Welcome to the Pardee RAND Graduate School

The Pardee RAND Graduate School is the Original Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis

Unique in American higher education, the Pardee RAND Graduate School is the nation's largest public policy Ph.D. program and the only program based at an independent public policy research organization—the RAND Corporation. 

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How to Apply

The application period for the Fall 2017 entering cohort has now closed. Visit our Admissions section to learn more about the application process for the entering class of 2018; a pre-application will be available in the summer.

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Degree Program

The Pardee RAND Ph.D. Program comprises an interdisciplinary core curriculum, optional analytic concentration, policy specialization, on-the-job training, and a policy-relevant dissertation.

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News & Featured Research

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  • Improving MACRA's Chances of Success

    Jan 9, 2017

    Starting in 2019, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act will integrate and potentially simplify performance measurement by combining a number of measures and programs. Research on performance measurement provides a good deal of insight on how to avoid several pitfalls in MACRA's rollout, writes prof. Peter Hussey.

  • Trump Should Confront Kim Over ICBM Tests

    Jan 6, 2017

    Whether successful or not, an ICBM test by North Korea would be very much against U.S. interests and President-elect Trump should act to counter it as early as possible. A turn to the basics of deterrence would be the path most likely to succeed, writes alum Bruce Bennett (cohort '75).

  • Improving HIV and Mental Health Care in Uganda

    Jan 5, 2017

    A small team of RAND researchers, including two Pardee RAND professors, has spent years working with local clinics in Uganda to help people not just survive HIV, but learn to live with it, and even thrive.

  • Can a Continuous Coverage Requirement Produce a Healthy Insurance Market?

    Jan 4, 2017

    A continuous coverage requirement is intended to discourage individuals from waiting until they become sick to purchase insurance. Student Erin Duffy (cohort '15) says such a requirement works well in theory to maintain a healthy marketplace, but there is little evidence on how well it might work in practice.

  • Uncertainty Ahead: Defense Technology and Acquisition Trends in 2017

    Jan 3, 2017

    Prof. Cynthia Cook writes that the change in administration, coupled with the new management structure being imposed by Congress on the Department of Defense's acquisition enterprise, is creating a shifting and unpredictable landscape for 2017.

  • Walking Away from One-China Policy Imperils Taiwan

    Dec 22, 2016

    The U.S. One-China policy has helped keep the peace for decades. Abandoning it now could result in stiffer Chinese resolve. Such a strategy may even backfire by triggering an otherwise avoidable crisis, writes prof. Michael Chase.

In Their Own Words