Welcome to the Pardee RAND Graduate School

The Pardee RAND Graduate School is the Original Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis

Unique in American higher education, the Pardee RAND Graduate School is the nation's largest public policy Ph.D. program and the only program based at an independent public policy research organization—the RAND Corporation. 

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How to Apply

Our online application for the Fall 2015 entering cohort is now closed. If you are interested in learning more about the application process for 2016, visit our Admissions section.

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Degree Program

The Pardee RAND Ph.D. Program comprises an interdisciplinary core curriculum, optional analytic concentration, policy specialization, on-the-job training, and a policy-relevant dissertation.

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News & Featured Research

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  • Interactive Map Highlights Research Related to Global Human Progress

    Mar 25, 2015

    Through the Pardee Initiative, Pardee RAND students and RAND researchers conduct extensive work and write about issues of global human development around the world. An interactive map allows users to learn more about—and more easily access—that research.

  • Visions of Law Enforcement Technology in the Period 2024-2034

    Mar 16, 2015

    Mikhail Zaydman (cohort '12) helped run the Law Enforcement Futuring Workshop, which identified ten possible future scenarios and 30 high-priority technology needs for law enforcement based on consideration of current and future trends in society, technology, and law enforcement.

  • Mitigating the Impact of Ebola in Potential Hot Zones

    Feb 23, 2015

    The experiences of African countries that successfully contained Ebola early can be informative for government officials, international organizations, and aid agencies seeking to capture the underlying factors that affect countries' resilience to such outbreaks and can help them prepare for high-risk scenarios, according to research by students Shira Efron (cohort '11) and Bill Gelfeld (cohort '14) and professor Melinda Moore.

  • Are Changing Constituencies Driving Rising Polarization in the U.S. House of Representatives?

    Feb 17, 2015

    Long-term geographical clustering of voters is responsible for roughly 30 percent of the increase in polarization in the U.S. House of Representatives between the 93rd and 112th Congresses, according to research by alum Jesse Sussell (cohort '10) and former RAND president James Thomson.

  • Individual Empowerment: Global Societal Trends to 2030

    Feb 16, 2015

    Marlon Graf (cohort '12), Prof. Dmitry Khodyakov, and colleagues analyzed how human development, grassroots movements and access to the internet and social media are likely to empower citizens in Europe and beyond, forming a significant societal challenge for the EU in the coming decades.

In Their Own Words