Alumni: Life After Pardee RAND

PRGS alumni at 2016 Commencement

Photo by Monica Hertzman/RAND

New grads and alumni gather to celebrate Commencement Weekend 2016. View larger image.

Since its inception in 1970, the Pardee RAND Graduate School has graduated more than 300 PhDs. Our alumni have gone on to a wide range of jobs in government, business, non-profit institutions, and academia.

Pardee RAND organizes alumni activities and encourages alumni to let us know of their achievements and whereabouts. This page provides a brief glimpse at some recent events and news.

  • Using High-Performance Computing to Support Water Resource Planning

    Aug 25, 2016

    Alum David Groves (cohort '01) and Prof. Rob Lempert, along with researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, tested five different water management portfolios such as conservation, groundwater and seawater desalination, and water reuse, against thousands of scenarios reflecting uncertainty about future climate change and development patterns.

  • How Effective Are Military Academy Admission Standards?

    Jul 22, 2016

    Rigorous analyses by Susan Burkhauser and Mustafa Oguz (both cohort '09) of the selection processes for the U.S. Air Force Academy and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point show that the academies' processes predict students' future success as officers.

  • Afghan Government Support for Local Police Program Is Shaky

    Jul 21, 2016

    Established by U.S. and NATO special operations forces, the Afghan Local Police program was designed to become part of the Afghan Ministry of Interior Affairs (MOI). Research by Brian Gordon (cohort '12) indicates the MOI has made progress in logistics, personnel management, and training activities, but faces serious gaps in its ability to sustain the program.

  • U.S. Department of Defense Experiences with Substituting Government Employees for Military Personnel

    Jul 14, 2016

    There is considerable opportunity to identify positions suitable for military-to-civilian conversion, but there are numerous impediments to authorizing and executing military-to-civilian conversions, according to research by (then-students) Julia Pollak and Brian Gordon (both cohort '12), and professors Jennifer Lewis and Ed Keating.

  • Current and Future Exposure of Infrastructure in the United States to Natural Hazards

    Jul 12, 2016

    Infrastructure in some areas of the country currently faces disproportionate exposure to natural hazards, and this exposure is likely to increase in the future as a result of climate change, according to research by professor Henry Willis, alumni Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) and Edmundo Molina-Perez (cohort '11), and students Lauren Kendrick and Katie Loa (both cohort '12).