Pardee RAND Alumni News

  • Pardee RAND to Hold Biennial Commencement Weekend

    Jun 18, 2016

    Pardee RAND Graduate School is pleased to announce its biennial Commencement Weekend will be held Friday, June 17 and Saturday, June 18, 2016. All alumni are encouraged to attend. More information will be available soon.

  • Peer Nutrition Counseling Reduces Food Insecurity Among HIV+ Hondurans

    Nov 24, 2015

    A peer-delivered nutritional counseling intervention for Hondurans living with HIV was associated with improvements in dietary quality and reduced food insecurity among a population of diverse nutritional statuses, according to research by alum Kartika Palar (cohort '06), student Melissa Felician (cohort '13), and professors Kathryn Derose and Bing Han. The authors suggest that future research should examine if such an intervention can improve adherence among people on ART.

  • Neighborhood Food Environment Minimally Affects Obesity in L.A.

    Nov 19, 2015

    In Los Angeles, the number of fast-food restaurants in a 3.0-mile radius is positively associated with fast-food consumption, and the number of convenience stores in a walkable, 0.25-mile radius distance is negatively associated with obesity, according to research by alum Ricardo Basurto-Davila (cohort '03), student Nelly Mejia-Gonzalez (cohort '11), and professor Roland Sturm.

  • Gun Violence: Where Is the Research That Might Save Lives?

    Nov 5, 2015

    Gun violence is an important public health problem that accounts for more than 33,000 deaths each year in the United States but in 1996, Congress stripped the CDC of funding for any research that could be associated with gun control advocacy. The lack of CDC funding has deterred researchers, writes Prof. (and alum) Jeffrey Wasserman (cohort '85).

  • California's Drought and Water Policy

    Sep 30, 2015

    California has implemented numerous policy changes to cope with a record-breaking, four-year drought. In this Events @ RAND podcast, a panel of experts—including Professor (and alum) David Groves (cohort '01)—discuss what government agencies can do to better manage water resources, what methods are most effective at encouraging citizens to use water wisely, and how leaders can better plan for future climate crises.

  • Exploring New Approaches to Higher Education: The Expansion of Competency-Based Programs

    Sep 29, 2015

    Policymakers and educators must determine if the risks of maintaining the status quo outweigh the potential benefits of competency-based programs, especially for those students who are ill-served by the traditional higher education model, write Alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05) and Prof. Trey Miller.

  • Managing Water Quality in the Face of Uncertainty

    Sep 9, 2015

    In a pilot study for the Environmental Protection Agency's National Water Program, Edmundo Molina-Perez (cohort '11), Abdul Ahad Tariq (cohort '10), and alum Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04) determined that the EPA and its partners can better manage future uncertainty by employing iterative risk management processes and adopting watershed implementation plans that are robust and flexible.

  • Summer 2015 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Sep 4, 2015

    Pardee RAND's alumni newsletter features articles about Charles Wolf's 60 years at RAND, new courses for the new school year, a Pardee Initiative effort to bring traditional grains back to the dinner table, and more.

  • Analyzing Unmet Health Care Needs in Teens and Affects on Adult Outcomes

    Sep 4, 2015

    Reported unmet health care need in adolescence is common and is an independent predictor of poor adult health, according to a an article coauthored by alum Mark Schuster (cohort '91). Strategies to reduce unmet adolescent need should address health engagement and care quality, as well as cost barriers to accessing services.

  • Why Kim Jong Un Fears South Korean Propaganda

    Aug 28, 2015

    While the latest confrontation between North and South Korea appears to be ending peacefully, it provides insight into future North Korean provocations. Words as weapons can work when they are aimed at North Korea's internal politics and backed up by a strong South Korean response supported by the U.S., writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '76).

  • The Effect of Attending Full-Day Kindergarten on English Learner Students

    Jul 23, 2015

    Research by alum Alison Jacknowitz (cohort '99) and Prof. Jill Cannon published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management finds that English learners in Los Angeles benefitted from full-day kindergarten for reading and retention outcomes.

  • In the Interest of Justice

    Jun 26, 2015

    As the line between criminal justice and national security continues to blur, alum K. Jack Riley (cohort '88) offers three principles that can help young criminology practitioners and scholars.

  • Physician Waivers to Prescribe Buprenorphine Increase Access to Effective Treatment Options

    Jun 9, 2015

    The increased number and geographic distribution of physicians obtaining waivers to prescribe buprenorphine has widened potential access to effective treatment for those with addiction to heroin or prescription painkillers, according to research by alum Brad Stein (cohort '97) and RAND colleagues.

