Pardee RAND News & Events

Pardee RAND Graduate School students, alumni, and faculty are often in the news, writing blogs, publishing research, speaking at events, and more. Other pages (student blog posts, alumni news, faculty blog posts, featured research) provide filtered views of Pardee RAND news; here we present a compilation of all the news that's fit to share.

  • Hackerazzi: How Naked Celebrities Might Make the Cloud Safer

    Sep 8, 2014

    Despite data breach after data breach that lays bare the personal information of millions of people, leading to only incremental changes by the hacked company, it seems it only takes a handful of celebrity nude selfies to bring issues like cloud security and multi-factor authentication to the fore causing immediate changes, writes Professor Lillian Ablon.

  • Technology Summit for Victim Service Providers

    Sep 8, 2014

    Professor Nelson Lim and RAND colleagues brought together two communities — victim service providers and technology innovators — for a national one-day summit at the Computer History Museum in Silicon Valley to discuss leveraging technology so victims of crime can quickly and effectively obtain the help they need.

  • If You Want Ex-Cons to Be 'Productive Members of Society,' Ban the Box

    Sep 5, 2014

    When an inmate is released, you often hear Americans say that he's “paid his debt” and can now become “a productive member of society.” But, Professor Lois Davis writes, the reality is ex-cons pay for their crimes long after sentences end. On the outside, the stigma of incarceration makes it extremely difficult to land a job.

  • A Dispatch from the Ukrainian Front

    Sep 5, 2014

    If Putin sought advice about what NATO is thinking, his Russian Western Front Military commander might say that given its current political indecisiveness and lack of military readiness, NATO lacks the capability to launch a credible intervention, but they should watch for changes in the alliance posture, writes Professor Terrence Kelly.

  • A Broad Approach to Countering the Islamic State

    Sep 2, 2014

    Recent analysis about how to defeat the Islamic State tends to be based on no more than intuition, a general sense of history, or a small number of cases of questionable comparability. A study of 71 historical cases of counterinsurgencies by Professor Chris Paul and colleagues should help provide empirical evidence to this important debate.

  • The Winding Path to Effective Bundled Payment

    Aug 29, 2014

    It's not unusual for a demonstration to fall short of its original objectives, writes Professor Peter Hussey. Learning from such cases is part of the innovation process. This is especially worthwhile for bundled payment, which has many potential benefits for patients, providers, and payers.

  • Women's Menstrual Hygiene in India: The Health and Environmental Implications

    Aug 22, 2014

    According to India's 2011 census, 89 percent of the nation's rural population lives in households that lack toilets. This absence of proper sanitation presents public health challenges and affects Indian women disproportionately, writes Pardee RAND student Mahal Woldetsadik (cohort '13) for the Pardee Initiative blog.

  • Make Russia an Offer on Ukraine It Can't Refuse

    Aug 20, 2014

    An international initiative that does not appear to emanate from NATO or the EU could help bring Russia to the table, in part by accepting that Moscow, too, has a role. Professor Keith Crane writes, an international peacekeeping force could open the way for a negotiated end to the conflict.

  • Pardee RAND Promotes Diversity in Public Policy Through Summer Faculty Workshop

    Aug 20, 2014

    The Pardee RAND summer faculty workshop aims to help scholars who teach at historically black colleges and universities strengthen their approach to research and bring new analytic thinking, tools, and practices back to their students, inspiring them to pursue graduate education and careers in public policy.

  • Always Hungry? Here's the Real Reason Why

    Aug 15, 2014

    The problem of obesity cannot be attributed to a single dietary or physiological factor, like too much sugar, too much fat, or even factors like viruses, bacteria, and endocrine disrupters. Professor Deborah Cohen says the real problem is that Americans now live in a food swamp and there is just too much food easily available.

  • What's Going on in Iraq?

    Aug 14, 2014

    While the United States could embark on a much wider war in Iraq, there's little reason to think it will rush to do so or that using airpower to help defend the Kurds will make such an escalation inevitable, writes Professor Karl Mueller.

  • The Silicon Valley Tech Industry Can Help Crime Victims

    Aug 11, 2014

    A broader approach is needed to better address the needs of millions of American victims of crimes like sexual assault, family violence, financial exploitation, gun violence, identity theft, burglary and stalking. And that's where Silicon Valley's tech community can step up, writes Professor Nelson Lim.

