Alumni: Life After Pardee RAND

PRGS Alumni at 2016 Commencement

Photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND

Alumni gather to celebrate Commencement Weekend 2016

Since its inception in 1970, the Pardee RAND Graduate School has graduated more than 300 PhDs. Our alumni have gone on to a wide range of jobs in government, business, non-profit institutions, and academia.

Pardee RAND organizes alumni activities and encourages alumni to let us know of their achievements and whereabouts. This page provides a brief glimpse at some recent events and news.

  • Technological Lessons from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Accident

    Jun 1, 2016

    To improve responses to future radiological or nuclear contingencies, alum Sarah Evans (cohort '12) and professors Cynthia Dion-Schwartz, Scott Harold, and Lloyd Thrall draw lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant. They analyze how technologies were used successfully to counter radioactive contamination and identify capability gaps that could be redressed through novel technologies or improved use of existing technologies.

  • Healthcare funding options needed in India

    May 25, 2016

    Providing every citizen access to healthcare is the dream of all governments. Indeed, the sustainable development of every nation depends upon the health of its population. While India can boast of rapid economic development, its unfinished public health agenda is still worrying, writes alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80).

  • Middle School Intervention Program Leads to Long-Term BMI Reduction

    May 23, 2016

    A five-week obesity prevention program helped obese seventh grade students lose weight over a long-term period, according to research by alum Mark Schuster (cohort '91) and RAND colleagues. The average reduction in body mass index two years later when they entered high school translated into about nine pounds lower bodyweight.

  • Want Better Health Coverage? Change Your ZIP Code

    May 23, 2016

    Medicare's reliance on private contractors to run the program exacerbates the nation's health disparities by denying Americans in certain states access to life-saving medical advances, writes alum Kenneth Thorpe (cohort '80).

  • How to Get Americans Moving Again

    May 20, 2016

    In a New York Times commentary, Arthur Brooks (cohort '96) writes, "Mobility is more than just a metaphor for getting ahead. In America, it has been a solution to economic and social barriers."