Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • The U.S.-China Summit Is More Significant for Xi Jinping Than Obama

    Sep 24, 2015

    The Xi-Obama summit will provide the opportunity to discuss contentious issues like cybersecurity and the South China Sea, as well as other issues, such as climate change and economic cooperation. For Xi, writes Prof. Howard Shatz, the visit underscores the tremendous importance of messaging to a Chinese audience the narrative of a continued stable and robust partnership with the country that matters most to China politically and economically.

  • Pardee RAND Graduate School Names Paul C. Light First Distinguished Visiting Professor

    Sep 23, 2015

    Paul C. Light is an international leader in the field of public policy and public service. As the first-ever Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, he will teach a class, lead a seminar, and participate in events.

  • Xi's Visit Exposes Mismatch in U.S and Chinese Expectations

    Sep 23, 2015

    Chinese President Xi Jinping's U.S. visit this week appears to face serious headwinds. Contrasting U.S. and Chinese priorities will likely lead to disappointment on both sides, writes Prof. Timothy Heath

  • The Changing Face of America's Front Lines: Women in Special Operations and Combat Roles

    Sep 21, 2015

    In this Events @ RAND podcast, author Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, Pardee RAND dean Susan Marquis, and RAND expert John Winkler discuss how a pioneering team of women who served alongside Rangers and SEALS in Afghanistan in 2011 helped pave the way for women's roles in the military, as well as the issues that remain.

  • Lessons from the Past for the Future of the KC-46A

    Sep 16, 2015

    Analysis suggests that fixed-price contracts have not successfully reduced costs to the DoD associated with developing complex weapon systems. This has implications for the Air Force, given the importance of the ongoing KC-46A program, writes Prof. Mark Lorell and colleagues.

  • Charging Older Adults Higher Premiums Could Cost Taxpayers

    Sep 15, 2015

    Under the Affordable Care Act, older adults cannot be charged more than three times as much as 21- to 24-year-olds for the same plan. Changing this rule to 5-to-1 may not be a cost-effective way to encourage enrollment among the young and healthy, writes Prof. Christine Eibner.

  • Xi in Command: Downsizing and Reorganizing the People's Liberation Army

    Sep 14, 2015

    Chinese President Xi Jinping recently announced that China would reduce the number of troops in its army by 300,000. But that is only a first step in a more ambitious reform and reorganization plan, writes Prof. Michael Chase.

  • Lessons from a Hacker: Cyber Concepts for Policymakers

    Sep 14, 2015

    In this September 14th congressional briefing, Prof. Lillian Ablon discusses the basics of cyber and information security and provides insights into some of the complexities of cybersecurity policymaking. Topics include why software vulnerabilities are significant, the components of cyber risk beyond the threat, motivations of various cyber threats actors, and what they exploit.

  • China's Military Modernization: Eric Heginbotham and Michael Chase in Conversation

    Sep 14, 2015

    Professors Heginbotham and Chase discuss their recent assessments of Chinese military modernization and its implications for U.S. interests in Asia.

  • Creating a Smart Market for California Water

    Sep 13, 2015

    A smart market approach could reduce the transaction costs of trading water in California, allow the price of water to better match its value, and bring that value to the state, write Professors John Raffensperger and Craig Bond.

  • ISIS Plus Chemical Weapons Does Not Equal Apocalypse

    Sep 11, 2015

    The renewed use of chemical weapons on the battlefields of Iraq and Syria is a dangerous regional phenomenon, not an imminent global threat, writes Professor Scott Savitz.

  • What Hurricane Katrina Taught Us About Community Resilience

    Sep 8, 2015

    Hurricane Katrina left a path of destruction, death, and suffering in its wake. Its recovery, halting and incomplete as it has been, has taught us valuable lessons about resiliency, writes Prof. Anita Chandra.

  • One in Five Hourly Employees Working Overtime Not Properly Compensated

    Sep 4, 2015

    Most laws as old as the Fair Labor Standards Act regularly need tuning up. But its overtime provisions are complicated because some workers are exempt from being covered, writes Prof. Susann Rohwedder. A survey of more than 1,500 employed adults finds that employers are violating the rules.

  • Summer 2015 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Sep 4, 2015

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about Charles Wolf's 60 years at RAND, new courses for the new school year, a Pardee Initiative effort to bring traditional grains back to the dinner table, and more.

  • China's Military Parade Highlights Its New Strategic Capabilities

    Sep 3, 2015

    China's elaborate military parade to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II showcased some of the People's Liberation Army's newest high-tech weapons, writes Prof. Michael Chase.

  • Is It Time to Appoint a Data Security Czar?

    Sep 3, 2015

    Cybersecurity needs to become more of a priority for the government and private corporations. Whatever the solution, writes Prof. Lillian Ablon, public and private officials need to do a better job of weighing the risk-benefit calculation of storing data on Internet-accessible computers and justifying data-handling protocols.

  • How School Choice Could Disadvantage Low-Income Students

    Sep 1, 2015

    The flexibility to allow Title I-A funds to follow students across schools has a certain appeal. But it could have negative consequences for some of the poorest students, writes Prof. Brian Stecher.

  • Why Kim Jong Un Fears South Korean Propaganda

    Aug 28, 2015

    While the latest confrontation between North and South Korea appears to be ending peacefully, it provides insight into future North Korean provocations. Words as weapons can work when they are aimed at North Korea's internal politics and backed up by a strong South Korean response supported by the U.S., writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '76).

  • Two Students Receive Inaugural Fellowships from Leonard Schaeffer RAND-USC Initiative

    Aug 24, 2015

    The Leonard Schaeffer RAND-USC Initiative in Health Policy and Economics is pleased to announce that two PhD candidates in policy analysis, Dan Han and Ujwal Kharel, are the recipients of the inaugural fellowships for Pardee RAND Graduate School students.

  • Control Disease in a New York Minute

    Aug 20, 2015

    Legionella bacteria are ubiquitous in many warm-water environments, but outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease like the recent one in the South Bronx don't have to be. Effective public health policies can help inhibit Legionella growth, minimize the occurrence and impact of outbreaks, and save lives, writes Prof. Melinda Moore.

  • Bringing Traditional Grains Back to the African Dinner Table

    Aug 18, 2015

    Although they are more nutritious and well-adapted to Africa's agro-ecological conditions, traditional grains have been losing market share to new grains—especially maize, rice and wheat. A joint initiative of Pardee RAND and the African Centre for Economic Transformation is exploring ways to bring sorghum and millet back to the dinner table.

  • Loose Clicks Sink Ships: When Social Media Meets Military Intelligence

    Aug 14, 2015

    Social media updates can reveal military intelligence. But stopping a soldier from posting a geotagged tweet or Instagram photo presents challenges, writes Prof. Doug Yeung.

  • The Ramifications of Repealing the Individual Mandate

    Aug 13, 2015

    As part of its goal of near-universal coverage, the Affordable Care Act requires most Americans to obtain insurance or pay a penalty. Repealing that requirement would significantly reduce health insurance enrollment and cause individual market premiums to rise.

  • China's Airfield Construction at Fiery Cross Reef in Context: Catch-Up or Coercion?

    Aug 11, 2015

    Even if China really sees itself as undertaking legitimate activities to protect its rightful interests, it is not surprising that its rival claimants, as well as the United States and other countries in the region, see Beijing's island building activities as efforts to improve China's abilities to bully its neighbors.

  • Climate Targets: Values and Uncertainty

    Aug 11, 2015

    Policymakers know that the risks associated with climate change mean they need to cut greenhouse-gas emissions. But uncertainty surrounding the likelihood of different scenarios makes choosing specific policies difficult.