  • Leveraging Behavioral Insights to Improve Financial Health: Proceedings of the 2014 BeFi Conference

    Jul 29, 2014

    At the 2014 RAND Behavioral Finance (BeFi) Forum, Professor Jeremy Burke discussed prize-linked debt reduction. The proceedings features videos of each of the presentations, followed by discussion by leading researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.

  • Enhancing the Climate Resilience of Africa's Infrastructure

    Jul 25, 2014

    Students Evan Bloom, Min Mao, and Tobi Oluwatola are helping to develop location-specific case studies on the Orange and Volta River Basins in Africa to help improve understanding of how climate change may affect water and energy infrastructure investments across the entire continent.

  • Should You Get Screened for Heart Disease?

    Jul 24, 2014

    Many think of cardiovascular disease (CVD) primarily as a male problem, writes Professor Chloe Bird. But one in three adult women has some form of CVD, which has killed more American women than men every year since 1984. Cardiovascular risk assessments can help women understand their current risk and health behaviors.

  • Defeating the Islamic State: Crafting a Regional Approach

    Jul 22, 2014

    While ISIL may achieve temporary tactical gains from declaring the caliphate, it made the strategic error of declaring all other Sunni political actors illegitimate, writes Professor Terrence Kelly. This may provide an opening to build a coalition that can create and implement a regional strategy to attack ISIL.

  • "I'm Too Busy for Exercise...I Just Don't Have the Time."

    Jul 17, 2014

    As hard as it can be to make time for exercise, failing to do so isn't a time-saver, writes Professor Chloe Bird. It might seem so for a day or two, but you will feel the result of not exercising in the reductions in your energy, ability to focus and cope, and in your quality of sleep.

  • Media Conference Call on Iran's Nuclear Program — U.S. Policy Choices and the Challenges Ahead

    Jul 14, 2014

    RAND international security experts Lynn E. Davis, a Pardee RAND professor, and Alireza Nader hosted a media conference call to discuss the July 20 deadline for the P5+1 (United States, Russia, China, United Kingdom, France, Germany) to reach a deal with Iran on its nuclear program, and the policy choices confronting the United States should an agreement be reached.

  • With Child Migrants Set to Become Students, Educators Must Prepare

    Jul 14, 2014

    Between 70,000 and 90,000 unaccompanied children are expected to cross the U.S.-Mexico border by year's end, writes Professor Robert Bozick. Lost in an intensifying debate over U.S. immigration policy is the possibility that this wave will spill from shelters to schools. To best respond to this reality, policymakers and educators should consider what research says about educating migrant children.

  • Taking a Sober Look at Legalizing Marijuana

    Jul 13, 2014

    California and a handful of other states will probably vote on legal pot in 2016. Whether it passes will depend on the quality of the proposal, how much money is involved in the campaigns, and how things play out in Colorado, Washington, and other places that have legalized production and sales, writes Professor Beau Kilmer.

  • Could Alternatives Ease the Misery of South Africa's Housing Crisis?

    Jul 10, 2014

    The government's plan to replace cardboard shacks with cement houses may not be the only route to easing South Africa's housing woes, writes Pardee RAND student Julia Polak (cohort '12). Increasingly, academic researchers, non-governmental organizations, and private companies are demonstrating pragmatic, low-cost, alternatives.

  • Why Japan's Military Shift Is Necessary for South Korea

    Jul 7, 2014

    With its collective self-defense policy, Japan assumes its responsibilities to support the defense of South Korea and regional security in general, an appropriate action given the economic and other interdependencies of the regional countries, writes Pardee RAND alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75).

  • What if Distracted Driving Was Safe?

    Jul 1, 2014

    According to consumer research, the ability to consume media, write an email, or even sleep during transport is a key selling point for self-driving cars, which could be available in the near future. Autonomous vehicle technology could also produce a wide range of public benefits, writes Professor James Anderson.

  • A Long-Term Strategy for a Democratic Iraq

    Jun 30, 2014

    Unfortunately, no strategic option for a unified, democratic Iraq has a good chance of success. But any well-considered option that doesn't involve ineffective killing or risking U.S. lives is preferable to simply allowing Iraq to disintegrate and feed broader regional instability, writes Professor Ben Connable.

  • New Coal Plant Rules Need Sustained Support to Succeed

    Jun 30, 2014

    Stopping climate change will require the U.S. and the rest of the world to virtually eliminate emissions over the course of the 21st century, write Professors Rob Lempert and Steven Popper. Getting anywhere close to zero emissions demands sustained political and public support, driven by an energy production sector given enough incentives.