  • The Costs of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

    Jun 8, 2015

    What are the net costs and benefits to Israelis and Palestinians if the current impasse endures over the next ten years, relative to several alternative trajectories that the conflict could take? Student Shira Efron (cohort '11), alum Bradley Stein (cohort '97), and professors Ross Anthony, Daniel Egel, and Craig Bond contributed to this groundbreaking research.

  • Are Airport Security Screeners Looking for the Wrong Things?

    Jun 4, 2015

    An investigation revealed that the TSA has failed in contraband testing, at a 95 percent rate. This shouldn't be perceived as an indictment of TSA workers. writes alum Jack Riley (cohort '88), but it may be an indictment of the particular assignments they've been given.

  • Spring 2015 Alumni Newsletter Available Online

    Jun 3, 2015

    The latest issue of Findings features our inaugural Brown Faculty-in-Residence, seven new alumni jobs, five new alumni, two visiting alumni, eight event photos, and countless news.

  • Improving Care for Chronic Conditions

    Jun 3, 2015

    Unless chronic conditions are managed effectively and efficiently, health care costs in the coming decades will be staggering. Alumni Todi Mengistu and Lisa Klautzer (both cohort '07) worked with professor Soeren Mattke and other RAND colleagues to conduct an assessment of chronic care management programs to document the current range services, identify best practices and trends, and examine factors that limit program optimization.

  • NEJM Study Shows Gay Youth Bullied More than Straight Youth

    May 8, 2015

    A study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that young people who later identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual are bullied more than their peers as early as 5th grade. Alum Mark Schuster (cohort '91), Chief of General Pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, led the study and discusses his findings.

  • Online Training Can Teach Psychotherapists Evidence-Based Treatments

    May 5, 2015

    Psychotherapy treatments can lag years behind what research has shown to be effective because there simply are not enough clinicians trained in new methods. But Pardee RAND alum Brad Stein (cohort '97) and colleagues find that e-learning can be as successful as in-person instruction for teaching psychotherapists how to use newer evidence-based treatments.

  • Have Beyond Yellow Ribbon Programs Met Their Goals?

    May 4, 2015

    Beyond Yellow Ribbon funding supports programs intended to provide critical outreach services to personnel returning from deployments and ease their transition into civilian life. An assessment by Mollie Rudnick (cohort '11), alum Lindsay Daugherty (cohort '05), and professor Laura Werber, looking at 13 such programs, can help stakeholders and congressional policymakers as they consider future BYR allocations.

  • Alum Writes Policy Brief on China and Middle East

    Apr 28, 2015

    Alum Chaoling Feng (cohort '09) wrote a Brookings policy brief, Embracing interdependence: the dynamics of China and the Middle East, in which she argues that China and particularly the GCC states must work to further institutionalize their growing economic interdependence.

  • South Korea's Missile-Defense System Decision: Q&A with Bruce Bennett

    Apr 3, 2015

    Chinese pressure on South Korea not to allow deployment of a terminal high-altitude air defense (THAAD) defense missile system has become a major regional security issue. Alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75) answers a Q&A on what might it mean if the U.S. deploys it anyway.

  • Substantial Productivity Growth in U.S. Hospitals from 2002 to 2011

    Mar 10, 2015

    In a study of U.S. hospitals treating Medicare patients with heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia, findings by Pardee RAND alum Neeraj Sood (cohort '99) and RAND colleagues suggest that productivity in U.S. health care could be higher than previous studies had indicated.

  • Is Geographic Clustering Driving Political Polarization?

    Mar 3, 2015

    The ideological gap separating the Republican and Democratic parties in Congress has grown dramatically wider in recent decades, write Alum Jesse Sussell (cohort '10) and former RAND president James Thomson. An analysis of the presidential vote in congressional districts over the last 60 years finds that the degree to which most districts are different from the “average” district has grown, supporting the theory that polarization stems from geographic clustering.

  • Future of Coastal Flooding

    Feb 25, 2015

    President Obama's executive order that directs federal agencies to plan and build for higher flood levels as they construct new projects in flood-prone regions will affect hundreds of billions of dollars of future public works projects. In an ideal world, write Pardee RAND faculty Debra Knopman and Rob Lempert, and alum Jordan Fischbach (cohort '04), planners would estimate the benefits and costs for each project, taking into account everything from the details of the local landscape to the potential for adaptive responses over time.