drag on productivity and organizational resilience and innovation" and costs the United States $3 trillion per year.

  • How 'Star Trek' Inspired a Boy to Become a Scientist

    Aug 26, 2016

    Prof. William Marcellino discusses how “Star Trek” convinced him at an early age that science and the advancement of human knowledge could make the world a better place.

  • The U.S.-China Cyber Agreement: A Good First Step

    Aug 1, 2016

    China's apparent compliance with the cyber agreement might represent little more than a temporary shift in tactics. Prof. Scott Harold says the U.S. should make clear that indictments may once again be sought if Chinese hackers resume cyber espionage against U.S. firms.

  • How to Counter Putin's Subversive War on the West

    Aug 1, 2016

    Russian cybercrime, Olympics doping, and other active measures have one thing in common: Moscow admits no wrongdoing. These scandals exacerbate the frigid relations between Moscow and the West. Diplomacy sometimes works slowly, but it helps, writes prof. Martin Libicki.

  • The High Cost of Free College

    Aug 1, 2016

    Subsidies may make institutions inclined to raise tuition since the government would foot the bill. One way to address this issue, writes prof. Trey Miller, is to develop and implement policies that encourage greater productivity from higher education institutions.

  • Faculty Leaders Program Trains Twelve More Policy Research Mentors

    Jul 28, 2016

    In the last four years, nearly 50 faculty members from 26 institutions across the United States have participated in the Pardee RAND Faculty Leaders Program, a professional development opportunity aimed at faculty serving highly diverse student bodies.

  • Fatal Crash Shouldn't Kill Self-Driving Cars

    Jul 16, 2016

    The first known fatality in an autonomous vehicle occurred on May 7 and raises important questions. It does not, however, mean that self-driving cars are less safe than human drivers or that development of the technology should be stopped, writes Prof. Nidhi Kalra.

  • Should Some Californians Lose Their 'License to Drink'?

    Jul 6, 2016

    In California, many efforts to reduce repeat drunken driving focus on the driving. Prof. Beau Kilmer asks, What if the state targeted the “drunk” aspect instead?

  • Revisiting Restrictions on Blood Donations from Gay and Bisexual Men

    Jul 5, 2016

    The FDA does not accept blood from male donors who have had sex with a man in the previous 12 months. This has led to an ongoing debate about whether this restriction is supported by scientific evidence or, as some have argued, related to lingering stigma and discrimination related to HIV/AIDS, writes Prof. Sarah MacCarthy.

  • Grasping the Brexit Moment for Free Trade

    Jul 1, 2016

    The United Kingdom's surprising vote to exit the EU turned another tricky day into a possible social crisis. But where there is crisis, there is also opportunity, and the vote presents an opening for another step forward of global trade and investment liberalization, writes Prof. Howard Shatz.