Alumni: Life After Pardee RAND

PRGS Alumni at 2014 Commencement

Photo by Yael Silk

Alumni gather to celebrate Commencement Weekend 2014

Since its inception in 1970, the Pardee RAND Graduate School has graduated more than 300 PhDs. Our alumni have gone on to a wide range of jobs in government, business, non-profit institutions, and academia.

Pardee RAND organizes alumni activities and encourages alumni to let us know of their achievements and whereabouts. This page provides a brief glimpse at some recent events and news.

  • Online Training Can Teach Psychotherapists Evidence-Based Treatments

    May 5, 2015

    Psychotherapy treatments can lag years behind what research has shown to be effective because there simply are not enough clinicians trained in new methods. But Pardee RAND alum Brad Stein (cohort '97) and colleagues find that e-learning can be as successful as in-person instruction for teaching psychotherapists how to use newer evidence-based treatments.

  • Have Beyond Yellow Ribbon Programs Met Their Goals?

    May 4, 2015

    Beyond Yellow Ribbon funding supports programs intended to provide critical outreach services to personnel returning from deployments and ease their transition into civilian life. An assessment by Mollie Rudnick (cohort '11), alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), and professor Laura Werber, looking at 13 such programs, can help stakeholders and congressional policymakers as they consider future BYR allocations.

  • South Korea's Missile-Defense System Decision: Q&A with Bruce Bennett

    Apr 3, 2015

    Chinese pressure on South Korea not to allow deployment of a terminal high-altitude air defense (THAAD) defense missile system has become a major regional security issue. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) answers a Q&A on what might it mean if the U.S. deploys it anyway.

  • Substantial Productivity Growth in U.S. Hospitals from 2002 to 2011

    Mar 10, 2015

    In a study of U.S. hospitals treating Medicare patients with heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia, findings by Pardee RAND alum Neeraj Sood (cohort '99) and RAND colleagues suggest that productivity in U.S. health care could be higher than previous studies had indicated.

  • Is Geographic Clustering Driving Political Polarization?

    Mar 3, 2015

    The ideological gap separating the Republican and Democratic parties in Congress has grown dramatically wider in recent decades, write Alum Jesse Sussell (cohort '10) and former RAND president James Thomson. An analysis of the presidential vote in congressional districts over the last 60 years finds that the degree to which most districts are different from the “average” district has grown, supporting the theory that polarization stems from geographic clustering.